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Jimmy Nelson spent his early days in Nigeria—his father was a geologist for Shell—and his adolescence at a Jesuit boarding school in northern England. He was 16 when he contracted cerebral malaria while visiting his parents in Africa, but when he returned to school he was “treated” with the wrong medicine. The next morning, his hair had fallen out. Two years later, tired of living like an outcast—he’d had enough of being judged by his appearance—he fled to where bald heads were not only accepted, but seemingly the norm. By then, he had also found photography.

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Original author: 
WSJ Staff

In this week’s pictures, a soldier takes part in Victory Day commemorations in Moscow, a graduate dresses casually at a commencement ceremony President Obama attends in Ohio, a woman in a wedding dress gets muddy in England, and more.

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TEDxCentralSaintMartins - Tom Hulme - Designing for Emergence

Tom is Design Director at IDEO in London, where he uses the innovation and design process to develop new business opportunities. A serial entrepreneur and angel investor, Tom has first-hand experience in building successful enterprises and, as a result, a very thorough understanding of business. He is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum and was listed in WIRED UK's top 100 "digital power brokers". He is particularly interested in commercializing new products and services, and his IDEO clients and angel investments include technology, retail, fashion, fast-moving consumer goods, financial services, and hospitality brands. Tom founded OpenIDEO, IDEO's open innovation platform that won a 2011 Webby Award in the Community Category and presently has over 30000 users from more than 170 countries. The technology is now being applied to clients to manage their own closed communities. Prior to attending college, Tom spent a year teaching secondary school in Tanzania, contributing to his belief in the power of entrepreneurship for sustainable social good. Tom then earned a bachelor's degree in physics (with honors) from the University of Bristol and an MBA from Harvard Business School, where he received the Baker Scholar Award of high distinction. In 1998, he joined British sports-car manufacturer Marcos, where he became managing director and transformed the loss-making company into a profitable enterprise by diversifying the company into race and road cars. He sold <b>...</b>
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Conversation with Michael “Nick” Nichols

play this essay

 

David Alan Harvey: Now the thing is that you were a photographer first. When I met you, you were a Magnum photographer. Now you   are Editor at Large at National Geographic. Pretty obvious though, this doesn’t seem to be an office job.

Michael “Nick” Nichols: I’m only a photographer.

DAH: You’re only a photographer. Well no you’re more than that. You do other things.

MN: But it all comes from photography.

DAH: I know it all comes from photography, but what I want to talk about, in today’s world, and you evolved your photography and also into the…well you created the Look3 festival for one thing which is for other photographers beside yourself. So, you do a lot of stuff outside, you teach workshops.

MN: And that’s since you and I are so joined at the hip because we both for some reason feel it is important to give it back to the next generation.

DAH: Why did we ever think that was a good idea?

MN: The reason it happened to me was because Charles Moore, my start came from somebody else saying, oh I’m going to help out this kid.

DAH: Right.

MN: And I like that, so I’ve always felt that it’s important. And history is important to me, so building on something and not leaving it behind…if I meet a young photographer that doesn’t know Alex Webb’s work, or your’s or Eugenes, I’m like, well what are you doing? You’ve got to build on stuff.

DAH: That’s right. So Charles Moore helped you and then when he did that you felt like payback some day when you made it.

MN: Yeah.

DAH: Yeah, same for me. I felt that way when I was at my first Missouri workshop. These Life magazine and National Geographic photographers were looking at my contact sheets and I thought well, that’s just the coolest thing…If I make it, I’m paying back too. So we’re similar that way.

MN: And just in full disclosure, I love you dearly, your one of my best friends, I never get to see you, I’ve followed Burn from the beginning although I’m not part of Burn. You know, I’m fully supportive of everything you do even if I’m not there.

DAH: You are part of Burn.

MN: You know this is my first appearance in Burn…this interview. But I’ve been with Burn from the beginning because I believe in what your doing. Always. And I know that you’re with me when I’m with the lions. Somewhere there.

DAH: Oh, always with you when your with the lions.

MN: Were going to some day sit on the porch and do what we say were gonna do.

DAH: Yeah, the only problem we’ve got is that for some reason we’re like work-aholics or something. We can’t get to that porch. You’ve got a nice porch to sit on. We’ve done some of that during Look3 and previous visits to your house. And you’ve come down and visited my family at the beach and I got an extra bedroom for you at my house, so you’re welcome.

MN: And that’s the other thing…my family feels like your part of our family.

DAH: Well we feel that way about each other, yes.

MN: And your kids treat me as if I’m part of the family. So I want everybody to know that we’re not just casual acquaintances.

DAH: Well that’s right, that’s right.

MN: Yeah.

DAH: I mean and we have a lot of fun together. Somehow we always manage to have a lot of fun together. And a lot of laughs, but you’re way different from me in one respect because, and Bryan has even told me this, Bryan who went to the Ndoki with you and made his first film on you on the Ndoki, told me…basically told me that well, Nick works way harder than you do Dad. And I think there’s no doubt about that. When I look at the films, when I look at the stuff, the logistics, the things that you have to deal with to get those pictures, you have to go through a whole lot of logistical stuff before you can even begin to take…

MN: Easily by the time I get to an assignment I’m completely exhausted because of the money I had to raise, all the gear I had to put together, all the…this last one’s 50 boxes going to Tanzania, two years of fundraising, you know, literally almost 10 years of talking about lions, and then you, of course, your pictures have to start to live up to all the hype that you’ve…not hype…whatever you’ve done to…and if I had to say who my favorite photographer on earth was, it would be a battle between Alex and Eugene because I love that complexity. And to do that in natural history is incredibly difficult. So, you know, I’m not satisfied with a telephoto lens but sometimes that’s where you are. So, it’s incredibly difficult technically, but I don’t want anybody to see the technical when they see the picture. You know, when they look at that tree, if they’re thinking about how we put it together, than I missed them. I didn’t do it right. It’s supposed to be spiritual. And so I’m trying to get back to the simplicity that David Alan Harvey uses in his photography. But the level of work that takes…but you know the part about working so hard is I am incredibly driven. You know, I drive myself to collapse, and the only other person I can compare that to is Jim, on the fact that we’ll work ourself till we die, but I don’t know any other way. I don’t know half. I don’t know thirty percent. That’s why I’m gonna quit, because I can’t figure out how to slow down.

DAH: But you’ve been saying “i quit” for a long time.

MN: Yeah but I’m serious. When I said last waltz, what I mean literally is that, like they did, they didn’t quit playing music, or I’m not going to be a National Geographic’s guy after this project and I’m not going to move on to the next project. I’ll extend this one as long as I can, but then I want to go back and say, can I be David? Can I be simple? Because there’s too much volume in what I do. There’s too much noise.

DAH: There’s a lot of moving parts to what you do.

MN: Yeah, and the stress level and the fact that I’ve got this incredible woman in my life, who has been there for the whole trip, and you know you can fuck that up, and I survived all the chances to fuck it up. And so the fact that she’s still with me and we’re tighter now than we’ve ever been.

DAH: Well I see that, I see that, it’s amazing. Well Reba is an amazing woman and you’ve been gone, you’ve been out in the jungle, you’ve been in the top of a tree for months at a time, and she’s still there when you get back. Part of it probably is that she’s an artist herself.

MN: She was attracted to me because I was an artist and I was attracted to her because she was an artist. So we support the obsession of being an artist. And I, you know, people can cut and slice any way they want, I was gone while the kids were growing and I didn’t get penalized for that. You can get penalized for that. But now that they’ve grown, I’m sitting there with them. I’m with them.

DAH: No I see that, I see that. Well let me just go back just for a second here because when I met you, I mean now you’re a senior editor, what is your exact title? Editor at large?

MN: I’m Editor at Large.

DAH: Ahhh busted, you had to stop and think about your title Nick. Size does matter.

MN: Laughing..Well no, because I work so hard to get that word staff photographer off my title. I hate that word. It’s venom to me. You know, because it means ownership. I’m not owned by anybody. I assure you that. I’m milking this place like nobody in the history of photography.

DAH: No, no, don’t  worry  this is an honest conversation…. it is too late for either of us to get fired.

MN: Well, I’ve given them more than I got.

DAH: Well of course you have and they know that. That goes without saying. They know that.

MN: But I like the tone of editor at large because what that means is not in the office. It means out there. So I fought really hard for that title.

DAH: And you’re keeping readers for them too. You’re good business.

MN: Some of my colleagues think that I’m old. I’m not old.

DAH: David Alan Harvey doesn’t think you’ve ever been old. When I met you, you gotta remember, you were a Magnum photographer when I met you and you shifted from Magnum to National Geographic, from an institutional standpoint, spiritually you are a Magnum photographer. Funny how we literally “traded places”..But you needed the capital resourcing. Period.

MN: Yeah exactly, Magnum is in my DNA.

DAH: But the thing is, I can go out and do my thing for ten dollars and where I need ten dollars you need a hundred thousand dollars, therefore you needed the National Geographic behind you. NatGeo has been good to you…and to me.

MN: And I can’t justify what I do if I’m not reaching the planet. I gotta have a huge audience because my work is about saving the planet, you know. Its not about me, its about tigers and elephants and stuff like that. So if I didn’t have this microphone, I’d just be pissing into the wind. This is the only place on earth that I can do what I do.

DAH: That’s right. Ok Chris (Johns) in his article was talking about being driven. I feel driven, and sometimes I feel like it’s a burden almost to be driven because you can’t get off of it. When you were a kid, I saw a picture of you in the 4th or 5th grade in Alabama. That’s where you’re from.

MN: Yeah

DAH: That’s where Reba is from.

MN: Yeah, that’s why I’m called Nick. My best friend’s growing up we’re Bubba, Fuzzy, and Stevie Wonder.

DAH: My nickname was Heavenly.  I know your mother. Partied with your mother and you and the gang. I photographed you and your mother together for my family project. Where’s that drive coming from? What’s the nut of that thing? Where’s that fire coming from? Where’s that work ethic coming from?

MN: Fear, first off.

DAH: Fear works.

MN: Fear of failure. I’d love for people to understand that no matter where you get it, if your not afraid, something’s wrong with you. Every time you go out, you should be afraid. But then the work ethic of being poor…my mom raised us, my dad left when I was a kid, she’s had no education, and my dad was in the picture but he always thought, your just a lazy hippy. You know, I’m obsessive, I’m obsessive compulsive and photography gives me a….

DAH: a kind of  hippy.

MN: I’m definitely a hippy.

DAH: And yet you’ve got a work ethic.

MN: I’ve got a pop side to me. My stories are very popular. I can tell you that the readers love them.

DAH: Oh yeah, I love them too.

MN: But the work thing is…I don’t know anything else. That’s the problem. I don’t know how to turn it down. Once that train left the station, and I got on it, I haven’t figured out how to ever get off.

 

Photo taken by Kyle George

View Nicks personal website at www.michaelnicknichols.com or go directly to his iPad app here.

Related Links

LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph

 

 

 

 

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Photographer Benjamin Drummond and writer Sara Joy Steele work as a documentary team, producing top-notch audio, video, research and still photography looking at environmental issues facing people around the world. Their ongoing, award-winning project Facing Climate Change examines how global environmental changes are affecting people in localized ways. The images in this gallery are from a recent collaboration with the Conservation International–a new global camera mammal study that seeks to provide data on species from protected areas in the Americas, Africa and Asia. A total of 420 cameras were placed around the world, with 60 motion-activated cameras set up in each site at a density of one per every two square kilometers for a month in each site.

“What makes this study scientifically groundbreaking is that we created for the first time consistent, comparable information for mammals on a global scale setting an effective baseline to monitor change. By using this single, standardized methodology in the years to come and comparing the data we receive, we will be able to see trends in mammal communities and take specific, targeted action to save them”, said Dr. Jorge Ahumada, ecologist with the Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring Network at Conservation International, noting that 2010 cameras have been installed in new places, expanding the monitoring network to 17 sites (Panama, Ecuador, another site in Brazil, two sites in Peru, Madagascar, Congo, Cameroon, Malaysia and India). “Without a systematic, global approach to monitoring these animals and making sure the data gets to people making decisions, we are only recording their extinctions, not actually saving them.” To see a gallery of remarkable images made with the motion activated cameras in the study, click here.

Photos by Benjamin Drummond, August, 2011

The first global camera trap mammal study has documented 105 species in nearly 52,000 images from seven protected areas across the Americas, Africa and Asia. In the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania, field technicians hike cross-country to install a motion-triggered camera.

At each research site, 60 cameras are placed on a grid of one camera per two square kilometers. The photographic data helped scientists confirm that habitat loss has a direct and detrimental impact on the diversity and survival of mammal populations.

Tanzania field technicians Steven Shinyambala, Emanuel Martin, and Aggrey Uisso check the alignment of a newly set camera trap in Udzungwa National Park.

Each camera will run day and night for 30 days to photograph passing mammals and birds. The study is the first to collect comparable information on mammals at a global scale and provides a baseline to monitor change.

The forests of Tanzania’s Udzungwa Mountains provide a critical source of water to surrounding rice and sugarcane fields. The camera trap data helps scientists understand how mammals are impacted by local, regional and global threats such as overhunting, conversion of land to agriculture and climate change.

This African leopard, a threatened species, was captured by a camera trap in Tanzania’s Udzungwa Mountains. This image is one of nearly 52,000 photos taken as part of the first global camera trap mammal study.

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More than 20,000 photographs, from over 130 countries were submitted to the National Geographic Photography contest, with both professional photographers and amateur photo enthusiasts participating. The grand prize winner was chosen from the three category winners: Nature - Shikhei Goh, People - Izabelle Nordfjell, Places - George Tapan. Shikhei Goh, of Indonesia, took the grand prize honors with his amazing photograph of a dragonfly in the rain and will be published in the magazine. The competition was judged on creativity and photographic quality by a panel of experts composed of field biologist and wildlife photojournalist Tim Laman, National Geographic photographer Amy Toensing and National Geographic nature photographer Peter Essick. The winning submissions can be viewed at http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/photo-contest/ - Paula Nelson (14 photos total)
Grand Prize Winner and Nature Winner - SPLASHING: This photo was taken when I was taking photos of other insects, as I normally did during macro photo hunting. I wasn’t actually aware of this dragonfly since I was occupied with other objects. When I was about to take a picture of it, it suddenly rained, but the lighting was just superb. I decided to take the shot regardless of the rain. The result caused me to be overjoyed, and I hope it pleases viewers. Batam, Riau Islands, Indonesia (Photo and caption by Shikhei Goh)

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Features and Essays 

To start off, great gallery on Lightbox,  by no other than Yuri Kozyrev…Don’t mean to always highlight Lightbox and  Kozyrev first, but the Time photo editors’ blog has been one of the best things happen this year in/for photojournalism… Great coverage…And Kozyrev has been the photographer whose work has popped up constantly in 2011 (during each of the last four years that I’ve been doing Photojournalism there seems to have been one prolific photographer who defined the  year for me.. in 2010 it was Lynsey Addario, the year before Marcus Bleasdale, and in 2008 it was Lauren Greenfield), so it’s probably suitable that this post (which might or might not be the last this year. We shall see) kicks off with yet another Kozyrev/Lightbox combo…

Time magazine decided on The Person of the Year… This year it’s The Protestor…

Yuri Kozyrev has photographed lot those protestors during the uprisings and revolutions that have occurred in the Middle East this year… He reflects back at the events and photographs…

Cairo, Egypt — February 1, 2011. Thousands of Egyptians flooded Cairo after Mubarak refused to step down.

Yuri Kozyrev: My Year on the Revolution Road (Lightbox)

Hapak made some portraits…

Peter Hapak: The Protestors (Lightbox)

It’s insane how much Kozyrev has been clocking up miles this year…. This from Tunisia…

Yuri Kozyrev: Sidi Biuzid, the Tunisian Town Where the Arab Spring Began (TIME)

More from the continuing Arab Spring…

Tim Fadek has a new website, where you can see his recent Egypt work, including the brilliant Time cover photo…

Timothy Fadek: Revolution Part II: Cairo (Photographer’s website)

Giorgos Moutafis: Arab Spring : One Year After (Newsweek)

photo: Alex Majoli

New Yorker (various photographers): 2011: Twelve Months of Protest 

Kim Badawi: Life in Tahrir Square (New Yorker)

US pulled its troops from Iraq…

Andrea Bruce: Leaving Iraq (NYT)

Andrea Bruce: Portraits of Iraqi Pride (NYT)

Kael Alford: Iraqi Voices (Msnbc photo blog)

JB Russell: Faces of Iraqs Suffering (Panos)

Tyler Hicks: The Civilian Toll in Libya (NYT)

From upcoming National Geographic Magazine’s January 2012 issue…

William Albert Allard: Northern Montana’s Hi-Line (NGM)

George Steinmetz: Africa’s Afar Depression (NGM)

Lynn Johnson: Cambodia’s Healing Field (NGM)

Very strong series by Brent Stirton on Reportage site on AIDS in Ukraine…

Brent Stirton: AIDS in Ukraine (Reportage)

Marcus Bleasdale: HIV and TB in Tanzania (Photographer’s website)

Marcus Bleasdale: Lead Poisoning in Nigeria (VII)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind is really rocking at the moment… awards and recognition left, right, and centre (Just this week Honourable Mention in the Unicef Photo of the Year for the Siberian Supermodels pic seen below the National Womb one… See info on that later in this post) and most importantly work published in great publications… Her project originally done for this year’s Joop Swart Masterclass got printed in The New York Times a week ago…

Anastasia Taylor-Lind: The National Womb (NYT) Same in Lens blog

Her Siberian Supermodels is on VII site…

Anastasia Taylor-Lind: Siberian Supermodels (VII)

Donald Weber: J-Village (VII)

Bruno Barbey: Istanbul (Magnum)

Chris Steele-Perkins: Xiangshawan, Mongolia (Magnum)

Ami Vitale: Design for a Living World (Panos)

Maisie Crow: Half-Lives: The Chernobyl Workers Now (VQR Vimeo)

Justin Jin: Tuva Reborn (Panos)

Stefan Boness: Going it Alone in Asmara (Panos) Eritrea

Damon Winter: Double Diagnosis (NYT) Lives Restored series [video]

You can see a shorter edit of Lynsey Addario’s Gaza series I shared last time on main VII site…

Lynsey Addario: Gaza (VII)

Ashley Gilbertson: Occupy Wall Street (VII Magazine)

Platon: Democracy Now : Russian Activists (Photo Booth)

Dmitry Kostyukov: Living on the Edge : Central Asians in Russia (FT Magazine)

George Osodi: Rape of Paradise (Panos)

Chris de Bode: Exodus (Panos Vimeo)

Paula Bronstein:  Myanmar’s hidden capital Naypyitaw (Getty)

Pep Bonet: El Futuro Es Sus Manos (Noor)

Spencer Platt: Inner City Boxing Gym (CNN Photo blog)

Emily Schiffer: Securing Food in Chicagoland (Lightbox)

Yuri Kozyrev: Sochi, location of 2012 Winter Olympics (NOOR)

Rob Hornstra: The Sochi Project (Project website)

Ester Jove Soligue: Encampment on New Jersey Cliffs (NYT Lens) Soligue’s website

Ton Koene: Steel Town (zReportage)

Kathleen Flynn: Fight to Recover (zReportage)

London based photographer Anders Birger has been to Syria recently… Not many photographers can say that.

Anders Birger: Living in the Shadow of Assad (Demotix)

Guy Martin: Libya’s Lost (Panos)

Jessica Pons: Garden of Ashes (Foto8) Pons’ website

Magnum Photos’ year in review…

photo: Christopher Anderson
USA. NYC. 2011. Andrew Kinard photographed at his apartment in midtown. Andrew lost his legs to an explosion in Iraq as a Marine in 2006.

Magnum Photos: 2011 : The Year in Review

Time photo editors picks of best photojournalism to appear in the magazine in 2011… Includes the below James Nachtwey photo from Kesennuma, Japan, which I remember having seen in black and white before… [You can compare the colour and monochrome versions here]

photo: James Nachtwey A lone house in an overflowed river in Kesennuma, Japan on March 15, 2011.

Time’s Best Photojournalism of 2011

WSJ: Photos of the Year 2011

photo: Chris Hondros

Getty Images: The Year in Focus

photo: Ed Ou

Reportage by Getty Images: 2011 – Year in Review 

New York Times: Year in New York Pictures (NYT Lens)

MSNBC: Pictures of the Year for 2011

Boston Globe Big Picture : The Year in Pictures pt 1 | pt 2 | pt 3 out on Friday this week

Most surprising photos of 2011 picked by Time photo editors…

A prison-transport vehicle sinks into a river after it was allegedly commandeered by escaped prisoners on the outskirts of Cairo. Several prisons saw revolts and break-ins after police retreated from most areas. Jan. 31, 2011

photo: Dominic Nahr  [The above photo looked really familiar. Realised I had seen the same scene in a Guy Martin photo. Compare the two here.]

Time magazine: The Most Surprising Photos of 2011

Time’s Best Portraits of 2011

Le Monde M magazine recently gave a carte blanche to a selected group of photographers around the world to shoot whatever they wanted in their home city…

photo: Tomas Munita in Santiago, Chile

Le Monde (various photographers): Carte blanche

Don’t usually link to travel pieces, but since this is shot by Adam Ferguson…

Adam Ferguson: In Cambodia, a Pocket of the Past (NYT)

Afghan Box Camera Project (Project website)

Clara Vanucci: Observing Holidays Behind Bars (NYT Lens)

Lisa Wiltse: Daulatdia Brothel (Visura) Bangladesh

Ciara Leeming: Elvira and Me (Issuu)

Marc Laita: American Extremes (Guardian)

Russell Monk: Open-Air Studio (NYT Lens)

Kim Jong Il passed away…Some notable North Korea essays from this and the last couple of years…

Damir Sagolj: North Korea’s Hunger Crisis (NYT Lens)

Irina Kalashnikova: North Korea (Reportage)

David Guttenfelder: Life in the Cult of Kim 

David Guttenfelder: North Korea in the Autumn (Denver Post)

Adam Dean:  All Hail the Great Successor! (Panos)

Tomas van Houtryve: North Korea: Secrets and Lies (VII)

Christopher Morris: Daily Life in North Korea (VII)

Sean Gallagher: Inside North Korea (burn)

See also…Kim Jong Phil and of course… Kim Yong-Il Looking at Things

Adam Dean: 2011 – The Year in Pictures (Photographer’s website)

Interviews  

Michael Nichols (CPN)

Stanley Green (Photo Raw)

Don McCullin (National Media Museum)

Stephanie Sinclair (NPR)

Damon Winter (NYT Lens)

David Guttenfelder (NPR)

Massoud Hossaini (AFP)

Annie Leibovitz (Newsweek)

Really nice interview with Ben Lowy…

Ben Lowy (Pop Photo)

Ben Lowy (CNN via Reportage Tumblr)

Lucia Herrero (e-photoreview)

Kadir van Lohuizen : Via PanAm part V (Nikon blog)

Alex Webb (MSNBC)

David Hurn (IdeasTap)

Anders Petersen (Lens Culture)

Bruce Davidson (New York Review of Books)

Shannon Stapleton : The Future of Iraq (Reuters blog)

Barbara Davidson : Back story on a ‘haunting’ image of famine in Africa (LA Times)

Matt Dunham : The story behind the news pictures (BBC)

Leon Neal: A year in the life of a press photographer (BBC)

Sanjit Das (PhotoShelter)

Giles Duley (PDN)

Giles Duley (5×15)

Monika Bulaj : The hidden light of Afghanistan (TED)

Sean Gallagher (Pulitzer Center)

Amanda Rivkin (National Geographic)

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #10 (Phaidon)

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #9 (Phaidon)

Timothy Saccenti : How I Got That Shot: Tricky Lights Up (PDN)

Jerry Uelsmann (NYT Lens)

Articles

Must read. BJP put the excellent Olivier Laurent post-processing report online already… Discusses Italian 10b lab and the work they do with Noor’s Yuri Kozyrev…includes fascinating examples frames before and after processing…

photos: Yuri Kozyrev . Post production: 10b Photography

BJP: Post-processing in the digital age: Photojournalists and 10b Photography

NYT: Their War at Home: Iraqi War Photographers | See also related Lens post

James Brabazon looks back at the previously unpublished final shots of Tim Hetherington…

Guardian: Tim Hetherington in Libya: witness to war

Also.

Guardian: Tim Hetherington remembered by Idil Ibrahim

Lightbox: In Memory of Photographers We Lost in 2011

CPJ: For journalists, coverage of political unrest 

MSN News: Shooting under fire: A journalist’s tale

PetaPixel: NYT Sends Angry Letter to NYPD Over Treatment of Photographer

Good.is: Where Have All the Photojournalists Gone?

Usagelicense.com: Understanding Usage Licenses

Guardian: The Month in Photography 

PDN: Top 15 Objects of Desire of 2011: A Gift Guide for Photographers

PhotoShelter: The Photo Gear Pro Photographers Want for the Holidays

PDN: Object of Desire: Schneider Optics iPro Lens System

Andrew DeVigal: Redefining Interactive Narratives & Multimedia Storytelling

On Editing (various photographers) (Hernan Zenteno blog)

BBC: Two students seeking an MA in Photojournalism: Part II

PDN: The Year in Photo News

Professional Photographer: 100 Most influential photographers of all time

Lens blog:  Kamber Looks Back on War (NYT)

Two Swedish journalists in trouble in Ethiopia. One of them is photographer Johan Persson

BBC News:  Swedish journalists found guilty in Ethiopia

Lacoste. FAIL.

PDN: Lacoste Elysée photo prize cancelled over project inspired by Palestinian push for statehood

BJP: Was the Lacoste Elysée Photography Prize censored?

BBC: A question of ethics: Photographers in the spotlight

Desmond Boylan: A photo blog without photos (Reuters blog)

Guardian: Best Photography in 2011

The Independent: Photo books of the year

Guardian:  12 best photobooks of the year by Sean O’Hagan

Top 20 Photobooks of 2011 by Alec Soth

NJ.com: Legacy of Syracuse student killed in Lockerbie bombing lives on through Alexia foundation

Jake Stangel:  is it lame to pay assistants $200/day editorial?

BBC: In Pictures: Nigerians Behind the Lens

BBC: The 75 years of pioneering photojournalism at Life magazine

PDN: What Can a Publicist Do for You?

Guardian: Ryan McGinley’s best shot

Verve: Jonathan Saruk

Verve: Jérémie Souteyrat

Scott Strazzante: iPhone Hipstamatic- still bad for photojournalism?

BJP: National Media Museum’s director steps down after news of restructuring

LeBron James. What. a. Dick.

Dead Spin: LeBron James Wouldn’t Let Walter Iooss Jr., Who Was Photographing Him For Nike, Speak Directly To Him

Videos

Shoot and Move On: A Day In The Life of Street Photographers (Youtube)

multiMedia

Life Force Magazine

Bloomberg Photos Tumbrl

Crowd Funding 

Filmmakers seeking funds for Don McCullin documentary (BJP)

Fiona Rogers is selling a Firecracker  diary to gather fund for a Firecracker photography grant…Go and get yourself a calendar…

photo seen in the diary by Dana Popa

Firecracker 2012 diary: Supporting European women photographers and the 2012 Firecracker Photographic Grant

Newsmotion by Newsmotion.org (Kickstarter)

Awards, Grants, and Competition

Unicef Photo of the Year has been chosen… Interesting detail: boy in the winning photo looks to be wearing a Barcelona shirt which of course is sponsored by Unicef

photo: Kai Löffelbein

Unicef Photo of the Year Winners | Slideshow on Der Spiegel website and on Guardian site

Hope for a Healthy World Photo Competition

 Magenta Flash Forward submissions

The 2012 World Press Photo Multimedia Contest website is now open for registration

POYi Calling for Entries

Terry O’Neill Award winners

Mikhael Subotsky is the winner of 2012 Standard Bank Young Artist Award

 2012 Sony World Photography Awards

Walid Raad Hasselblad Award Winner 2011

Agencies 

NOOR December newsletter

Noor Images Archive

Jobs

Agence France-Presse seeks photojournalist

Save The Children UK : Media Manager – multi-media (film & photography)

Photographers

Didn’t know Paul Fusco had his own website… His RFK Funeral Train has always been  a huge inspiration…

Paul Fusco

JM Lopez

Rafael Fabres

Amelia Shepherd

Ted McDonnell

To finish off…

Check out Shepard Fairey’s Obey Giant made out of a Yuri Kozyrev pic…

Several good posts by Shit Photojournalists Like  recently… Do see!

You shouldn’t miss Missy giving the lowdown on being a professional photographer either

And…Lego Pictures of the Year

And… Judge Joe Brown – Cheap wedding photographer

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Tanzania has faced double HIV/AIDS epidemics: an old generalised epidemic, (more than 6% prevalence in the general population) and more recently, a new concentrated one among injecting drug users (IDUs). Dar Es Salam is one of the areas most affected by this last epidemic.

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