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933924 512868958750541 697525497 n First official Brain Computer Interface journal coming in January 2014

At last, there will be a printed journal where BCI researchers can submit their work to. It is called the Brain-Computer Interfaces published by Taylor & Francis, an international company originating in the UK that publishes books and academic journals. The BCI journal was announced and its importance was discussed at the recent BCI meeting at Pacific Grove, California.

The new BCI journal will have four issues a year. The first issue is planned to be published in January 2014.

The journal will focus on the following areas:

  • Development and user-centered evaluation of engineered BCI applications with emphasis on the analysis of what aspects are crucial to making the system work, in addition to straightforward assessment of its success.
  • Scientific investigation of patterns of brain activity that can, or show promise to be able to, be used to drive BCI applications.
  • Development and evaluation of signal processing methods that extract signal features, classify them, and otherwise translate brain signals into device commands.
  • New invasive and noninvasive methods to monitor and acquire brain signals.
  • Applications of BCI technology to understand human perception, affect, action, and various aspects of cognition and behavior.
  • Ethical and sociological implications of brain-computer interfacing applications.
  • Human factors and human-computer interaction (HCI) concerns in the design, development and evaluation of BCIs.
  • Clinical trials and individual case studies of the experimental therapeutic application of BCIs.
  • Behavioral studies of BCI use in humans and animals.
  • Studies of neurosurgical techniques relevant to BCIs.
  • Proposal, review and analysis of standards for BCI hardware, software and protocols.

The new printed journal is clearly a great opportunity for the whole BCI community to get together and have a more organized publication standard. The contribution towards this journal will help the BCI community to find other researchers for collaboration more easily.

If you would like to have your paper for consideration, contact the co-editors Chang Nam and Jeremy Hill.

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Given that we now know that the National Security Agency (NSA) has the ability to compromise some, if not all of VPN, SSL, and TLS forms of data transmission hardening, it’s worth considering the various vectors of technical and legal data-gathering that high-level adversaries in America and Britain (and likely other countries, at least in the “Five Eyes” group of anglophone allies) are likely using in parallel to go after a given target. So far, the possibilities include:

  • A company volunteers to help (and gets paid for it)
  • Spies copy the traffic directly off the fiber
  • A company complies under legal duress
  • Spies infiltrate a company
  • Spies coerce upstream companies to weaken crypto in their products/install backdoors
  • Spies brute force the crypto
  • Spies compromise a digital certificate
  • Spies hack a target computer directly, stealing keys and/or data, sabotage.

Let’s take these one at a time.

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Tonight on BBC Three is the premier of Teen Exorcists, in which Brynne Larson and Tess and Savannah Scherkenback, teenage girls from Arizona who happen to be exorcists just like Brynne's dad, visit the UK! I bet they were a huge hit there. After all, Harry Potter author JK Rowling is British and, as Tess Scherkenback says, "The spells and things that you're reading in the Harry Potter books, those aren't just something that are made up, those are actual spells. Those are things that came from witchcraft books." What wonderful ambassadors of American culture these young women are. You can learn more about them in this BBC News profile: "Teen exorcists: Women who expel demons on stage"

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As we hit bladdy September and the dearly-missed UK rain’s back, we’ve got a shiny new issue feat. supermodel Lindsey Wixson, and naturally in tow is the new Monthly Playlist: Meet Brooklyn’s Dai Burger and Junglepussy, avant-garde pop singers Glasser, SZA, Hyperdub newcomer Jessy Lanza and Lorde, alongside Cape Town digi-funk team John Wizards and the NY ball scene’s Divoli S’vere, as well as Ducktails, Mazzy Star and distorted Derbyshire duo Drenge. Plus: a collabo between Floating Points and Hejira, the new The Weeknd Feat Drake (don’t miss the #DRAKEYOLOPOLOs), more from M.I.A, the Brenmar-produced Ian Isiah and Mickey Lightfoot feat. Darq E Freaker.

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After a string of strong supporting roles, Jude Law returns to the spotlight in Dom Hemingway. And what a noisy, colorful return it may be.

The gangster pic stars Law as a safecracker who’s just spent twelve years in prison for keeping his mouth shut. Once out, he reconnects with his old life by trying to collect his due from his boss (Demián Bichir) and make up with his estranged daughter (Emilia Clarke). Richard E. Grant plays Dom’s best friend, who’s along for the ride.

The first trailer has just hit, and you can check it out after the jump. Be warned that it’s NSFW, unless your own boss doesn’t mind seeing Law’s bare bottom on your computer screen.


[Digital Spy]

Law’s return to center stage comes not a moment too soon. He seems to be at the top of his form here, oozing charisma even as it becomes obvious that Dom is a terminal screw-up.

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When Urban Compass debuted to the public in May of this year, it had its fair share of doubters. The company was trying to reinvent the process of searching for an apartment in New York, a notoriously expensive, difficult, and fraud-filled endeavor. Four months later the company is approaching profitability, raising another $20 million in venture capital, and plotting its expansion into new cities like San Francisco, Boston, and Chicago

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It's the work of San Francisco studio Bot & Dolly, which believes its new technology can "tear down the fourth wall" in the theater. "Through large-scale robotics, projection mapping and software engineering, audiences will witness the trompe l'oeil effect pushed to new boundaries," says creative director Tarik Abdel-Gawad. "We believe this methodology has tremendous potential to radically transform visual art forms and define new genres of expression." Box is an effective demonstration of the studio's projection mapping system, but it works in its own right as an enthralling piece of art.

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