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The Third Floor Gallery in Cardiff, Wales, is exhibiting work from Sebastian Liste’s “Urban Quilombo” series, beginning tomorrow through June 23. There will be an opening tomorrow at 7pm. Visit the gallery’s Web site for more information.

Sebastian, who is represented by Reportage by Getty Images, is a Spanish photographer now living in Brazil. In 2010, while he was earning a Master’s degree in photojournalism at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, he won the Ian Parry Scholarship for his long-term project ‘Urban Quilombo’, about the extreme living conditions that dozens of families face, who set up home in an abandoned chocolate factory in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil.

Caption: A boy jumping from a building of an abandoned chocolate factory, on March 20, 2011, in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil. (Photo by Sebastian Liste/Reportage by Getty Images)

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People walk on the OCBC Skyway linking the Supertrees in the nearly completed Gardens By The Bay just next to Singapore’s busy financial district on Monday April 30, 2012 in Singapore. This is part of the city-state’s efforts to bring and nurture greenery within the city and capture the essence of Singapore as a tropical [...]

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Mark Boulton pulls together some of his thoughts and concerns regarding CSS grids and how they could (or, maybe, should) be created.

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Street patrols could be handled by security firms under the government's police privatisation plans

Private companies could take responsibility for investigating crimes, patrolling neighbourhoods and even detaining suspects under a radical privatisation plan being put forward by two of the largest police forces in the country. West Midlands and Surrey have invited bids from G4S and other major security companies on behalf of all forces across England and Wales to take over the delivery of a wide range of services previously carried out by the police. The contract is the largest on police privatisation so far, with a potential value of £1.5bn over seven years, rising to a possible £3.5bn depending on how many other forces get involved.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/mar/02/police-privatisation-security-f...

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Coal occupies a central position in modern human endeavors. Last year over 7000 megatons were mined worldwide. Powerful, yet dirty and dangerous, use of coal is expanding every year, with 2010 witnessing a production increase of 6.8%. Around 70 countries have recoverable reserves, which some estimates claim will last for over a hundred years at current production levels. Mining for coal is one of the world's most dangerous jobs. While deadliest in China, where thousands of miners die annually, the profession is still hazardous in the West and other regions as well. Our mining and use of coal accounts for a variety of environmental hazards, including the production of more CO2 than any other source. Other concerns include acid rain, groundwater contamination, respiratory issues, and the waste products which contain heavy metals. But our lives as lived today rely heavily on the combustible sedimentary rock. Over 40% of the world's electricity is generated by burning coal, more than from any other source. Chances are that a significant percentage of the electricity you're using to read this blog was generated by burning coal. Gathered here are images of coal extraction, transportation, and the impact on environment and society. The first eight photographs are by Getty photographer Daniel Berehulak, who documented the lives of miners in Jaintia Hills, India. -- Lane Turner (48 photos total)
22-year-old Shyam Rai from Nepal makes his way through tunnels inside of a coal mine 300 ft beneath the surface on April 13, 2011 near the village of Latyrke, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. In the Jaintia hills, located in India's far northeast state of Meghalaya, miners descend to great depths on slippery, rickety wooden ladders. Children and adults squeeze into rat hole like tunnels in thousands of privately owned and unregulated mines, extracting coal with their hands or primitive tools and no safety equipment. (Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

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The best photos of 2011 from around the globe. Warning: All images in this entry are shown in full, not screened out for graphic content. Some images contain dead bodies, graphic content and tragic events. We consider these images an important part of human history.

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