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Original author: 
Mikko Takkunen

Features and Essays

Robin Hammond

Robin Hammond / Panos Pictures / National Geographic

Robin Hammond: Zimbabwe: Breaking the Silence (The National Geographic Magazine) Oppression, Fear, and Courage in Zimbabwe | From the National Geographic magazine May issue.

Pete Muller: Questioning Zimbabwe’s Underdogs (NYT)

Sebastião Salgado: Genesis (NYT)

Michael Yamashita: China’s Ancient Lifeline (NGM) The 1,400-year-old Grand Canal is a monumental project that bound north and south China together. It’s still in use today.

FrancoPagetti / VII

Franco Pagetti / VII

Franco Pagetti: The Veils of Aleppo (LightBox)

Stanley Greene: The Dead and The Alive (NOOR) Syria

Giles Duley: Syrian Refugees (Guardian)

Nish L. Nalbandian: Portraits of Syrian Rebels (LA Times Framework blog)

Yusuf Sayman: Rebel Fighters Inside Aleppo (The Daily Beast)

Louie Palu

Louie Palu / Zuma Press / The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

Louie Palu: Documenting Murder in Mexico (Mother Jones) The brutality of the drug war, on both sides of the border.

Dominic Bracco II: A Salvation Army of One (NYT Magazine) The Rev. Robert Coogan working in Saltillo, Mexico.

Shiho Fukada / Panos Pictures

Shiho Fukada / Panos Pictures / The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

Shiho Fukada: Japan’s Rootless and Restless Workers (NYT Lens)

Jenn Ackerman: Minnesota, Frozen in Place and Time (NYT Lens)

Aaron Vincent Elkaim: The Last Great Race on Earth (Photo Booth) Iditarod, a thousand-and-forty-nine-mile race across Alaska

Fritz Hoffmann: On Beyond 100 (NGM) Photographer Fritz Hoffmann introduces us to people who have mastered the secret of long life.

Ami Vitale: Back at the Ranch (Panos Pictures)

David Guttenfelder / AP

David Guttenfelder / AP

David Guttenfelder: North Korea (Denver Post) While threats of a missile launch have renewed tensions with North Korea, photojournalist David Guttenfelder has returned to continue documenting life there.

Yuri Kozyrev: Pull Out From Afghanistan (NOOR)

Phil Moore: Mogadishu Boosts Security (Al Jazeera) Safety improves in Somalia’s once war-torn capital despite recent attack and ongoing threats of violence.

Zed Nelson: The Family (Institute) Zed Nelson’s project started in the summer of 1991, just turned 21

Gabriele Galimberti: My Couch Is Your Couch (Institute) Couchsurfers around the world

Steeve Iuncker / Agence VU

Steeve Iuncker / Agence VU

Steeve Iuncker: Yakutsk (LightBox) The Coldest City on Earth

James Whitlow Delano: Buried in Japan (TIME) Japan’s Aomori Prefecture might be at the same latitude as New York, but its climate can seem a lot more harsh.

Maja Daniels: In the mists of Älvdalen, Sweden (Financial Times Magazine) A world away from cosmopolitan Stockholm lies a strange forested land with an ancient language and a singular sense of quiet desolation

Antonio Olmos: Murder Most Ordinary (Guardian) Photographer Antonio Olmos spent two years visiting the site of every murder that took place within the M25 in London.

Ben Roberts: Higher Lands (Document Scotland) Growing up in the Scottish Highlands

Marco Kessler: Belarus: An Uncertain Winter (Vimeo) Belarus, once an integral frontier of the USSR, remains steeped in the Communist legacy, which ruled the daily lives of the nation for over 70 years.

Alexis Lambrou: Teaching for Life (NYT Lens) Young Brooklyn high school teacher, whose life revolves around her students and colleagues at a Brooklyn public high school.

Arthur Nazaryan: Ballet Competitions (NYT Lens) 12-year-old Russian immigrant’s efforts to become a ballerina

Amanda Rivkin: Post-Racial America Road Trip (VII Mentor)

Tommaso Protti: The Youth of Amid (Reportage by Getty Images Emerging Talent) Turkey

Adam Patterson: Another Lost Child (CNN Photo blog)

Patrick van Dam: Dreams of new homes abandoned in Greece (CNN Photo blog)

Articles

Eugene Richards

Eugene Richards

The Hero in the Cowboy Hat: Carlos Arredondo’s Story by Eugene Richards (LightBox)

A Photographer’s View of the Carnage: “When I Look at the Photos, I Cry” (LightBox)

Herald photographer details night Boston will never forget (Boston Herald)

News Media Weigh Use of Photos of Carnage (NYT)

A Blurry Double Standard? A Photo from the Boston Marathon Bombing (PhotoShelter)

Tragedy and the Role of Professional Photojournalists (Chicago Tribune Assignment Chicago blog)

On That Iconic Photo from the Boston Marathon Bombings (BagNewsNotes)

Runner, spectator get photos of marathon suspects (AP Big Story blog)

Photo Essay Of Boston Bomber Was Shot By Former BU Student (NPPA)

Courtesy HBO

Courtesy HBO

Peter van Agtmael: Revisiting Memory and Preserving Legacy: Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros (LightBox)

Tim Hetherington, Indelible on Film (NYT Lens)

A War Photographer Who Was More Than Just an Adrenaline Junkie (Mother Jones)

Killed documentary maker Tim Hetherington remembered in film (BBC) video

Which Way is the Frontline?: a documentary tribute to Tim Hetherington (BJP)

Tim Hetherington’s Photograph’s at the Yossi Milo Gallery (Photo Booth)

Honoring Chris Hondros (Getty Images blog)

Manu Brabo / AP

Manu Brabo / AP

The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Winners: Associated Press Coverage of Syria (LightBox)

The Pulitzer Prizes Winners (Pulitzer)

Photographs of Syria Sweep Pulitzer Prizes (NYT Lens)

Javier Manzano / AFP

Javier Manzano / AFP

A Pulitzer picture first day on the job (AFP Correspondent blog) Photograph taken by Javier Manzano in the embattled Syrian city of Aleppo on October 18, won the Pulitzer Prize for feature photography.

Witness to Newtown’s tragedy (Reuters TV) On December 14, 2012 a gunman opened fire on Sandy Hook Elementary School, leaving 26 dead, including 20 young children. Reuters photographers share their experience covering the story that devastated Newtown, Connecticut and the rest of the country.

David Guttenfelder / AP

David Guttenfelder / AP

Photographer chronicles life in North Korea (NBC)  In spite of the angry rhetoric, life in North Korea goes on as normal – or at least what passes as normal in this isolated state. AP photographer David Guttenfelder has been chronicling life in North Korea for years.

Those photos of young Kim Jong Un performing in ‘Grease’ are probably of his brother (The Washington Post)

I almost died in Syria (Salon)

Olivier Voisin’s last images (Paris Match L’instant)

Taking RISC: Program Trains Reporters How To Save Lives in War Zones (ABC News)

RISC: Training reporters how to save lives (BJP)

French photographer Pierre Borghi escapes four months after kidnapping in Afghanistan (New York Daily News)

John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation awarded Fellowships 2013 (Guggenheim Foundation)

Feisal Omar: “Are you al-Shabaab or soldiers?” (Reuters Photographers blog) Covering Somalia

Featured photojournalist: Christopher Furlong (Guardian)

Anastasia Rudenko (Verve Photo)

Thomas Cristofoletti (Verve Photo)

Challenging an Old Narrative in Latin American Photojournalism (NYT Lens)

Donna De Cesare’s Photo of Violence in El Salvador (NYT Lens)

How the 1962 monsoons inspired Steve McCurry (Phaidon) Forthcoming book, Steve McCurry Untold: The Stories Behind The Photographs, tells how coverage of the Indian rainy season in Life magazine set the Magnum photographer off on a life of photography and far flung travel.

Sebastiao Salgado’s Genesis (BBC)

Sebastião Salgado documents world’s wildernesses in new Genesis exhibition (Guardian)

Sebastião Salgado: Genesis – review (Guardian)

André Kertész: Truth and Distortion, Atlas Gallery, London – review (FT)

Explore Nic Dunlop’s new book Brave New Burma (Panos Pictures blog)

Muhammed Muheisen / AP

Muhammed Muheisen / AP

Wire Photographer Spotlight: Daily Life by Muhammed Muheisen (LightBox)

A Year Later, Instagram Hasn’t Made a Dime. Was it Worth $1 Billion? (TIME)

Making Art With Tom Waits (NYT Magazine)

The National Geographic Trove (Photo Booth)

Genius in colour: Why William Eggleston is the world’s greatest photographer (The Independent)

Bert Stern’s Beautiful Photography and Less-Beautiful Personal Life, on Screen (The Atlantic) A new documentary shows two sides of the man who took some of the most iconic celebrity photographs of the 20th century: creative genius and womanizer.

“Arnold Newman: At Work” explores photographer through his archive (Harry Ransom Center Cultural Compass blog)

Native Americans: Portraits From a Century Ago (The Atlantic)

Meeting Florida’s Seminoles Through Rediscovered Photos (NPR)

Photographer David Moore’s dingy, deteriorating Derby is the real deal (Guardian) Chronicler of 80′s working-class England peers behind closed doors to capture a community indelibly marked by Margaret Thatcher.

Graham Nash’s best photograph (Guardian) Joni Mitchell listening to her new album

Unsung hero of photography Thurston Hopkins turns 100 (Guardian)

This was England: the photographs of Chris Killip (Guardian) Chris Killip’s study of the communities that bore the brunt of industrial decline in the North East have earned him a nomination for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize.

Deutsche Börse Photography prize show: mashups and moon walkers (Guardian)

Deutsche Börse photography prize 2013 (Guardian) video | Sean O’Hagan meets the nominees for the annual Deutsche Börse photography prize. They’re all on show at the Photographers’ Gallery in London until June 30.

Estate of Jacques Lowe

Estate of Jacques Lowe

When an Archive is Lost: Jacques Lowe’s Rare (And Recently Restored) Look at JFK’s Camelot (LightBox)

The Heart of a Beast: Charlotte Dumas’ Poignant Animal Photography (LightBox)

Teenage Precinct Shoppers by Nigel Shafran: A Look Back to 1990 (LightBox)

The World’s Oldest Photography Museum Goes Digital (Smithsonian)

Pecha Kucha: The art of speed-talking about photography (BJP)

Martin Parr ‘Life’s A Beach’ Exhibit And Book Capture Fun In The Sun From Brazil To Japan (The Huffington Post)

The unseen Lee Miller: Lost images of the supermodel-turned-war photographer go on show (The Independent)

The Surreal World of Nina Leen (Photo Booth)

Rescuing a Photo Prince Vita Luckus From Obscurity (NYT Lens)

How photographers joined the self-publishing revolution (Guardian)

Elaborate Drive-By Photo Studio Takes Pedestrians by Surprise (Wired)

Interviews and Talks

John Tlumacki / The Boston Globe / Getty Images

John Tlumacki / The Boston Globe / Getty Images

John Tlumacki (LightBox) Tragedy in Boston: One Photographer’s Eyewitness Account | LightBox spoke with Boston Globe photographer John Tlumacki, who photographed the explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Tlumacki, who has photographed more than 20 marathons in his 30 years at the Globe, describes the sheer chaos of the scene.

John Tlumacki (Poynter) Globe’s Tlumacki: ‘I am dealing with trauma & trying to keep busy’ following Boston tragedy

Sebastião Salgado (Natural History Museum YouTube) Genesis

Sebastião Salgado (Guardian) A God’s eye view of the planet – interview

Sebastião Salgado (NYT) In Love With My Planet

Sebastião Salgado (Taschen) Two men, one mission: Salgado talks with Benedikt Taschen about the photographic project that changed his life.

Sebastian Junger (Indiewire) On the Value and Cost of War Reporting and Making a Film About His Late ‘Restrepo’ Co-Director Tim Hetherington

Sebastian Junger (NPR) ‘Which Way’ To Turn After Hetherington’s Death

Sebastian Junger (WNYC) The Life and Times of Tim Hetherington

Michelle McNally (Le Journal de la Photographie) The New York Times Director of Photography

James Estrin (Le Journal de la Photographie) NYT photographer and Lens blog editor

Patrick Witty (Zorye Kolektiv)  International Picture Editor at TIME

David Campbell to reveal WPPh multimedia research (Canon Professional Network)

Robin Hammond (NGM) The Moment: Caught in Zimbabwe

Jeff Jacobson (PDN) On Beauty, Ambiguity and Mortality

Yuri Kozyrev (Zorye Kolektiv)

Emilio Morenatti (Zorye Kolektiv)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (Repor Madrid TV)

Thurston Hopkins (Guardian) On his 100th birthday this week, one of the great photojournalists of the 20th century, Thurston Hopkins, talks about his career as a photographer at Picture Post

Pari Dukovic (Wonderland magazine)

Mike Brodie (LA Times Framework blog)

Danielle Levitt (Dazed Digital) Danielle Levitt’s Favourite Tribes

Mikko Takkunen is an associate photo editor at TIME.com.

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Too often the subjects of images of Africa seem to be reduced to symbols - viewers do not encounter them as fully rounded human beings, rarely seeing journalistic images of the middle class, artists or the cultural heritage of African countries. Peter DiCampo, with his iPhone, endeavors to address this.

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In the last week of June, at an airfield outside Moscow, Russia laid out a smorgasbord of military hardware—including everything from tanks to anti-aircraft batteries—and invited some of the most militaristic nations in the world do some pleasant summer shopping. Meat was grilled in barbecue pits, comely models stood around in mini-skirts, ’80s music and obnoxious techno pounded through the speakers, and once a day, a choreographer from the Bolshoi Theater staged a “tank ballet” of twirling war machines that was grandiloquently titled, “Unconquerable and Legendary.”

Welcome to the deceptively titled Forum for Technologies in Machine Building, the biennial Russian arms bazaar that President Vladimir Putin inaugurated in 2010. Delegations from Iran, Bahrain, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, among many others, attended the expo this year, and spent their time ogling cruise missiles, climbing into armored jeeps and trying out the most famous—and most deadly—Russian weapon of them all: the Kalashnikov assault rifle, which is thought to hold the stomach-turning honor of having killed more people than any other weapon in the history of man.

On the afternoon of June 28, TIME followed around the delegation to the arms bazaar from Syria, who, like many of the participants, would not legally be able to buy their weapons in the West (the TIME magazine story is available to subscribers here). For the past 16 months, Syrian forces loyal to President Bashar Assad have brutally tried to crush a homegrown rebellion, which has already cost around 15,000 lives, including thousands of women and children. The U.S. and Europe have responded by banning weapons sales to Syria, and along with their allies in the Arab world, they have pushed for an international arms embargo against Assad’s government. But Russia, the world’s second largest arms dealer after the U.S., has used its veto power in the U.N. to block these sanctions. With around $4 billion in weapons contracts to fulfill for its Syrian clients, Russia has continued supplying arms to Damascus, which gets nearly all of its weapons from Russia.

It was impossible to tell what, if anything, the Syrians came to the Moscow arms bazaar to purchase. Such deals would be signed behind closed doors, and both sides declined to comment. Colonel Isam Ibrahim As’saadi, the military attache at the Syrian embassy in Moscow, chaperoned the three officials in town from Damascus, and they would only say that they came to Moscow especially to attend the fair. The items that seemed to interest them most that day were armored military vehicles, trucks equipped with roof-mounted rocket launchers and brand new Kalashnikov assault rifles. Andrei Vishnyakov, the head of marketing for Izhmash, the company that created the AK-47, spent more than an hour selling them on the virtues of the firm’s new sniper rifles and machine guns. Before handing the head of the Syrian delegation a silencer-equipped AK-104, Vishnyakov said: “This weapon is perfect for close-quarters combat, house to house.” The Syrian official then lifted the gun’s sight to his eye and pointed it across the crowded pavilion, no doubt wondering how useful it could be back home.

Simon Shuster is TIME’s Moscow reporter.

Yuri Kozyrev is a contract photographer for TIME and was named the 2011 Photographer of the Year in the Pictures of the Year International competition.

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Events celebrating and protesting LGBT rights took place in many parts of the world in the last several months. Pride parades were met with violence or intimidation in Russia, Georgia, and Albania while other places saw wild street parties. Three million people celebrated on the streets of Sao Paulo, Brazil, often considered the biggest Pride event in the world. Activists in Uganda and Chile sought to change laws, while in the United States Barack Obama became the first American president to endorse same-sex marriage. Gathered here are pictures from events related to gay rights issues, LGBT Pride celebrations, and the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia. -- Lane Turner (39 photos total)
Mark Wilson carries a rainbow flag during San Francisco's 42nd annual gay pride parade on June 24, 2012. Organizers said more than 200 floats, vehicles and groups of marchers took part in the parade. (Noah Berger/Associated Press)

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TEDxSanDiego 2011 - Jakki Mohr - How Does Nature Do That?

For Jakki Mohr, the solution to pressing world problems can begin with a simple question: how does nature do that? Mohr explained how she helps businesses rethink their engineering tool kits to develop innovative, sustainable, eco-friendly products that deliver improved performance. Her presentation included real-world examples. These included wind turbines inspired by the scalloped edge of a humpback whale fin that increased energy production by 20%; buildings in Zimbabwe modeled on the airflow in termite mounds that require 90% less energy for cooling; and a soy-based water-resistant plywood adhesive based on the unique structure of a mussel shell. Mohr encouraged businesses to "bake biomimicry into their organizational DNA" and rethink their business models from a service-oriented rather than sales-oriented perspective.
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It seems fitting that Massimo Berruti was holed up in the Swat Valley in Pakistan for three months early this year, right around the time when dozens of other photographers were off shooting the Arab Spring. The war in the Pashtun tribal territories long predates this year’s conflicts—and is likely to last far longer too. The result of Berruti’s long stay, the exhibition and book Lashkars, is a powerful body of work of conflict photography, yet it has a more lasting feel than much of the work that’s emerged from this year’s tumult. That sense of permanence was the point of the commission, the second Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award, in what’s become an annual competition. The foundation says it aims to support in-depth photojournalism at a time of “a several financing crisis.”

Berruti, an Italian photographer represented by VU, based in Paris and Rome, has little interest here in the war on terror, American drone attacks or even, for that matter, death. The Lashkars are Pashtun civilian militia, which have fought the Taliban for control of their valley for years, with tacit acknowledgement of the Pakistan Army, yet with little concrete support. And it’s their grinding, even humdrum daily existence along the amorphous frontier land which intrigues him.

The black-and-white images are quiet and emotionally ambiguous. In one, a young man stands in front of the rubble of his parents’ home, aiming a rifle at the sky. Is he shooting at some invisible drone miles above? We don’t know. In fact, Berruti says, he’s an 18-year-old Pakistan-born Londoner called Jalal Khan, who’s returned to his village to marry a childhood friend. The rubble isn’t from a drone attack, but from Taliban fighters who’ve destroyed the family house in retaliation for the Khans’ anti-Taliban views. In another image, a child carries a tree branch past the bombed-out ruins of a Taliban commander’s house. But it’s not just a photo depicting a boy collecting firewood. The children are claiming back their neighborhood, by stripping the trees around the commander’s house. “It was a sign of freedom and emancipation,” Berruti says.

The exhibition’s textured portrayal of the area extends to the spectacular valley and mountains, which you might have expected Berruti—who loves shooting panoramas—to photograph. Instead, Berruti’s used his artist’s eye to offer something far more timeless: A painted mural of the landscape, which is pasted across the wall of a gas station. There’s a jagged crack down the side of the wall, a sign that this tourist idyll once known as Pakistan’s Switzerland is a deeply disputed place.

Despite the presence of guns and rifles everywhere, the conflict is off-stage. It’s so part of normal life that the business of fighting and killing hardly needs photographing. The story of war is instead etched into people’s faces, like the lined forehead of Saidbacha, the chief in Mahnbanr, who sits holding his pistol, gazing into the lens with what looks like a smirk. “He was the first to engage in battle against the Taliban before the Army arrived, and told me he’d killed four Taliban with his own hands,” Berruti says.

This was no easy world to penetrate, even for Berruti, who first traveled to the area in 2008. He kept secret his prize money—a whopping €50,000 ($68,000)—fearing that local chiefs might demand a cut in exchange for allowing him to work there. He also labored hard for permission to spend more than two weeks in the area, since Pakistan’s government suspected that any photographer opting to spend months there was surely up to no good. Berruti’s used his time well, depicting the long winter months when the Swat Valley is snowed in and isolated from the outside world. And the quiet moments appear to have been captured after weeks of Berruti winning the trust of locals and being able to melt into the background. As VU’s creator Christian Caujolle says in the forward to the book, there’s a feeling of “the photographer waiting.”

Given this intensely conservative area, it’s no surprise that women are completely absent from the exhibition—an unfortunate vacuum, given that Berruti focused so deeply on the Lashkars’ daily life. Berruti says he asked several times to photograph women, until he realized that “to continue to ask for this was putting me in a bad light.”

Finally, a disclaimer: I was a member of the jury for the first Carmignac award, which met in Paris in November, 2009. Led by William Klein, we sat around a conference table at the Ritz Hotel, poring over dozens of portfolios in search for a winner. After our discussion dragged on for hours, Edouard Carmignac—who heads the investment company and created the prize—finally walked over from his office on the Place Vendôme and suggested we continue over (what else?) a long lunch. He then listened intently to the discussion, enthralled at the excitement the prize had evoked. After hours of fine food and wine, Carmignac admitted to having his own favorite for winner, but insisted that the process was a “democracy,” in which he had no say. His prize is aimed at picking one photographer each year to spend months in an area which Carmignac believes is under-covered; the first year focused on Gaza, and the third commission is Zimbabwe. Despite the big prize, Carmignac is strangely not flooded with submissions; there are 76 submissions for the prize Berruti won, and fewer than that this year. In the introduction to Berruti’s book, Carmignac writes that photojournalism needs “lucidity and courage, a hardened character, and nerves of steel.” And sometimes, it needs backers like Carmignac.

Massimo Berruti is a photographer based in Paris and Rome. Lashkars is on vew at the Chapelle des Beaux-arts in Paris until December 3, 2011. See more of his work here.

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July’s first instalment of Photojournalism Links….Getting a bit sloppy..It’s Monday already again… Oh well…

First off… BJP reports that Iranian press photographer Maryam Majd is still being detained in the Evin prison for her work on women’s rights… ‘Photojournalists appeal for Iranian photographer’s release’ 

Some good news too…NYT: 2 French Journalists Freed by Afghan Militants 

Features and Essays 

One of my favourite photojournalists Shaul Schwarz had two, obviously, very strong pieces on TIME Lightbox last week…a series of stills and a short video, both related to this Narco Culture project…

Stills…

Shaul Schwarz: Mexico’s Ongoing Drug Violence (TIME LB: July 2011)

Video…

Shaul Schwarz: Aerial Drug Bust at the Mexican Border (TIME LB: July 2011)

Schwarz is releasing both a Narco Culture documentary and a book next year… Eagerly waiting for both of those… You can see the trailer on the project website here.

Sudan division nearing…

Tyler Hicks: Sudanese Seek Refuge from Bombing (NYT: July 2011)

Sarah Elliott: When Home is New (Sudan) (Newsweek: June 2011) Young Exiles Return to South Sudan

Happy birthday America…

I was following Magnum’s first Postcards from America road trip daily in May… There’s a selection of 100 photos on the agency’s website…

Photo: Alec Soth

Magnum Photos (various photographers):  Postcards From America (Magnum: June 2011)

Phil Bergerson:  Shards of America (TIME: July 2011)

Bruce Gilden: Fresno (Magnum in Motion: June 2011)

Antonin Kratochvil: In America (VII Magazine: July 2011)

Stuart Freedman: Delhi’s Army of Homeless (Panos: July 2011)

Mishka Henner: In a Foreign Land (Panos: July 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen: The Mapuche Indians (NOOR: June 2011) You can follow his ViaPanam blog here.

Afghanistan…

Gratiane de Moustier: Afghanistan in Transition (Reportage by Getty Images: June 2011)

Was reading Newsweek last week.. It had an article on President’ Obama’s dilemma relating to the economics of withdrawing troops from Afghanistan…Article was accompanied with two Rita Leister - Basetrack photos…see below…

Basetrack’s Photostream on Flickr

Gary Knight: Living with HIV (Burma) (VII: July 2011)

Really couldn’t enjoy viewing the below Dominic Nahr’s slideshow on the Magnum Emergency Fund website, but to no fault of the photographer…Either it’s my connection or bad website design..Every photo ‘loads’ separately and half of the time I was staring ‘a loading wheel’ going from 1% to 100% before seeing each of the images… Annoying..Hope it works better for you..

Dominic Nahr: The Unhealed Rift (Kenya) (Magnum Emergency Fund: June 2011)

Tomas van Houtryve: Laos: Open Secret (VII Network: July 2011)

Abbey Trayler-Smith: KO’d in Kabul (Panos: July 2011)

Stefano de Luigi: Ivory Coast (VII Network: July 2011)

Peter Marlow: Point of Interest (Magnum: July 2011)

Chris de Bode: When the Guns Fall Silent (Panos: June 2011)

Pierfrancesco Celada: Japan, I Wish I Knew Your Name (TIME LB: June 2011)

Jeremy Suyker: Jaffna: In the Aftermath of the Sri Lankan Civil War (Foto8: June 2011)

Muhammed Muheisen: Quiet, but Telling, Scenes in Pakistan (NYT Lens: June 2011)

Chloe Dewe Mathews: Banger Boys (Panos: July 2011)

Eivind Natvig: You Are Here (TIME LB: June 2011)

Articles

This week’s must read…. John Stanmeyer on pitching and planning a National Geographic photo essay…below a photo of Stanmeyer working..

Photo: Anil Chandra Roy

John Stanmeyer: The Amazing Yellow-Bordered Magazine (Photographer’s blog: June 2011)

I’d also like to recommend DuckRabbit’s post on war photographers… Make sure to read the comments…

DuckRabbit: The war photographer’s biggest story: themselves (Duckrabbit: June 2011)

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.19: Do local photographers have a distinctive eye? (DC Blog: June 2011)

I’d also recommend going back to David Campbell’s earlier post ‘Who’s Afraid of Home?’ to read some of the comments

PDN: 4 Questions to Ask Before Donating to a Charity Photo Auction (PDN: June 2011)

Jeremy Nicholl: The Photographer, The Entrepreneur, The Stockbroker And Their Rent-A-Mob (Photographer’s blog: June 2011)

NYT Lens: JR | Eyes on, and of, a South Bronx Community (NYT Lens: June 2011)

Guardian: Vanessa Winship’s Poetic Portraits (Guardian: June 2011)

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Urial Sinai (Guardian: June 2011)

Guardian: Steve McCurry : The Eyes Have It (Guardian: June 2011)

BJP: Stockpiling trouble: How the stock industry ate itself? (BJP: June 2011)

BJP: ICP graduate wins Humanitarian Visa d’Or award (BJP: June 2011)

Black Star Rising: The Photographer’s Life Should Start with Family (BSR: 2011)

Napa Valley Register: Windows XP desktop screen is a Napa image (Napa Valley Register: June 2011)

Interviews 

“I’m doing exactly what I want, and there are people paying me well to do it. It’s a fantastic life.” – Martin Parr

Martin Parr (Urban Outfitters: June 2011)

Lynsey Addario (Youtube: 2011)

Peter van Agtmael (e-photoreview: 2011)

Recommended….

University College Falmouth Press and Editorial Photography students have made an excellent Professional Profiles interview series…

Professional Profiles interviews pt 1 | pt 2 | pt 3 | pt 4

Elin Hoyland (e-photoreview: June 2011)

Seba Kurtis (C U Photography: June 2011)

Pierfrancesco Celada (Ameteur Photographer: June 2011)

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

The Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award offers €50,000 grant to develop a project in Zimbabwe | Article on BJP

Aftermath $20,000 grant for conflict photographers and a $5,000 grant for fixers & translators. | direct link to PDF

Jobs – Senior Photo Editor Daily Beast : NYC

Photographers – Stacy Kranitz

FacebookDuckRabbit

TwitterAndre Liohn

TwitterIvor Prickett

WebsitesSusan Bright

multiMedia - Love Issue

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SNAKE BOSS
SNAKE BOSS: Yang Hongchang, head of a snake rearing company, held a snake at a farm in Zisiqiao, China, Wednesday. Residents of Zisiqiao Village, also known as “snake town,” raise over 3 million snakes a year for food and medicinal purposes. (Aly Song/Reuters)

SMELLING FISHY
SMELLING FISHY: A buyer smelled a fish at Grimsby Fish Auction in Grimsby, England, Wednesday. Grimsby Fish Market is recognized as being one of the most important fish markets in Europe. (Bethany Clarke/Getty Images)

ATHENS CLASH
ATHENS CLASH: Protesters clashed with riot police during a demonstration against austerity measures near Parliament in Athens Wednesday. (Aris Messinis/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

IN SHEEP’S CLOTHING
IN SHEEP’S CLOTHING: Wool grader Stephen Kitson sorted wool in the British Wool Marketing Board’s depot in Bradford, U.K., Wednesday. Wool prices have surged 35% this year, joining rallies in other agricultural products such as grains. (Jason Alden/Bloomberg)

SIGNS UP
SIGNS UP: Members of the Communist Party of India held placards during a protest against corruption and price hikes in New Delhi Wednesday. (Adnan Abidi/Reuters)

PRAYER LINE
PRAYER LINE: Women prayed on the outskirts of Harare, Zimbabwe, Wednesday. (Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/Associated Press)

WATER UNDER THE BRIDGE
WATER UNDER THE BRIDGE: A Hubei University student walked on a bridge of chairs over a flooded path Tuesday in Hubei, China. Since June, flooding has left more than 170 people dead or missing. (Zuma Press)

OUT ON A LIMB
OUT ON A LIMB: A worker fixed an air conditioning unit without a safety belt Tuesday in Shaanxi Province, China. (Zuma Press)


CAN YOU HEAR US NOW? Korea Exchange Bank employees shouted slogans during a protest to oppose the sale of a controlling stake in their bank to Hana Financial Group in front of KEB’s headquarters in Seoul Wednesday. (Ahn Young-joon/Associated Press)

BRICK BY BRICK
BRICK BY BRICK: Syrian children walked over bricks stored for road repairs on the grounds of a refugee camp during an unplanned protest against Syrian President Bashar Assad Wednesday. The camp is located in Yayladagi ,Turkey near the Syrian border. (Vadim Ghirda/Associated Press)

WEB OF WIRES
WEB OF WIRES: Men worked on telephone cables hanging alongside electricity supply cables in a crowded market in New Delhi Wednesday. (Gurinder Osan/ Associated Press)

SEEKING SHELTER
SEEKING SHELTER: An Afghan asylum seeker on a hunger strike sat in a private Brussels home Wednesday. Ninety Afghan refugees have been on a hunger strike for 16 days to protest against the Belgian government’s decision to reject their asylum requests. (Yves Herman/Reuters)

BOOKWORMS
BOOKWORMS: Muslim girls learned how to read the Koran at a mosque in Peshawar, Pakistan, Wednesday. In a nation where Muslim extremists are slowly strengthening their grip on society, the number of all-female schools has boomed over the past decade. (Fayaz Aziz/Reuters)

ALL HANDS ON DECK
ALL HANDS ON DECK: South African Kings players, in white and green, faced off against Romanian players, in blue, during their IRB Nations Cup match in Bucharest, Romania, Wednesday. (Robert Ghement/European Pressphoto Association)

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SUITED UP
SUITED UP: The crew of a nuclear submarine participated in a drill in Murmansk, Russia, Friday. (Russian Look/Zuma Press)

PROTESTING IN PAKISTAN
PROTESTING IN PAKISTAN: Members of the Tehreek-e-Insaaf and Jamaat-e-Islami parties clashed with police Friday in Islamabad, Pakistan, as they protested against U.S. drone strikes and the release of CIA contractor Raymond Davis after he said he shot two men in self-defense. (Aamir Qureshi/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

MAN ON FIRE
MAN ON FIRE: An Israeli border police officer was engulfed by flames after a Molotov cocktail was thrown at him during clashes in the mostly Arab neighborhood of Silwan, East Jerusalem, Friday. Officials said the officer was only ‘slightly’ injured, but was taken to a hospital. (Ammar Awad/Reuters)

BAGS OF BONES
BAGS OF BONES: Workers bagged bones that were found in a mine in Gwanda, Zimbabwe, Tuesday. Local media reported that mass graves possibly containing thousands of bodies were found at the mine. (Zuma Press)

IN TRANSIT
IN TRANSIT: Ghanaians sat near garbage at a camp after leaving Libya, where pro-Gadhafi forces continued to shell Ajdabiya and Misrata, despite declaring a cease-fire Friday. (Joel Saget/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

BACK HOME
BACK HOME: Former Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide returned home Friday to Port-au-Prince, Haiti, after spending seven years in exile. Mr. Aristide immediately took a swipe at the decision to bar his political party from the country’s presidential election. (Alexandre Meneghini/Associated Press)

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