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Original author: 
Amid Amidi

The Annecy International Animated Film Festival, which concluded on June 15th, awarded its Cristal prize for feature to the Brazilian film, Rio 2096: A Story of Love and Fury. The festival’s Cristal for short film went to the NFB short Subconscious Password, a CG/pixilation effort by Oscar-winner Chris Landreth (Ryan).

The complete list of winners is below:


The Cristal for best feature
Rio 2096: A Story of Love and Fury
Directed by Luiz Bolognesi (Brazil)

The Cristal for best short
Subconscious Password
Directed by Chris Landreth (Canada)


The Cristal for best TV production
Room on the Broom
Directed by Jan Lachauer and Max Lang (Great Britain)


The Cristal for best commissioned film
Dumb Ways to Die
Directed by Julian Frost (Australia)

Feature Films: Special Distinction
My Mommy Is in America and She Met Buffalo Bill
Directed by Marc Boréal and Thibaut Chatel (France/Luxembourg)

Feature Films: Audience Award
O Apóstolo
Directed by Fernando Cortizo Rodriguez (Spain)

Short Films: Special Jury Award
The Wound
Directed by Anna Budanova (Russia)

Short Films: Distinction for a first film
Trespass
Directed by Paul Wenninger (Austria)

Short Films: Jean-Luc Xiberras Award for a first film
Norman
Directed by Robbe Vervaeke (Belgium)

Short Films: Special Distinction
The Triangle Affair
Directed by Andres Tenusaar (Estonia)

Short Films: Sacem Award for original music
Lonely Bones
Directed by Rosto (The Netherlands)

Short Films: Junior Jury Award
Feral
Directed by Daniel Sousa (USA)

Short Films: Audience Award
Lettres de femmes
Directed by Augusto Zanovello (France)

TV: Special Award for a TV series
Tom & The Queen Bee
Directed by Andreas Hykade (Germany)

TV: Award for best TV special
Poppety in the Fall
Directed by Pierre-Luc Granjon and Antoine Lanciaux (France)

Commissioned films: Special Jury Award
Benjamin Scheuer: “The Lion”
Directed by Peter Baynton (Great Britain)

Graduation Films: Award for best graduation film
Ab ovo
Directed by Anita Kwiatkowska-Naqvi (Poland)

Graduation Films: Special Jury Award
I Am Tom Moody
Directed by Ainslie Henderson (Great Britain)

Graduation Films: Special Distinction
Pandas
Directed by Matus Vizar (Slovakia)

Graduation Films: Junior Jury Award
Rabbit and Deer
Directed by Peter Vacz (Hungary)

Unicef Award
Because I’m a Girl
Directed by Raj Yagnik, Mary Matheson, and Hamilton Shona (Great Britain)

Fipresci Award
Gloria Victoria
Directed by Theodore Ushev (Canada)

Fipresci Special Distinction
Feral
Directed by Daniel Sousa (USA)

“CANAL+ creative aid” Award for a short film
Autour du lac
Directed by Carl Roosens and Noémie Marsily (Belgium)

Festivals Connexion Award – Région Rhône-Alpes with Lumières Numériques
Feral
Directed by Daniel Sousa (USA)

The Funniest Film according to the Annecy Public
KJFG No 5
Directed by Alexey Alekseev (Hungary)

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Original author: 
Russ Fischer

steven_spielberg-header

Earlier today we were talking about the anniversary of Jurassic Park, released on this day in 1993. But in mid-1990, director Steven Spielberg wasn’t yet set to film Michael Chrichton’s novel, which hadn’t been released. Having made Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Spielberg had grown up a bit with the romance Always, released six months after the third Indy picture, and was poised to take over another film related to growing up: 1991′s Hook.

So this 1990 interview catches Spielberg in what looks now like a transitional phase, before the staggering success of Jurassic Park and the first flowering of the digital effects age and the opening of the DreamWorks era. The director talks about many aspects of his career: his non-blockbuster choices (The Color Purple, Always, Empire of the Sun) and lack of Oscar nominations for some of his work. He talks about his desire to make Rain Man, which took director Barry Levinson to the Oscars in 1989, and which Spielberg directed before commitment to Indiana Jones interceded.

This is a candid half hour with a man who was already one of the biggest directors in the world, but who also has many successes in front of him. It’s a great conversation with which to cap off your afternoon.

[The Playlist]

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Original author: 
Dan Goodin


Thanks to the XKCD comic, every password cracking word list in the world probably has correcthorsebatterystaple in it already.

Aurich Lawson

In March, readers followed along as Nate Anderson, Ars deputy editor and a self-admitted newbie to password cracking, downloaded a list of more than 16,000 cryptographically hashed passcodes. Within a few hours, he deciphered almost half of them. The moral of the story: if a reporter with zero training in the ancient art of password cracking can achieve such results, imagine what more seasoned attackers can do.

Imagine no more. We asked three cracking experts to attack the same list Anderson targeted and recount the results in all their color and technical detail Iron Chef style. The results, to say the least, were eye opening because they show how quickly even long passwords with letters, numbers, and symbols can be discovered.

The list contained 16,449 passwords converted into hashes using the MD5 cryptographic hash function. Security-conscious websites never store passwords in plaintext. Instead, they work only with these so-called one-way hashes, which are incapable of being mathematically converted back into the letters, numbers, and symbols originally chosen by the user. In the event of a security breach that exposes the password data, an attacker still must painstakingly guess the plaintext for each hash—for instance, they must guess that "5f4dcc3b5aa765d61d8327deb882cf99" and "7c6a180b36896a0a8c02787eeafb0e4c" are the MD5 hashes for "password" and "password1" respectively. (For more details on password hashing, see the earlier Ars feature "Why passwords have never been weaker—and crackers have never been stronger.")

Read 52 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Original author: 
Amid Amidi

Everything I Can See From Here has a simple quality that is all too rare in animated filmmaking: mystery. As a viewer, I had no idea where the short was headed, but it was an engaging journey in which I was kept thoroughly engaged by the narrative skills of filmmakers Sam Taylor and Bjorn-Erik Aschim. They made the film as a personal project at the London-based collective The Line. It’s a timely piece, too, in that it serves as a reminder that hand-drawn animation is a vital art form that is evolving in exciting and fresh new directions.

CREDITS
Directed by Sam Taylor and Bjorn Aschim for The Line
Produced by Fritzi Nicolaus
Sound & Music by Box of Toys Audio

Animation:
Sam Taylor
Bjorn-Erik Aschim
Adam Hodgson
Alexander Petreski
Dante Zaballa
Geoff King
Hozen Britto
James Duveen
Jim Round
Kristian Antonelli
Tim McCourt
Wesley Louis

3D Modelling and Rigging
David Hunt

3D Modelling
Max Taylor

3D animation
Max James van der Merwe

Backgrounds
Bjorn-Erik Aschim

Compositing
Bjorn-Erik Aschim
Sam Taylor

Cleanup:
Adam Hodgson
Beth Witchalls
Caspar Rock
Clarice Elliott
Denise Dean
Freya Hotson
Hozen Britto
Hugh La Terriere
Isobel Stenhouse
Jessica Toth
Jose Saturno
Stewart Wagstaff
Tom Loughlin

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Short Peace is the name of Akira director Katsuhiro Otomo’s new omnibus feature comprised of four different shorts. It appears that Otomo’s Combustible, which qualified for Oscar consideration last year as a stand-alone short, will be part of the package.

Halcyon Realms points out the other directors who are involved in the project:

The four directors are Otomo himself, Morita Shuhei (Kakurenbo, Freedom Project), Hiroaki Ando (co-director of Tekkon Kinkreet) and Hajime Katoki (mecha designer for Gundam, Super Robot Wars, Virtua On, Patlabor and tons of other stuff.) Koji Morimoto has also been credited on the official page as the director of the film’s opening sequence.

The film’s website states that the film will premiere in Japan on July 20, 2013.

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