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TENDING TO A LOT
TENDING TO A LOT: Parking attendant Tyler Bounelis sat near an empty lot at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla., Monday. Heavy rain on Sunday forced Nascar to postpone the Daytona 500 to Monday, the first postponement in its 54-year history. (Phelan M. Ebenhack/Associated Press)

CONSOLED
CONSOLED: Samantha Kimball hugged her little brother, Daniel, after she picked him up from school in Chardon, Ohio, Monday. A teenager described as an outcast opened fire in the cafeteria of Chardon High School, killing one student and wounding four before being caught, authorities said. (David Maxwell/Corbis/Euoprean Pressphoto Agency)

TESTING, TESTING
TESTING, TESTING: A technician checked phone lines at the European Council headquarters in Brussels Monday. European Union leaders will gather there for a summit March 1-2. (Yves Herman/Reuters)

FIT TO PRINT
FIT TO PRINT: A man read the news Monday in Dakar, Senegal, as the country’s papers covered a presidential election. President Abdoulaye Wade said he expects a runoff; votes in 282 out of 551 districts showed him leading 13 opposition candidates with 32.17% of the vote. (Youssef Boudlal/Reuters)

OSCAR BLISS
OSCAR BLISS: Best actress winner Meryl Streep, of ‘The Iron Lady,’ and best actor winner Jean Dujardin, of ‘The Artist,’ posed with their Oscars at the 84th Academy Awards in Hollywood Sunday. (Joel Ryan/Associated Press)

AT THE WHITE HOUSE
AT THE WHITE HOUSE: Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn, a Democrat, wore a button reading ‘Cheer up’ as he listened to President Barack Obama give a speech during the National Governors Association meeting at the White House in Washington Monday. (Saul Loeb/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

TRADITIONAL GIRLS
TRADITIONAL GIRLS: Dongria Kondh tribal girls watched sacrifice rituals during the annual festival of Niyam Raja in Lanjigarh, India, Sunday. (Biswaranjan Rout/Associated Press)

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What is Page 2? Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 48 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. If you have any interesting items that we might’ve missed that you think should go in /Film’s Page 2 – email us!

Header Photo: Star Wars in Pixar’s Up-style.

CrinimalJustice lists the Top 10 Films Based on Real-Life Crimes

Video: The 50 Greatest Movie Freakouts

So how exactly is Disney World’s new xPASS system supposed to work?

Some Photos Surface from the Set of Ron Howard’s Rush

Back to the Future creator Bob Gale asks fans to help restore the original Back to the Future DeLorean.

Watch kids reenact to scenes from The Tree of Life, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, The Help, Moneyball, Midnight in Paris, THE DESCENDANTS, War HorseHugo and The Artist

ShortList lists Oscar-themed hot dogs.

Star Wars Parenting Decisions.

Taika Waititi has taken to Kickstarter to try to get a US release for his Sundance film Boy.

Continue Reading Page 2 >>

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Each January, Los Angeles is effervescent with anticipation, as the world’s biggest stars gather to participate in a flurry of parties, dinners and events in the walk-up to the Golden Globes, marking the beginning of the awards season. This year was no exception.

TIME’s annual Oscars portfolio showcases each year’s best performers through a portfolio of striking portraits. Tears, giggles, pranks and emotions ran high, and loads of laughter pealed through the studio during this year’s shoot, which resulted in a series of images and short films photographed and directed by Sebastian Kim. It was our most ambitious Oscars shoot yet. We had just three days to photograph and film 12 world-class actors during their busiest time of the year.

George Clooney arrived early on set, but it didn’t take long for the actor to settle in and begin joking around and planning pranks with Michael Fassbender, who had recently been photographed by Kim for the February issue of Interview magazine. This previous experience of working together made for a great rapport between them. And it wasn’t the only happy reunion on set: Viola Davis and Octavia Spencer happily embraced upon seeing each other on our set, giving us a glimpse of the fun these two had while working together on The Help. Later, Adepero Oduye was brought to tears when introduced by Joel Stein, who was on hand to interview the actors, to Davis, one of her greatest heroes. “It was so unbelievably Hollywood and yet really real,” Stein says.

Kim says that the project was the most star-studded he’s photographed so far. “I was quite excited photographing Meryl Streep,” he says, noting that his girlfriend is a big fan of the actress’s, “so naturally I was quite nervous when I met her. Being nervous on set is not a good thing as it impedes your concentration, but I just kept thinking, ‘My gosh…I better a get a good shot of her and make my girlfriend happy!’”

But Kim needn’t have been nervous. Streep was running a bit late, having arrived from a previous shoot with MGM studios, where she was taking part in a project to photograph the greatest living actors of our time. She was immediately forgiven—and how could she not be? Streep is kind and gracious, possesses a rare elegance and professionalism that made the photo shoot feel like anything but work. In fact, this set the tone for all of our actors’ portraits, which also included sittings with Brad Pitt, Jessica Chastain, Christopher Plummer, Michelle Williams, Rooney Mara, Jean Dujardin, as well as the adorable Uggie, the dog in The Artist.

It’s a rare pleasure to watch actors of this caliber play for the camera. Instead of characters, they play themselves, with a focus and passion that can only come from years of experience on set.

The performers’ interviews with Joel Stein can be viewed here.

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George Clooney discusses the best performance ever and the importance of Hawaiian shirts.

2011 performances: The Descendants and The Ides of March

Nominated: Best Actor for The Descendants

THE PERFORMERS SPEAK:


Jessica Chastain


George Clooney


Adepero Oduye


Viola Davis


Uggie


Michelle Williams


Brad Pitt


Rooney Mara


Christopher Plummer


Bérénice Bejo


Jean Dujardin


Octavia Spencer


Michael Fassbender


Highlights

 

To view TIME’s Oscars portfolio photo gallery, click here

To see more of TIME’s Oscar coverage, click here

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Michael Fassbender explains how physicality can define a character.

2011 Performances: Shame, A Dangerous Method, X-Men: First Class, Jane Eyre, Haywire

THE PERFORMERS SPEAK:


Jessica Chastain


George Clooney


Adepero Oduye


Viola Davis


Uggie


Michelle Williams


Brad Pitt


Rooney Mara


Christopher Plummer


Bérénice Bejo


Jean Dujardin


Octavia Spencer


Michael Fassbender


Highlights

 

To view TIME’s Oscars portfolio photo gallery, click here

To see more of TIME’s Oscar coverage, click here

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While photographer Anoek Steketee and writer Eefje Blankevoort traveled through Northern Iraq in 2006, researching a story on the Kurds and their efforts to create a united Kurdistan, they stumbled across a surreal scene amidst the daily reports of kidnappings and sectarian violence—an amusement park called Dream City, located on what was formerly a military base for Saddam Hussein. While outside the gates they may have been at war, inside the Disney-like park the pair saw Arabs and Americans, Christians and Muslims, Shiites and Sunnis peacefully rubbing shoulders while strolling around eating ice cream and popcorn, or waiting patiently in line for the bumper cars.

That visit spurred a four-year journey, documented in their series Dream City, through the world of carnies and Ferris wheels from Rwanda to Turkmenistan. The parks’ surreal fairy-tale settings, with perfectly manicured gardens in areas torn by genocide and ethnic clashes, showed the duo that the desire to escape from reality is a universal human need. Which was something America’s great creator of amusement parks, Walt Disney, based his empire on. “I don’t want the public to see the world they live in,” said Disney describing his parks, “I want them to feel they’re in another world.”

TIME‘s Alexander Ho spoke to Steketee about the project:

Did you ever encounter any sort of trouble from park security or local police? 

Most of the time, the management of the parks welcomed us. But there were some incidents. In Turkmenistan, the authorities are not so happy with western journalists. We went on a tourist visa to avoid any restrictions in our movements. After a few days working in the park we had to go with the security and hand over the material. Fortunately I was able to avoid giving it to them, but we were forced to stop photographing and were refused further access to the park. In Israel, it took me a few hours to convince the security that I was coming with all the equipment just to photograph amusement parks.

Are there plans to continue the project? Are there shows slated this year for Dream City to be exhibited—perhaps in America?

At the moment we are looking for the possibilities to bring it to the USA, and after that, to Colombia and the other places we visited for the project, like Israel and the Palestinian Territories, Lebanon, China and Indonesia. Also, in cooperation with FOTODOK, an educational program is being developed which we would like to bring with along with the exhibition.

What projects do you have coming up? 

Our next project is, among others, about a popular radio soap opera in Rwanda, which is a sort of Romeo and Juliet story situated in two villages in the countryside.

Dream City is published by Kehrer Verlag. More of Steketee’s work can be seen on her website at: www.anoeksteketee.com.

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Outside his studio in 19th-century Paris hung a sign that declared “documents pour artistes”—documents for artists—a statement that captured the modest intent of Eugène Atget. His legacy, the result of a career that spanned more than 30 years and nearly 8,500 photographs, is one of relentless curiosity, devout investigation and masterful craftsmanship. Drawing from its expansive collection of Atget’s work, the Museum of Modern Art in New York will present a selection of more than 100 images from Feb. 3 through April 9, as an exhibition titled with inspiration from the artist himself: Documents Pour Artistes.

The exhibition, which is divided into six sections, examines the various subjects the artist approached during his life. Atget is primarily known for his images of the streets of Paris, romantic landscapes and images of storefronts (which inspired Surrealists such as Man Ray and Tristan Tsara, although Atget denied any ties to the movement)—but, in this show, MoMA includes a refreshing display of his rare photographs of people, which are equal in their formal rigor and topographical, objective approach.

Atget’s approach is paradoxically both intimate and anonymous; despite having photographed seemingly every inch of the streets of Paris, from whole buildings to window displays, Atget never photographed the Eiffel Tower. His sense of dedication to detail, found in his street photographs, extends into his images from the abandoned Parc de Sceaux, from March and June of 1925. During this time, Atget took vast images of the serene landscapes, all while taking dutiful notes of times of day of the photographs, revealing his highly proximate relationship with documentation.

Drawing inspiration from Atget’s vision of objectivity for his photographs, it is perhaps best for viewers to develop a more personal relationship with his work, undistracted by the perceptions of the outside world. The scenes captured in Atget’s images cannot be adequately illustrated with words—luckily for us, he took pictures instead.

Documents Pour Artistes is on display from Feb. 3 through April 9 at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

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