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Bryan Denton

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Original author: 
Vaughn Wallace

Shared human experience.

That was the driving force behind photojournalist Chris Hondros’ work. Moments of humanity, brought into the light and into the consciousness of the greater public. His images — whether made within the baked-clay walls of a compound in Basra, the mold-blanketed alleys of post-Katrina New Orleans or the quiet glades of a snow-covered Central Park — reflected an innate desire to photograph the human world he saw unfolding around him. His work was deeply empathetic, a quality that allowed him to tell stories that lingered in viewers’ minds long after the page was turned. And Hondros’ staff position at Getty Images amplified his reach — his photos sent on the wire to thousands of publications around the world, with the potential to reach literally billions of eyes.

In April 2011, in the very midst of doing the hard, important work that he loved, Hondros’ life was cut short by a mortar round.

The Chris Hondros Fund, established in his name by his fiancée Christina Piaia and close friends, aims to “continue and preserve Hondros’ distinctive abilities to bring shared human experiences into the public eye.” Now in its second year, the Fund offers financial support to photographers who work in the same vein that Hondros did — with empathy, dedication and humility.

“This award recognizes and supports photojournalists who bring the news stories of our time into view,” says Piaia.

Today, the fund, in conjunction with Getty Images, gave Chilean photographer Tomás Munita the $20,000 award, citing his “fierce commitment to photojournalism and endless drive to tell a story.” Munita’s portfolio of work, shot in a wide variety of settings and locales, reflects a strong and nuanced grasp of the human condition. His photographs of refugees in Afghanistan, prisoners in El Salvador and daily life in Cuba all demonstrate just how in touch Munita is with the currents (and undercurrents) of life.

“I would like to express my gratitude,” Munita told TIME. “[This award] is not just a recognition. It is the means to keep working on personal projects, which I am definitely going to do.”

Photographer Bryan Denton was selected as a finalist for the 2013 award; the committee cited Denton’s “rare ability to capture both the complexities and daily life of those living in conflict and its aftermath with an unyielding commitment and intellectual curiosity.”

Bryan Denton

Bryan Denton

Libyan residents of Tripoli stormed through the Bab al-Azizia compound in search of weapons as a structure burned in the background. Aug. 23, 2011.

Previously, on the first anniversary of Hondros’ death after he was killed in Libya in 2011, the fund awarded $20,000 to NOOR photographer Andrea Bruce. Emerging photographer Dominic Bracco received a $5000 runner-up award.

Tomás Munita is a freelance photographer based in Santiago, Chile. He previously photographed Church and State: The Role of Religion in Cuba for TIME.

For more information on the Chris Hondros Fund, visit ChrisHondrosFund.org.

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Original author: 
Mikko Takkunen

Features and Essays

Kirsten Luce for the New York Times

Kirsten Luce for the New York Times

Kirsten Luce: A Border Evolves as Washington Pursues Immigration Reform (NYT)

Ricardo Cases: ¡Evangélicos! (LightBox) Intensity, Isolation, and Fiesta

Ilona Szwarc: The Cowgirl Way (NYT Magazine)

Peter Hapak: Portraits of the Gay Marriage Revolution (LightBox)

Jeff Brown: Bar Regulars (NYT Magazine) This Is Who Rules the Bars of New York

Nina Berman:  Stop-and-Frisk (Photo Booth)

Carlos Javier Ortiz: Too Young To Die (Pulitzer Center) Chicago’s Gang Violence

Shannon Stapleton: North Dakota Booming (Reuters)

Lisa Wiltse: Mary’s Pageant (Reportage by Getty Images)

Sebastian Liste

Sebastian Liste / Reportage by Getty Images

Sebastian Liste: In The Wake Of Chavez (Reportage by Getty Images)

Alvaro Ybarra Zavala: The Legacy of Venezuela’s Bolivarian Liberator (Reportage by Getty Images)

Jorge Cabrera: Death in the murder capital (Reuters) Honduras

Bryan Denton: Afghan Army Taking the Lead (NYT)

Bryan Denton: Hardships in Afghan Refugee Camps (NYT)

John D. McHugh: Observe The Sons of Afghan Marching Towards The War (Reportage by Getty Images)

Sebastião Salgado / Amazonas / Contact Press Images

Sebastião Salgado / Amazonas / Contact Press Images

Sebastião Salgado: Genesis (LightBox)

Adam Dean: Myanmar Grapples With Ethnic Tensions (NYT)

Sim Chi Yin: Fragile Lake (The Straits Times) Burma

Stephen Dock: Mali, the new gold rush (Agence Vu)

Marco Grob: International Mine Action Day: Portraits (LightBox)

Abbie Trayler-Smith: The Spring that Wasn’t (Panos) Yemen

Hatem Moussa: How to Make Charcoal in Gaza (TIME)

Andrea Bruce: Christians in Syria Celebrate Good Friday With Hope and Fear (NYT)

Kalpesh Lathigra: Za’atari refugee camp (The Independent) Syrian refugee crisis

Peter Hove Olesen: Assad (Politiken) Syria

Lynsey Addario / VII

Lynsey Addario / VII

Lynsey Addario: Mortal Beloved (New Republic) The extreme perils of motherhood in Sierra Leone

Diana Matar: Return to Libya (Photo Booth)

Karla Gachet and Ivan Kashinsky: Kings of the Roma (NYT Lens)

Tomas van Houtryve: No Man’s Land (The Foreign Policy) Exclusive photos from the 38th parallel.

Sergio Ramazzotti: North Korea: Inside the utopia (Parallelo Zero)

Evi Zoupanos: Acid Attack (zReportage) Bangladesh

Mike Brodie: A Period of Juvenile Prosperity (Guardian)

Gert Jochems: S (Agence Vu)

Matthieu Rytz: The Eroding Culture of Kuna Yala (NYT Lens) Panama

Stephen McLaren: Wading into weirdness on the street (NYT Lens)

Benjamin Lowy: The First Signs of Spring in Brooklyn (NYT Magazine)

Chad A. Stevens: West Virginia Mining (CNN photo blog)

David Kasnic: Rattlesnake Roundup: Texas style (CNN photo blog)

Benjamin Bechet: El Hierro (CNN photo blog) An ‘everlasting island’ | Spain

Articles

KCNA / AFP / Getty Images

KCNA / AFP / Getty Images

Detecting North Korea’s doctored photos (AFP Correspondent blog)

North Korea ‘Photoshopped’ marine landings photograph (The Telegraph)

War’s Bricolage (No Caption Needed)

Photographer Sebastião Salgado captures areas of Earth untouched by modern life (Metro)

Ron Haviv’s Bosnian War Images as Evidence in War Trials (NYT Lens)

Sebastian Junger Shoots for the Truth (Outside) Junger’s powerful new documentary about the life of war photographer Tim Hetherington shows us why dedicated journalists are needed now more than ever

HBO documentary on the life and death of conflict photographer Tim Hetherington premieres next month (The Verge)

Inside the War Machine: New Documentary Maps an Epic Photo Career (Wired Rawfile)

Famed photojournalist Robert Capa and the mystery of his “Mexican Suitcase” (Imaging Resource)

Edmund Clark: control order house (FT Magazine)

George Strock / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

George Strock / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

Photo That Was Hard to Get Published, but Even Harder to Get (NYT Lens) One of the most significant war photographs in American history is routinely taken for granted.

Syria’s Media War (The Daily Beast)

Fake Somali Pirates Scam Western Journalists (The Daily Beast)

At War with the Obvious: Photographs by William Eggleston (Photo Booth)

William Eggleston’s photographs of eerie Americana – in pictures (Guardian)

War reporting documentary wins prestigious Peabody Award (Star.com)

The girl in the 2011 Afghan bombing photograph (The Independent)

Snaps by Elliott Erwitt – review (Guardian)

Chim: Photography’s forgotten hero (The Jewish Chronicle)

Femen gets kick in the pants (but not on Facebook) (AFP Correspondent blog)

AP opens full news bureau in Myanmar (AP Big Story)

Photojournalists Move To Instagram, From Syria to Sandy (American Photo)

Traditional Photographers Should Be Horrified By The Cover Of Today’s New York Times (Business Insider)

NYT’s front-page Instagram: Maybe not the end of photography (Poynter)

Instagram and the New Era of Paparazzi (NYT)

Hyper-Realistic CGI Is Killing Photographers, Thrilling Product Designers (Wired)

Tim A. Hetherington

Tim A. Hetherington

The Guide: April 2013 Edition (LightBox) TIME LightBox presents a new monthly round-up of the best books, exhibitions and ways to experience photography beyond the web

The month in photography  (The Guardian) New exhibitions and books by William Eggleston, Sebastião Salgado, Kitra Cahana and Pieter Hugo are featured in this month’s guide to the best photography around the world.

Someone I Know (Someoneiknow.net)  Project bringing together some of the best known emerged and emerging photographers from across the globe. The brief for the photographers was to take a portrait of someone they know, no matter how loosely.

The Ethics of Street Photography (Joerg Colberg)

The Age of “Fauxtojournalism” (Chicago Tribune Assignment Chicago blog)

Bobby’s Book: Bruce Davidson’s Photographs of the Brooklyn Gang The Jokers (Photo Booth)

Magnum Photos approaches new audiences in deal with Vice magazine (British Journal of Photography)

MJR – Collection 100 / A history (Vimeo)

Review: Liquid Land by Rena Effendi (Joerg Colberg)

Uncharted Territories: Black Maps by David Maisel (LightBox)

Classical Portraits of Extreme Plastic Surgery (Slate Behold photo blog)

From Desert to City: A Photographer Unveils Forgotten Stars (LightBox)

Paul McDonough : Shooting film on the move (CNN photo blog)

A Look at the Pristine: Walter Niedermayr’s Aspen Series (LightBox)

Orlando Luis Pardo Lazo’s Photos From His Native Cuba (NYT Lens)

Larry Racioppo’s Photos of Good Friday Processions In Brooklyn (NYT Lens)

Gillian Laub : On Passover, Celebrating Life and Ritual in a Jewish Family (Slate Behold photo blog)

McNair Evans: Chasing hope on the railways (CNN photo blog)

Ahn Sehong : Comfort Women in China (NYT Lens)

Henri Huet / AP

Henri Huet / AP

An Expansive Exhibition of War Images at the Annenberg Space in Los Angeles (NYT Lens)

Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Joseph Rodriguez on the Audience Engagement Grant (PDN)

Crowd-Sourcing, Part One: Ask And You Shall Receive (NPPA)

The Photographer’s Guide to Copyright (PhotoShelter)

Featured photographer: Paolo Patrizi  (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: Abbie Trayler-Smith (Firecracker)

Judge Rules William Eggleston Can Clone His Own Work, Rebuffing Angry Collector (Artinfo)

Judge Rules William Eggleston Can Clone His Own Work (Joerg Colberg)

How Joachim Brohm set the world of landscape photography on fire (The Guardian)

Thoughts on the TIME Gay Marriage (or, Gay Sex?) Covers (BagNewsNotes)

Can 20×200 Be Saved? Anger From Collectors Mounts as Leading Art Site Flounders (Artinfo.com)

Henry Groskinsky / Time & Life Pictures / Getty Image

Henry Groskinsky / Time & Life Pictures / Getty Images

The Day MLK Was Assassinated: A Photographer’s Story  (LIFE) On April 4, 1968, LIFE photographer Henry Groskinsky and writer Mike Silva, on assignment in Alabama, learned that Martin Luther King, Jr., had been shot at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis. The two men jumped into their car, raced the 200 miles to the scene of the assassination

Photographer Who Shot Beatles Concert With a Fake Press Pass Sells the Pics for $45K (PetaPixel)

Camera Finds Way Back to Owner After Drifting 6,200 Miles from Hawaii to Taiwan (PetaPixel)

Photographer Accuses Getty of Loaning Images to CafePress Instead of Licensing Them (PetaPixel)

Photographing a Mother’s Descent Into Mental Illness (Mother Jones)

Review: Tales of Tono by Daido Moriyama (Joerg Colberg)

The new war poets: the photographs of Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin (The Telegraph)

LaToya Ruby Frazier Photography at Brooklyn Museum (NYT)

Makoko exhibition opens a window on a Nigerian world (The Guardian)

Distance & Desire: Encounters with the African Archive (Photo Booth)

Rene Burri in colour (BBC)

Helmut Newton Book ‘World Without Men’ Returns (The Daily Beast)

Interviews and Talks

Dominic Nahr / Magnum Photos

Dominic Nahr / Magnum Photos

Dominic Nahr (Leica blog) Recording History for Posterity

Sebastião Salgado (Monocle Radio) Salgado interview starts at 13 minutes into the show

Mike Brodie (Guardian) On his freight train photographs: ‘It’s a romantic life, at least in the spring and summer’

Andrew DeVigal (Wired RawFile blog) Smart Readers Are Too Distracted to Dig Smart Content

Carlos  Javier Ortiz (CBS News) Photographer brings Chicago gun violence into sharp focus | slideshow on CBS News website 

Jenn Ackerman (Slate Behold photo blog) Trapped: The Story of the Mentally Ill in Prison

Farzana Wahidy (NPR) How A Female Photographer Sees Her Afghanistan

Andrea Bruce / The New York Times

Andrea Bruce   / The New York Times

Andrea Bruce (NOOR) My first day in Damascus

Steve McCurry (Vice)

Raghu Rai (Visura Magazine)

Mohamed Abdiwahab (LightBox Tumblr)

Bert Stern (LightBox)  The Original ‘Mad Man’

Duane Michaels (Bomb blog)

Gregory Crewdson (The Telegraph) Gregory Crewdson’s silent movies

Maika Elan (Vietnam News)

Lisa Rose (The Chicago Tribune Assignment Chicago blog) The Goals of PhotoPhilanthropy

Shannon Jensen (The Daily Pennsylvanian) No ‘fancy pictures’, just tell the story

Alice Proujansky (The Guardian) Alice Proujansky’s best photograph – childbirth in the Dominican Republic

Camille Seaman (Piper Mackay Photography)

 Zhe Chen (Le Journal de la Photographie)

Guillem Valle (Leica blog) Transporting The Viewer Through Photographs

Stanley Forman (Boston Globe) Photojournalist Stanley Forman on his new book

Bill Armstrong (Aperture)

Thomas Ruff (Aperture)

Misha Friedman (Dazed Digital)

John Kilar (Dazed Digital)

Daniel Cronin (Dazed Digital)

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

Upcoming Deadlines for Grants, Fellowships Up to $10,000 (PDN)

PROOF : Award for Emerging Photojournalists  : Deadline May 1, 2013

NPPF Scholarship : Deadline April 15, 2013

Lens Culture student photography awards 2013 : Deadline April 15, 2013

72nd Annual Peabody Awards: Complete List of Winners (Peabody)

Best of Photojournalism 2013 Multimedia Winners

Photographic Museum of Humanity 2013 Grant Winners

William Eggleston to receive Outstanding Contribution to Photography award (British Journal of Photography) Also on The Guardian here.

Mikko Takkunen is an associate photo editor at TIME.com.

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Syria has always been a tough place to cover for journalists. Confidently authoritarian with a ruthlessly formidable security and intelligence apparatus, Syria has long been one of the most policed of Arab police states. So when some Syrians defied their government to take to the streets in the southern city of Dara‘a in March 2011, the temptation to cover the story was overwhelming for many, including myself.

The story of the Syrian uprising is ultimately the tale of regular citizens silencing the policeman in their heads, breaking their own personal barriers of fear to speak, to demonstrate, to demand, to reject, to no longer be afraid, to live in dignity. It’s about what these people will do, what they will endure, and what they are prepared to become to achieve their aims.

It is also the story of a significant portion of the population that considers the regime of President Bashar Assad the country’s best option, because they believe in its Baathist secular ideology or directly benefit from its patronage or don’t have confidence in Assad’s opponents and fear what may come next. Understanding what this segment of the population will accept in terms of state violence, the narratives they choose to believe and their concerns is a critical component of the story, though one that is harder to obtain, given the paucity of press visas issued by Damascus.

The only way to tell the Syrian story, really tell it, is to be on the ground with the men, women and children who are central to it, whether in Syria on in the neighboring states that many Syrians have fled to. It isn’t easy to do — the Committee to Protect Journalists, based in New York City, has dubbed Syria the “most dangerous place for journalists in the world” — but it is essential. Nothing beats being there. There is no compensating for seeing, feeling, touching, capturing, living the story.

The images here are a testament to the power of being on the ground, of sharing and capturing a moment for posterity, of translating an element of a person’s life through imagery.

Take a look at the photos. Can you place yourself in these situations? Can you imagine what it must be like? What do you feel when you look at the images? Are you drawn into them, or are you repulsed? Can you relate to them, or are they too alien? This is the power of translating on-the-ground reporting to an audience. This is why we must and will continue to document the Syrian uprising from inside the country when we can, and we — members of the foreign press corps — are not alone. Sadly, as is often the case, local journalists (both professional and citizen) have disproportionately borne the brunt of the casualties in this crisis. Still, this story is not about members of the media and what we go through to tell it; it’s about the Syrians who entrust their testimonies, their experiences, their hopes, their fears, their images to us in the hope that they will help explain what is happening in one of the most pivotal states in the Middle East.

—Rania Abouzeid

This collection of testimonies is the third in a series by TIME documenting iconic images of conflict. See “9/11: The Photographs That Moved Them Most” and “Afghanistan: The Photographs That Moved Them Most” for more.

Abouzeid is a Middle East correspondent for TIME. Reporting by Vaughn Wallace.

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From muddy fishing in India to wading through an animal fat spill in Houston, Texas, take a look back at a few of The Wall Street Journal’s most memorable images of 2011. (See the complete version of Photos of the Year 2011).

Photo by David Degner for The Wall Street Journal.

A woman standing in the moonroof of a car held up a flag as people gathered in Alexandria, Egypt, Feb. 11 to celebrate the announcement that President Hosni Mubarak would step down. More: In a Flash, Alexandria Erupts in Mass Jubilee.

Photo by Sanjit Das/Panos for The Wall Street Journal.

Children and adults who belong to the Chowduli community looked for small fish in the muddy remains of a pond in Kuliadanga village in India on Dec. 1. More: For India’s Lowest Castes, Path Forward is ‘Backward’.

Photo by Jesse Neider for The Wall Street Journal.

Tom Chase, left, helped his uncle, Richard Filipelli, break down the remains of his house on Cozy Avenue in East Haven, Conn., on Aug. 29 after Tropical Storm Irene swept through. More: Northern Landfall Puts Storm on Map

Photo by Joel van Houdt for The Wall Street Journal.

Women and children lay in the street minutes after a bomb went off near crowds of worshippers in Kabul, Afghanistan, Dec. 6, killing dozens. More: Attacks Point to New Afghan Conflict.

Photo by Mustafah Abdulaziz for The Wall Street Journal.

Sherry Vargson, of Granville Summit, Pa., can light a match at her kitchen tap and see an orange flame flare out of the faucet. State regulators attribute the methane contamination to natural-gas drilling. More: Drillers Face Methane Concern.

Photo by Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal.

Trin Bostick, right, and Jen Cinclair waited to be married outside the city clerk’s chapel in the Queens borough of New York on July 24, the first day same-sex marriage became legal in the state. More: For Same-Sex City Couples, Day 1 of ‘I Do’.

Photo by Michael Stravato for The Wall Street Journal.

A worker waded through animal fat on Jan. 5 after 15,000 gallons of it spilled from a Jacobs Stern & Sons storage tank along the Houston Ship Channel. The fat made its way through the storm drains to the channel. More: Houston Ship Channel Closed After Animal-Fat Spill.

Photo by Keith Bedford for The Wall Street Journal.

Cotton farmer Yu Feng sat Jan. 28 with cotton he was storing in his home in the town of Huji in the Chinese province of Shandong. Despite record cotton prices in 2010, some farmers were storing their harvests, hoping further rises could cover the high cost of fertilizer and labor. More: Chinese Take a Cotton to Hoarding.

Photo by Gilles Sabrie for The Wall Street Journal.

Shoe-factory workers enjoyed a break at a fair in Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, China, Nov. 1. Slowing exports amid world economic woes hit the city — the birthplace of China’s private sector — hard. More: Wenzhou’s ‘Annus Horribilis’ Shakes China.

Photo by Blake Gordon for The Wall Street Journal.

Victor Maceyra, a quadriplegic, said a Medicare-Medicaid disagreement meant an extra six months living in a rehab center after he finished therapy for a shoulder injured in an accident with his wheelchair. More: Overlapping Health Plans Are Double Trouble for Taxpayers.

Photo by Bryan Denton for The Wall Street Journal.

From left, Sgt. James Hamelin, 24; Sgt. Trentin Wilson, 24; and Lance Cpl. Seth Voie, 23, rested and talked Feb. 9 at Patrol Base Hernandez in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, after returning from a patrol. More: Rx for Combat Stress: Comradeship.

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