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adelman.jpegIf you want to get your indie game onto Nintendo's platforms -- the Wii U and 3DS -- you'll want to talk to Dan Adelman, who works as the company's liaison with indies.

While his title is "business development manager," he's best known as the man who helped World of Goo and the Bit.Trip series, among many others, land on the WiiWare service for the original Wii. He joined Nintendo in 2005 to help build that service; Since then, the company has transitioned to new platforms, and offers a much better shop on them, called the eShop.

The abovementioned games were notable successes. Some other developers, however, later spoke out against Nintendo's policies and practices, and shared dismal sales numbers for WiiWare titles. The company has quietly been changing its policies, but has had a difficult time getting the word out.

As GDC begins, in this extensive interview, Adelman fills Gamasutra in on exactly what indie developers want to know about releasing a game on the Wii U and 3DS.

Let's state this simply, to start. Is it possible for an indie to get a game onto the eShop service right now?

Dan Adelman: You know, it's crazy that there are so many developers who don't realize this, but yes, it is not only possible for an indie to get a game onto the eShop service, we've tried to make it as frictionless as possible.

Developers have always been able to make their content available on our systems since the WiiWare days, without the need for an intermediary publisher between the developer and Nintendo. Nor do they need to mount a big PR campaign just to be allowed onto the service. Our philosophy is that if you believe enough in your game to build it, we want to do what we can to support you.

Do developers need to be registered Nintendo developers? What does that entail?

DA: Yes, they do need to become licensed Nintendo developers, since they will need access to our development tools. It's actually pretty easy to become a licensed developer. We really have only a few requirements to sign up as a licensed developer with Nintendo. The most notable ones are that you have to have some experience making games, you have to be able to keep any confidential materials like dev kits secure and you have to form a company. None of these should be prohibitive to any indie developer.

In the past, you've required developers to have an office, but many indies work from home or are individuals. Is this policy changing?

DA: So that second requirement -- the ability to keep confidential materials secure -- was originally defined in terms of an office that was separate from the home. Back when that rule was created, that seemed to be an appropriate way of defining things.

As you point out, more and more people are working from home, and we recognize that developers are forming virtual teams around the world. I know we've shied away from talking about these things publicly in the past, so I'm glad that I can officially confirm that the office requirement is a thing of the past.

I've heard from developers that to publish on your services, they need an address in the territory in question, for example a Japanese address. I've even heard that Canadian developers need a U.S. address to publish in the U.S. Can you explain what's going on here?

DA: That's actually not the case. Anyone from any country can make their games available on the eShop within the NOA and NOE region -- i.e., pretty much everywhere outside of Japan.

Steam is the obvious market leader here. Developers are used to Valve's functionality, like sales, preorders, preloads, and painless patching. Can you talk about your plans around these four aspects of your service?

DA: Developers set their own pricing for their Wii U and Nintendo 3DS content. As one example, Little Inferno launched at $14.99. They did a sale for $9.99, and it went so well, they decided to make that price change permanent. It's completely in their control.

Updating games is also fairly straightforward. If they find an issue they need to fix, they can. In terms of other Nintendo eShop functionality, there's a dedicated team working through a roadmap of new features. We'll be able to announce those as they get closer to release.

What kind of outreach are you doing on the tools side, since Nintendo platforms require custom dev kits?

DA: Dev kits are actually not all that expensive. They're about the price of a high-end PC. Nothing that should be a showstopper for anyone.

There are a number of really exciting things going on in this space right now. We recently announced that we're providing Unity Pro 4 for Wii U to licensed developers at no added cost. So if a developer is currently working on a game in Unity and has a Wii U dev kit, it should be super easy to bring that game over to the Wii U console -- and not just do a straight port but also take advantage of any features of the console they want, like motion controls, Miiverse or of course the second-screen GamePad controller. Or vice versa -- making a game for Wii U and then going to other platforms should also be seamless.

In addition, at GDC we're going to be talking about some new tools we're rolling out for developers to use HTML5 and JavaScript to make games. The thing I'm most excited about for this is how easy it is to prototype new game ideas to find the fun quickly and easily.

Is someone who's licensed to publish to the eShop for 3DS also capable of going to the Wii U and vice versa, or are these separate?

DA: The process and policies are virtually identical. If they're licensed developers for one, it's a fairly straightforward process to become a licensed developer on other systems.

What's your payment schedule like? Indies need quick and frequent payment. Have you changed your policy, which previously didn't pay out until a game crossed a 6000 unit threshold? What about frequency? Quarterly or monthly?

DA: We tend not to talk about business terms, since those are considered confidential. That said, the unit threshold is something that's been a problem for a lot of developers, so I'd like to address it head on.

Let me give you a sense of the thought process behind the threshold in the first place. Even as far back as the early WiiWare days, we allowed developers to forgo the need to hire an intermediary publisher to get their content on our system. We didn't believe that Nintendo should screen game concepts. That should be up to the developer who's making the investment. Instead, we wanted to have a mechanism that would encourage developers to self-police their own game quality.

The threshold was thought to be a convenient way to go about it. Unfortunately, some great games that just didn't find an audience wound up being penalized. So for all systems after WiiWare -- DSiWare, Nintendo 3DS eShop, and Wii U eShop, we decided to get rid of the thresholds altogether. Developers receive revenue from unit 1.

Has working with indies like Vblank, Nicalis, and Gaijin Games helped change your tune? Have you been taking feedback from your existing stable of developers on board?

DA: Absolutely. I like to think we've built up a relationship of trust with a lot of the developers on our system, so they know they can say whatever's on their mind. And not just when they have an issue that needs to be resolved, either. We try to take a proactive stance with developers and solicit feedback from time to time. How can our development tools be better? What kind of functionality do you want to see in the eShop? How can we improve our processes to make life easier? I kind of see a big part of my role as representing the indie community inside Nintendo to make sure that we can make our systems as friendly as possible.

How are you on responsiveness? Nintendo has a reputation for having a lot of corporate overhead -- how do you get indies the things they need quickly?

DA: A lot of our processes were originally created in an environment where there was a set number of large publishers who had employees on staff whose sole job was to interface with the different console platforms. Those people had to learn how we were organized and know who to call for what issue. That obviously doesn't work for smaller developers.

As a result, we've narrowed everything down to a single point of contact -- one alias that developers can write to for any issue. There's a core team at Nintendo who then tracks down the information and follows up. We have an internal goal of getting every question a response within 24 hours. And if we can't get an answer in 24 hours, we at least will let them know when we expect to be able to get them what they need.

What kind of editorial staff do you have working on the eShop (both platforms), to make sure good games get featured prominently? I've noticed changes there, but can you outline how that works to some extent?

DA: We really try to make sure that we're not setting Nintendo up as the arbiter of what is a good game. That's for the market to decide. We try to give visibility to every new game when they launch. The nice thing about the Nintendo eShop is that we have a lot of flexibility on this point. We can make adjustments without much lead time. Beyond that, we look to things like user ratings, review scores, and in the case of Wii U, Miiverse activity to see how people are responding to certain games.

That said, there are a few times when we do take a little editorial license. Sometimes there's a game that we recognize is a great game for a niche audience or is trying something so new that people may not get it right away. In those cases, even if a game doesn't have big numbers right away, we want to make sure that we give it time to find its audience.

To me, one of the best things about the indie scene is its willingness to try out new ideas and take risks. If someone is attempting something that has never been tried before, I want to do everything I can to support that. Little Inferno is a great example of that -- a game about buying things and burning them! When Kyle Gabler from Tomorrow Corporation told me about the idea a few years ago, my response was that I loved the fact that I could not imagine what that game would turn into. As an industry, we need more of that!

And let's not forget about Unkle Dill, the dancing pickle in Runner 2. So very, very awesome.

Any stats or comment on what portion of your audience has downloaded an independently-developed game from the eShop, on both platforms?

DA: I can't give out any specific numbers, but developers seem to be pretty happy with the sales numbers they're seeing for their games.

Nintendo platforms are unique. If a game is going to feature very Nintendo-specific functionality (e.g. 3DS dual-screen play, GamePad play on Wii U) will you consider working more closely with a developer on their vision?

DA: It's great when developers see the features of our platform and decide to build around those as pillars for their game. Mutant Mudds by Renegade Kid did this brilliantly. In many respects, it was a traditional 2D platformer, but it was designed around the 3D functionality of the Nintendo 3DS. It was one of the first games that used depth of view as a game mechanic.

Fractured Soul by Endgame Studios is another great example. That whole game was designed around the dual-screen functionality of Nintendo 3DS. One of the core mechanics is to switch back and forth between the two screens, keeping an eye on both at the same time.

That said, it's really important that developers see these platforms features as opening up new design options for them. They should never feel obligated to tack on a feature if it doesn't make sense. It's completely up to the designer to figure out what's best for the game. Because making great games is what it's all about.

For sister site Gamasutra's full GDC 2013 event coverage this week, check out the official GDC 2013 event page.

[Christian Nutt wrote this article originally for Gamasutra]

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tommy refenes sm.jpgBy Tommy Refenes

I think I can safely say that Super Meat Boy has been pirated at least 200,000 times. We are closing in on 2 million sales and assuming a 10% piracy to sales ratio does not seem unreasonable. As a forward thinking developer who exists in the present, I realize and accept that a pirated copy of a digital game does not equate to money being taken out of my pocket. Team Meat shows no loss in our year end totals due to piracy and neither should any other developer.

For the sake of argument, some of those people that did pirate Super Meat Boy could have bought the game if piracy didn't exist but there is no actual way to calculate that lost revenue. It is impossible to know with certainty the intentions of people. With the SimCity fiasco and several companies trying to find new ways to combat piracy and stating piracy has negatively affected their bottom line I wonder if they've taken the time to accurately try to determine what their losses are due to piracy.

My first job outside my parents cabinet shop was at KMart. KMart, like countless other retailers, calculates loss by counting purchased inventory and matching it to sales. Loss is always built into the budget because it is inevitable. Loss could come from items breaking, being stolen, or being defective. If someone broke a light bulb, that was a calculable loss. If someone returned a blender for being defective, it wasn't a loss to KMart, but a calculable loss to the manufacturer. If someone steals a copy of BattleToads, it's a loss to KMart.

All loss in a retail setting is calculable because items to be sold are physical objects that come from manufacturers that have to be placed on shelves by employees. You have a chain of inventory numbers, money spent and labor spent that goes from the consumer all the way to the manufacturer. A stolen, broken, or lost item is an item that you cannot sell. In the retail world your stock is worth money.

In the digital world, you don't have a set inventory. Your game is infinitely replicable at a negligible or zero cost (the cost bandwidth off your own site or nothing if you're on a portal like Steam, eShop, etc). Digital inventory has no value. Your company isn't worth an infinite amount because you have infinite copies of your game. As such, calculating worth and loss based on infinite inventory is impossible. If you have infinite stock, and someone steals one unit from that stock, you still have infinite stock. If you have infinite stock and someone steals 1 trillion units from that stock , you still have infinite stock. There is no loss of stock when you have an infinite amount.

Because of this, in the digital world, there is no loss when someone steals a game because it isn't one less copy you can sell, it is potentially one less sale but that is irrelevant. Everyone in the world with an internet connection and a form of online payment is a potential buyer for your game but that doesn't mean everyone in the world will buy your game.

Loss due to piracy is an implied loss because it is not a calculable loss. You cannot, with any accuracy, state that because your game was pirated 300 times you lost 300 sales. You cannot prove even one lost sale because there is no evidence to state that any one person who pirated your game would have bought your game if piracy did not exist. From an accounting perspective it's speculative and a company cannot accurately determine loss or gain based on speculative accounting. You can't rely on revenue due to speculation, you can't build a company off of what will "probably" happen. Watch "The Smartest Guys in the Room" and see how that worked out for Enron.

Companies try to combat piracy of their software with DRM but if loss due to pirated software is not calculable to an accurate amount does the implementation of DRM provide a return on investment? It is impossible to say yes to this statement. Look at it as numbers spent in a set budget. You spend $X on research for your new DRM method that will prevent people from stealing your game. That $X is a line item in accounting that can be quantified. Can you then say "This $X we put into research for our DRM gained us back $Y in sales"? There is no way to calculate this because it is not possible to quantify the intentions of a person. Also, there's no way of accurately determining which customers would have stolen the game had there not been DRM.

To add to that, the reality of our current software age is the internet is more efficient at breaking things than companies are at creating them. A company will spend massive amounts of money on DRM and the internet will break it in a matter of days in most cases. When the DRM is broken is it worth the money spent to implement it? Did the week of unbroken DRM for your game gain you any sales from potential pirates due to the inability to pirate at launch? Again, there is no way of telling and as such cannot be used as an accurate justification for spending money.

So what should developers do to make sure people don't steal games? Unfortunately there is nothing anyone can do to actively stop their game from being pirated. I do believe people are less likely to pirate your software if the software is easy to buy, easy to run, and does what is advertised. You can't force a person to buy your software no more than you can prevent a person from stealing it. People have to WANT to buy your software, people have to WANT to support you. People need to care about your employees and your company's well being. There is no better way to achieve that than making sure what you put out there is the best you can do and you treat your customers with respect.

Lets loop back to what's going on with SimCity. I bought SimCity day one, I played it and experienced the same frustrations that countless others are experiencing. For total fairness, I know the always on DRM isn't the main issue, but I can't help but think that the server side calculations are a "wolf in sheep's clothing" version of DRM. I won't claim to know the inner workings of SimCity and this isn't a Captain Hindsight article because that is irrelevant. EA and Maxis are currently facing a bigger problem than piracy: A growing number of their customers no longer trust them and this has and will cost them money.

After the frustrations with SimCity I asked Origin for a refund and received one. This was money they had and then lost a few days later. Applying our earlier conversation about calculable loss, there is a loss that is quantifiable, that will show up in accounting spreadsheets and does take away from profit. That loss is the return, and it is much more dangerous than someone stealing your game.

In the retail world, you could potentially put a return back on the shelf, you could find another customer that wants it, sell it to them and there would be virtually no loss. In the digital world, because there is no set amount of goods, you gain nothing back (one plus infinity is still infinity). It's only a negative experience. A negative frustrating experience for a customer should be considered more damaging than a torrent of your game.

Speaking from my experience with SMB, I know for a fact we have lost a lot of trust from Mac users due to the Mac port of SMB being poor quality. I could go into the circumstances of why it is the way it is but that is irrelevant...it's a broken product that is out in the public. We disappointed a good portion of our Mac customers with SMB and as a result several former customers have requested and received refunds. I'd take any amount of pirates over one return due to disappointment any day.

Disappointment leads to apathy which is the swan song for any developer. If people don't care about your game, why would people ever buy it? When MewGenics comes out, I doubt many Mac users are going to be excited about our launch. When EA/Maxis create their next new game how many people are going to be excited about it and talking positively about it? I imagine that the poison of their current SimCity launch is going to seep into potential customers thoughts and be a point of speculation as to "Is it going to be another SimCity launch?".

This is not a quantifiable loss of course, but people are more likely to buy from distributors they trust rather than ones they've felt slighted by before. Consumer confidence plays a very important role in how customers spend money. I think its safe to say that EA and Maxis do not have a lot of consumer confidence at this point. I think its also safe to say that the next EA/Maxis game is going to be a tough sell to people who experienced or were turned away by talk of frustration regarding SimCity.

As a result of piracy developers feel their hand is forced to implement measures to stop piracy. Often, these efforts to combat piracy only result in frustration for paying customers. I challenge a developer to show evidence that accurately shows implementation of DRM is a return on investment and that losses due to piracy can be calculated. I do not believe this is possible.

The reality is the fight against piracy equates to spending time and money combating a loss that cannot be quantified. Everyone needs to accept that piracy cannot be stopped and loss prevention is not a concept that can be applied to the digital world. Developers should focus on their paying customers and stop wasting time and money on non-paying customers. Respect your customers and they may in turn respect your efforts enough to purchase your game instead of pirating it.

[Tommy Refenes wrote this on sister site Gamasutra's free community blogs.]

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qwopsmall.jpgBennett Foddy, creator of QWOP, GIRP, and CLOP among others, likes to play with his players, and he suggests that more of us should be doing the same.

At the top of his talk at IndieCade on Friday, he asserted, "I'm going to try to convince you to put more suffering in your games."

Learn a lesson from the Olympics, he says - it's all about the suffering. It's all about the pathos of second place.

"Nobody cries when they come second in a video game," he notes. "Nobody lays down and cries. Why not?"

In track and field video games, "The way that you run is to either hammer a button really fast, or waggle a joystick really fast," he says. "There's no joy in that, the joy is in the panic - in your friends watching you injure yourself as you hit the button."

"It's not just that games are easier - though they are," he says. "To me it's that games these days are more comfortable. There's less discomfort. My worry is not that games are getting too easy, because easy games can be wonderful. My worry is that games are getting too comfortable."

What's so good about suffering anyway? "When you're suffering in a game, it makes failure matter," he says. Counter-Strike uses boredom. If you fail, you have to just watch everyone else play, but frustration is more widely used.

"It makes success matter if there's suffering in the game," Foddy says. If you get to the end, you feel like this huge weight has been lifted. Thus, "this talk is a love letter to games that put you through Hell just for the sake of it," he says, "because we enjoy the suffering itself."

"Often when I start designing a game, I start by thinking about the aesthetics of the input," he says. Would the interaction be fun if there were no game? "Most sports pass that test," he says, noting that playing catch is fun even without rules.

One example is drumming your fingers on the keyboard - it's sort of inherently satisfying - and that became the inspiration for CLOP, which uses the H, J, K, and L keys.

"I'd like to have an anti-ergonomic game where it's physically challenging to play the game, and you could say to your friends 'I played for three hours, and I had to go to the hospital,'" he said.

Foddy has been researching pain, confusion, and nausea in games, to make games that give players those sorts of feelings.

Wolfenstein 3D makes people nauseous, but it doesn't make you feel good. "The reason I don't feel good about it is that it's not the point of the game," he says. "I think you could make a game where nausea is the point of the game, and people would enjoy it."

Motal Kombat gives you Fatalities, as an example of humiliation. "You might think that's for the pleasure of the winner, but I don't think that's right," he says. "The computer does it as well. I'm supposed to be enjoying it as a player, even on the losing end."

Ultimately it's all about playing with the player, as a developer. "The reason I'm cataloging these various dimensions of suffering, is why would frustration feel good? Why would confusion or humiliation be nice?" he posed. "I think one reason is it represents the developer playing with the player."

The idea among many developers is that confusion is an engineering failure. This means developer is teaching you how to stay interested in the game, rather than playing with you. "To me that's a warped way to look at the interaction between the developer and the player."

So in a single player game, the developer should be player 2. "Playing" is just an agreement that you won't kill each other - if you take it down to completely not hurting each other, it loses its teeth. "That's the flag football of video games," says Foddy. "I think you should make the real football of videogames."

If you do this, he says "you're playing with the player, rather than providing an environment for players to play with themselves."

Don't worry too much about frustration, and playtesting. "Maybe you shouldn't care so much about what people will think," he posed. "I wonder if Marcel Duchamp would've put a tutorial into his video games, if he made them? He wouldn't have focus tested his games."

"Don't water down your games. I think art should be difficult, I think it should be painful, it should be nauseating," he says. "It should be more difficult, more nauseating than music or other art because it's more complex," he concluded. "Don't make the easy listening of video games."

[Brandon Sheffield wrote this article, which originally appeared on Gamasutra.]

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Sony Computer Entertainment Worldwide Studios president (and indie game champion for Sony) Shuhei Yoshida, Giant Sparrow creative director Ian Dallas (The Unfinished Swan), thatgamecompany co-founder Kellee Santiago (Journey), and Adam Volker from small start-up Moonbot Studios (Diggs: Nightcrawler for Wonderbook) discussed the role of art in games at Gamescom 2012 last week.

Oh, there were some bigger devs there, too. However, anyone who's seen Tearaway should give a pass to Media Molecule co-founder Alex Evans (LittleBigPlanet). Same goes for Gavin Moore from Sony Japan Studio (Puppeteer), who actually argues games aren't "art" but a "craft."

[via Giant Sparrow]

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NG:DEV.TEAM's René Hellwig has launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund upgraded Steam, Xbox Live Arcade, and PlayStation Network ports for his R-Type-inspired Sega Dreamcast shoot-'em-up Redux: Dark Matters.

The campaign's main draw is a Kickstarter-exclusive Limited Edition preorder for the Sega Dreamcast version of Redux. Backers who pledge $65 or more will receive a two-disc set featuring Redux: Dark Matters and its predecessor DUX 1.5, both of which are playable on Dreamcast consoles. Only 1,000 copies of the set will ever be produced, and none will be sold after the Kickstarter campaign concludes.

As of this writing, the project has earned $8,000 toward its goal of $25,000, with 28 days left until the funding deadline. Pledge rewards range from downloadable soundtracks ($25) to custom-made arcade sticks ($1,000).

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The above two-month old trailer of Dark Computer Enterainment's Vektropolis made the rounds this month thanks to Pixel Prospector originally, charming gamers with its classy 80s arcade vector style. IndieGames caught up with developer Frank Travaini to find out the latest on his team's retro rescue game/first person shooter.

"[The above] video shows us playing around with just some of the features, but it's still very much a tech demo at that point. Andrew Crawshaw's been working on fine tuning the challenge of the game, and trying to tie together as much of our feature set as we can in a way that make sense but most of all is going to be fun. The video might make it look like an out and out shooter, but there's going to be a strategic element, too."

Lead Vektropolis developer Daniel Gallagher is no stranger to 80s vector graphics, seeing as he co-founded Vektor Grafix, which ported the 1983 Star Wars arcade game to several platforms.

Travaini shares that Gallagher's "been refining the surviving features; make the buildings look more elegant, improving the flight controls, and the not inconsiderable task of creating a brand new AI system so that the enemies can work their way around our cities like seasoned taxi drivers. A game like Vektropolis is full of technical hurdles to overcome, but we're ticking them off at a healthy rate."

As for the game's present look, Travaini notes, "Right now absolutely all of the artwork in the game is still being generated by Danny's code, but we're looking at modelling the enemies in 3D packages and bringing them into the game."

What's an 80s vector style game without a sci-fi story? Travaini reassures, "It's kind of crazy, but completely fits with what we're trying to achieve with the gameplay. People are going to think it's awesome, or they're going to be saying WTF?"

Travaini says the team is open to all platforms. "We had some good interest from publishers; however, we are really waiting for the demo to be out before making a decision about self-financing the game, Kickstarter or sell." This demo, Travaini urges, will only go out to select members of the press (and publishers) in the next month and will not have final graphics, art or a story line in place.

Travaini passed along these current WIP photos to IndieGames, so you could see it a little clearer than in the video:

Vektropolis_WiP_IndieGamesCom_03.jpg

Vektropolis_WiP_IndieGamesCom_04.jpg

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For more photos, check out the game's official Twitter collection.

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In the video above, 24 Caret Games' Matt Gilgenbach offers some insightful commentary over five minutes' worth of new gameplay footage from the upcoming rhythmic shoot-'em-up Retro/Grade.

In development for over three years, Retro/Grade won the Audience Choice Award at IndieCade 2010, and was recently featured at PAX East's Indie Megabooth.

Retro/Grade's reversed, low-scoring gameplay is optimized for Guitar Hero and Rock Band guitar peripherals, though standard controllers are also supported. The difficulty level gets pretty wild later on in the video -- try to keep up!

Retro/Grade is set to launch this summer as a downloadable title for the PlayStation 3.

[via @mommysbestgames]

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Developer Nigoro broke a months-long silence today, revealing that a PC version of its La-Mulana remake has entered testing, and that development is almost complete.

Nigoro also expresses uncertainty regarding the long-delayed WiiWare version of La-Mulana. Though it premiered as a downloadable Wii title in Japan almost a year ago, a localized version of La-Mulana has yet to appear in North America or Europe.

"The master data for NOA and NOE was handed to our publisher, Nicalis," Nigoro notes. "After that, we haven't received any reports. So, we have no idea when the release date is determined."

Nicalis previously published an upgraded WiiWare version of Cave Story after numerous delays, and recently announced that it will produce a Wii U remake for the XBLIG platformer Aban Hawkins & The 1000 Spikes.

Given that consumer demand for new Wii releases has cooled significantly since La-Mulana's initial announcement, Nicalis could be delaying the release to coincide with the Wii U's launch. Nicalis has not commented regarding its current publishing plans, however, nor has it issued a firm release date.

Nigoro itself plans to handle worldwide publishing duties for the PC version of La-Mulana, and assures that an overseas release is in the works.

[via @andore7, @VonRosceau]

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The BAFTA award-winning Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet is now open for pre-order on Steam for 25% off. Those who want to take advantage of the deal have before April 17, when the game becomes available. The spaceship-flying metroidvania title comes with all the DLC content that trickled out for XBLA.

Michel Gagne's blog shares some details about the upcoming PC release and existing XBLA title. Along with the PC release, the Xbox LIVE Arcade version will be discounted to 800 MS points. The Shadow Hunters Game Add-On will continue to be available for 400 MS points. This puts the complete experience at 1200 MS points, or $14.99, as it will be priced on Steam.

While waiting for your PC pre-order to be filled, check out this interview, where the developers talk about the differences between the movie and games industries.

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In addition to the above hands-on from Pixel Enemy of Adhesive Games's and Meteor Entertainment's Hawken, the following links look at PAX East 2012 indies Pocketwatch Games' Monaco, Hi-Rez Studio's SMITE and Tribes: Ascend, Phoenix Online Studios's Cognition, Ronimo Games's Awesomenauts, Warballon's Star Command, and Casual Brothers Games' Orc Attack.

Destructoid: Monaco: What's Yours is Mine needs to be mine - One of the more interesting classes, which I unfortunately didn't get to see in action, is The Redhead. According to Andy, she's able to distract one of the guards with her "come hither" good looks.

Joystiq: Star Command beams in this summer - The Warballoon team already told us they are switching to a far more context-sensitive interface system after observing players at PAX East. The game is also officially heading to iPad.

Destructoid coverage of independent company Hi-Rez Studio: upcoming MOBA with third-person perspective SMITE and jetpacking first-person shooter Tribes: Ascend.

Indie Game Magazine: Cognition Preview Oozing Surprises - Cognition is a point and click adventure title from Phoenix Online Studios, the team that has released 4 of the 5 free episodes to King's Quest: The Silver Lining.

Indie Game Magazine: Awesomenauts Preview - Awesomenauts is already an entertaining multiplayer experience and features a great variety of soldier classes with an cool toon-inspired art style.

TQcast: Orc Attack Gameplay - Off-screen gameplay.

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