Skip navigation
Help

Exhibitions

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
WSJ Staff

French graphic artist and photographer Romain Jacquet-Lagrèze captures Hong Kong's soaring heights.

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
WSJ Staff

William Eggleston's photographs, some of which are on display now at The Met Museum in New York, reminds us why he an American master. Though not a fan of digital photography, Mr. Eggleston agreed to shoot a digital photo for the upcoming June issue of WSJ. Magazine. Get a preview of that photo here.

0
Your rating: None

“Hong Kong Yesterday," an exhibition of Hong Kong photographer Ho Fan's work, is on display at the AO Vertical Art Space in Hong Kong through December 16. Take a look at some of the photos on display.

0
Your rating: None

Opening at the Half King in New York: Antonio Bolfo - IMPACT: Life on the Housing Beat

‘We were as green as could be, and like other Impact officers I hit the ground running with little to no knowledge of how to operate on the street.  Yet we were expected to  …  solve family disputes, console the parents of murdered children, and entertain the neighborhood drunk.’

- Antonio Bolfo

New York, NY — On July 24th, Antonio Bolfo’s photo exhibit of rookie police officers charged with patrolling a South Bronx housing project will open at The Half King. Bolfo undertook this photo project as an NYPD insider—for two years he worked in a police program called Operation Impact. With only six months of academic training, he and his confederates had to conduct manhunts, defend the helpless, and supply emotional succor to victims of violence.

On opening night, Antonio and Ed Conlon, former NYPD detective and author of Blue Blood, will moderate a slideshow and discussion of Antonio’s work.

The Half King - 505 West 23rd Street, NY, NY 10011    

0
Your rating: None

Photographer Stan Gaz's lastest work is presented in "Ensnared," a multimedia exhibition of sculptures, video and photographs at ClampArt Gallery. As the title suggests, "Ensnared" explores the roles of the hunter and the hunted...

0
Your rating: None

proportional_1000_1479_largeview.jpgFourth of July #2, Independence, Missouri, by Mike Sinclair

Photographers, mark your calendars! 2009 Ne Plus Ultra Mike Sinclair's debut solo show in NYC, at Jen Bekman Gallery, is but mere days away. An opening reception for Public Assembly will be held on Friday, May 11th, 2012, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., and the show will be on view Saturday, May 12th, through Saturday, June 24th.

Mike impressed our panelists with his ephemeral portraits focusing on "crowds at sun-soaked fairgrounds, beaches and baseball games," and he adeptly captured a sense of nostalgic Americana that we simply couldn't get out of our heads and hearts. Soon, he was creating limited-edition prints with 20x200 to share with collectors all around the world. We are thrilled for Mike's success, which includes being published in the New York Times, Metropolis, Architectural Record and Interior Design, as well as having his work in private and public collections in the U.S.

+ Photographer Daniel Seung Lee, who was a contender in a past round of our competition, was selected to participate with 20x200. Two of his photographs are now available as limited editions on the site.

+ April is almost over, and with it the Month of Photography Los Angeles (MOPLA). If you're in L.A., there are major ongoing exhibitions you can catch, like Robert Adams: The Place We Live and Fracture: Daido Moriyama at LACMA, as well as In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980, Herb Ritts: L.A. Style and Portraits of Renown: Photography and the Cult of Celebrity at The Getty.

+ Smaller shows were also taking place across town that featured Jen Bekman Projects artists. You can still catch Taj Forer's solo exhibition, Stone by Stone at LeadApron through May 19th.

0
Your rating: None

Photographer Jeffrey Milstein’s photographs of airplanes are currently being shown at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Mr. Milstein has been fascinated with the modern jet since childhood, earning his pilot’s license while he was a teenager. He loved hanging around the end of the runway at Los Angeles International Airport, feeling that he chould almost touch the planes as they went by. He still loves spending time on the runway, and often shoots the aircraft as they are flying directly overhead at close to 200 mph. Mr. Milstein: “I shoot mostly at LAX, as the planes are coming in for landing. I hand hold a Contax 645 camera body with a Phase One digital back… After capturing the image I mask and neutralize the sky so as to show only the aircraft in perfect symmetry. This isolates it like a portrait.” “AirCraft: The Jet as Art,” is on view through Nov. 25.


Lockheed Martin F-22A Raptor


Air Canada Boeing 767


Beech-18


EVA Boeing 747


Southwest Airlines Boeing 737

0
Your rating: None

Before he was executive director of the Herb Ritts Foundation, Mark McKenna was renowned photographer Herb Ritts’s camera assistant. In a recent interview Mr. McKenna tells about the making of the iconic image of the model Christy Turlington seen from the back, in a keyhole of white surrounded by the dramatic shadow of black fabric pulling upwards. He recalls that Ritts was “an incredible director of people…not just telling them what to do, but getting them to step in and be a part of the process.”

On this day, there was a sense of “play” in the air, despite the important client, Versace. Out in the Mojave desert, in full sun on the dry lake bed, El Mirage, with a small but able team, Ritts was in his element. As the model Christy Turlington held the fabric in front of her, the crew tied the outer corners to weighted stands on either side. All at once, the desert wind blew up the cone of fabric like an inside-out balloon, and Ritts had his moment. Minutes afterward, a storm rolled in and the crew rushed to clear out. The exhibition Herb Ritts: L.A. Style, opened April 3rd at The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, and is accompanied by a book of the same name from Getty Publications.


Versace Dress, Back View, El Mirage, 1990. © Herb Ritts Foundation


Christy Turlington, Versace 3, Milan, 1991. © Herb Ritts Foundation


Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Point Dume, 1987. © Herb Ritts Foundation


Male Nude with Socks I, Los Angeles (Mark Findlay), 1990. © Herb Ritts Foundation


Greg Louganis, Hollywood, 1985. Herb Ritts Foundation

0
Your rating: None

Four hundred miles above the Earth’s surface, for nearly 40 years, Landsat satellites have collected data for the U.S. Geological Survey, for use in scientific research. “Earth as Art 3,” an exhibit on display at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., offers an opportunity to celebrate the more dramatic images for their artistic value rather than their data value.

The latest satellite, Landsat 7, uses an instrument that collects seven images at once, with each image showing a specific part of the electromagnetic spectrum, called a band. Humans cannot see light outside the visible spectrum, but satellites are able to detect wavelengths into the ultraviolet and infrared. The original images are acquired in black and white, so color must be assigned via computer. The three primary colors of light are red, green and blue, and each color is given a different band/image. Once the three images are combined, you will have what is called a “false color image.” One common combination shows green, healthy vegetation as bright red, which is handy in forestry and agricultural applications. Landsat images are used to gather all kinds of geological and hydrological data and for other types of environmental monitoring.


The Erongo Massif, an isolated, sheer-walled mountain that rises 1,200 meters (3,937 feet) above arid Namibian plains. The massif is a remnant of a gigantic volcano that was active roughly 150 million years ago. At some point, the volcano’s center collapsed in upon itself under the weight of overlying lava. Eons of erosion by wind and wind-blown sand gradually exposed the long-dead volcano’s core of granite and basalt.


Oxbow lakes and cutoffs accompany the Mississippi river south of Memphis, Tennessee, on the border between Arkansas and Mississippi, USA.


Much of Oman is desert, but the Arabian Sea coast in the Dhofar region represents a marked difference. This coastal region catches the monsoon rains, or khareef, during the summer months. Drenching rains fall primarily on the mountainous ridge that separates the lush, fertile areas along the coast from the arid interior, feeding streams, waterfalls, and springs that provide water in the fertile lowlands for the remainder of the year.


Massive congregations of greenish phytoplankton swirl in the dark water around Gotland, a Swedish island in the Baltic Sea. Phytoplankton are microscopic marine plants that form the first link in nearly all ocean food chains.


After beginning in northern British Columbia and flowing through Yukon in Canada, the Yukon River crosses Alaska, USA, before emptying into the Bering Sea.

0
Your rating: None

Cindy Sherman’s work has fueled countless arguments: Are her images self-portraits or not? Is she a feminist or not? Is her work too repetitive? But on this point there is agreement–Cindy Sherman is one of the most influential contemporary artists. The current exhibition at MoMA contains 171 images from the mid-1970s to the present. It is an echo-chamber of sorts, a world without men where women look at women looking at women. In these powerful conceptual images where self-identity is provisional at best, Ms. Sherman comes across as courageous everywoman. She is a skilled actress and a extraordinarily clever detective of type and personality. Ms. Sherman works alone, without an assistant. In interviews, Ms. Sherman has said that she found working with models to be frustrating, because it was hard to direct someone in what is essentially an intuitive and private process. The exhibition runs until June 11.


Cindy Sherman. Untitled #465. 2008.


Cindy Sherman. Untitled #119. 1983


Cindy Sherman. Untitled Film Still #56. 1980


Cindy Sherman. Untitled #216. 1989


Cindy Sherman. Untitled #137. 1984.

0
Your rating: None