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Original author: 
Arik Hesseldahl

cloud1Here’s a name I haven’t heard in a while: Anso Labs.

This was the cloud computing startup that originated at NASA, where the original ideas for OpenStack, the open source cloud computing platform, was born. Anso Labs was acquired by Rackspace a little more than two years ago.

It was a small team. But now a lot of the people who ran Anso Labs are back with a new outfit, still devoted to cloud computing, and still devoted to OpenStack. It’s called Nebula. And it builds a turnkey computer that will turn an ordinary rack of servers into a cloud-ready system, running — you guessed it — OpenStack.

Based in Mountain View, Calif., Nebula claims to have an answer for any company that has ever wanted to build its own private cloud system and not rely on outside vendors like Amazon or Hewlett-Packard or Rackspace to run it for them.

It’s called the Nebula One. And the setup is pretty simple, said Nebula CEO and founder Chris Kemp said: Plug the servers into the Nebula One, then you “turn it on and it boots up cloud.” All of the provisioning and management that a service provider would normally charge you for has been created on a hardware device. There are no services to buy, no consultants to pay to set it up. “Turn on the power switch, and an hour later you have a petascale cloud running on your premise,” Kemp told me.

The Nebula One sits at the top of a rack of servers; on its back are 48 Ethernet ports. It runs an operating system called Cosmos that grabs all the memory and storage and CPU capacity from every server in the rack and makes them part of the cloud. It doesn’t matter who made them — Dell, Hewlett-Packard or IBM.

Kemp named two customers: Genentech and Xerox’s research lab, PARC. There are more customer names coming, he says, and it already boasts investments from Kleiner Perkins, Highland Capital and Comcast Ventures. Nebula is also the only startup company that is a platinum member of the OpenStack Foundation. Others include IBM, HP, Rackspace, RedHat and AT&T.

If OpenStack becomes as easy to deploy as Kemp says it can be, a lot of companies — those that can afford to have their own data centers, anyway — are going to have their own clouds. And that is sort of the point.

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Not everyone wants to run their applications on the public cloud. Their reasons can vary widely. Some companies don’t want the crown jewels of their intellectual property leaving the confines of their own premises. Some just like having things run on a server they can see and touch.

But there’s no denying the attraction of services like Amazon Web Services or Joyent or Rackspace, where you can spin up and configure a new virtual machine within minutes of figuring out that you need it. So, many companies seek to approximate the experience they would get from a public cloud provider on their own internal infrastructure.

It turns out that a start-up I had never heard of before this week is the most widely deployed platform for running these “private clouds,” and it’s not a bad business. Eucalyptus Systems essentially enables the same functionality on your own servers that you would expect from a cloud provider.

Eucalyptus said today that it has raised a $30 million Series C round of venture capital funding led by Institutional Venture Partners. Steve Harrick, general partner at IVP, will join the Eucalyptus board. Existing investors, including Benchmark Capital, BV Capital and New Enterprise Associates, are also in on the round. The funding brings Eucalyptus’ total capital raised to north of $50 million.

The company has an impressive roster of customers: Sony, Intercontinental Hotels, Raytheon, and the athletic-apparel group Puma. There are also several government customers, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, NASA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Defense.

In March, Eucalyptus signed a deal with Amazon to allow customers of both to migrate their workloads between the private and public environments. The point here is to give companies the flexibility they need to run their computing workloads in a mixed environment, or move them back and forth as needed. They could also operate them in tandem.

Key to this is a provision of the deal with Amazon that gives Eucalyptus access to Amazon’s APIs. What that means is that you can run processes on your own servers that are fully compatible with Amazon’s Simple Storage Service (S3), or its Elastic Compute cloud, known as EC2. “We’ve removed all the hurdles that might have been in the way of moving workloads,” Eucalyptus CEO Marten Mickos told me. The company has similar deals in place with Wipro Infotech in India and CETC32 in China.

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