Skip navigation
Help

iPhone

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
By THE NEW YORK TIMES

With more people reading the Times on smart phones, you can now experience Lens on the New York Times iPad/iPhone or Android app.

0
Your rating: None

[ See post to watch video ]

Say you want to quickly transfer a file, like a photo or a contact entry, from your smartphone to a friend’s. Most people would email or text the file. But a number of technologies have come along to make the process quicker and simpler.

On some Android phones, you can “beam” files like photos from phone to phone by tapping one phone to another, or bringing them very close. But that requires that both phones have a special chip, called NFC, which isn’t yet universal on Android phones and doesn’t exist at all in iPhones.

Another approach is to use an app called Bump, which transfers files between iPhones and Android phones when those holding them do a sort of sideways fist bump. It works pretty well, but you have to make contact with the other person.

image

With the Xsync iPhone app, you select an audio file, photo, video, contact or calendar appointment by tapping on the simple icon that represents each one.

This week, I’ve been testing a different approach — an iPhone app called Xsync. It doesn’t require any special chip and instead uses a free app and a hardware feature almost every smartphone possesses — the camera. While it is primarily meant, like Bump, for transfers between phones in proximity, it works over long distances. I was able to almost instantly send and get photos, videos and songs using Xsync between two iPhones held up to computer webcams during a Skype video call.

The key to Xsync is the QR code, that square symbol found seemingly everywhere these days—online, in print newspapers and magazines, on posters and other places. These codes typically just contain text—often, a Web address. But Xsync, a tiny company based in Seattle, generates QR codes that initiate the transfer of whole files, or in the case of photos, even groups of files. It has a built-in QR code scanner to read these codes using the phone’s camera.

The biggest drawback to Xsync is that it is currently only available for the iPhone. An Android version is planned for sometime this quarter. Meanwhile, you can use an Android phone with any QR code reader to receive, though not send, files sent via Xsync.

The Xsync app is something of a teaser for the underlying technology, which the company calls the Optical Message Service. The company’s goal isn’t to build its own apps, but to license the technology to cellphone makers so it becomes a built-in way to transfer files.

Here’s how it works. Once you install Xsync on your iPhone, you select an audio file, photo, video, contact or calendar appointment, each of which is represented by a simple icon. The app creates a QR code representing the intended transfer of that file and temporarily sends the file to Xsync’s server. Your friend uses Xsync to scan the QR code you’ve created with his or her iPhone’s camera, and the files are sent to your friend’s iPhone.

In my tests, it was easy, quick and reliable. I successfully used Xsync to send and receive all the included types of files with an iPhone 5, an iPhone 4S and an iPad mini. I was also able to receive files on an Android phone, a Google Nexus 4, via a QR code generated by Xsync.

image

The app generates QR codes that initiate the transfer of whole files, or in the case of photos, even groups of files.

You can even generate a QR code using Xsync that will allow you to transfer money from your PayPal account to another person’s, though that requires an added authentication step for security. But it worked, and would be a good way to, say, split a bill at a restaurant. (This PayPal feature of Xsync doesn’t work with Android, for now.)

The company says the file transfers are secure, for two reasons. First, they are encrypted. More important, each code is generated for a specific transfer and expires after a relatively short time. For instance, codes for photos expire after 24 hours, according to the company.

You can use Xsync to transmit certain kinds of files — including documents — you’ve stored in your Dropbox account, though, oddly, the Xsync app hides this document-transfer feature under an icon for sharing calendar appointments.

And you don’t have to be close to make the transfer. In addition to my Skype example, you can send a QR code generated by Xsync via email or text message, or even post the code to Facebook. Another person can then scan the code to get the file.

Xsync can generate codes that represent either existing files on your phone, or files you create on the spot. If you don’t want to use an existing one, the audio, photo, video and calendar icons in the app invite you to create a new file to be transferred.

On the iPhone, the receiving device displays the transferred files right within the Xsync app. If you’re using an Android phone to receive, you get a Web address that leads you to the file on Xsync’s server.

If you have an iPhone, Xsync is an effective way to transfer files like photos, songs, videos and more between phones.

Email Walt at mossberg@wsj.com.

0
Your rating: None

Green Dot today launches the smartphone-based GoBank, which will have no overdraft or penalty fees, no minimum balance and a “pay what you feel is right” monthly membership fee.

iphone_payLet’s take a step back to set this up. Lots of startup types go about their lives in search of something they can fix. “Banking!” they think. “Banking sucks! I hate all the fees and unfriendliness.”

But then they realize that banking is really hard. To do it right, you have to actually officially be a bank, which takes years, even if you can find an existing bank to buy. So startups like WePay and BankSimple (now Simple, if that tells you anything) have historically partnered with banks and offered user interfaces layered on top.

GoBank promises that it can fully bridge the two worlds. That’s because prepaid card provider Green Dot actually bought an FDIC-insured bank in Utah back in 2011, after two years of regulatory hurdles.

Then, in March, Green Dot bought Loopt, an early mobile location app maker that never had a ton of usage. But Loopt had a team of mobile developers and a strong leader in Sam Altman, one of the earliest participants in Y Combinator and a significant influence on the famous startup program as a part-time partner.

Altman said in an interview yesterday that he’s seen many a startup apply to YC over the years, trying to be a bank. But none of them were equipped to do it. “This is a product I’ve always wanted to build,” he said, “and it was just starting up when we were talking to Green Dot.”

Altman said it should take approximately four minutes to set up a GoBank account, and it can be done from a mobile phone. Starting today, GoBank plans to let 10,000 U.S. users in for a beta test, and expand from there.

GoBank charges for just four things: Putting a personal photo on your debit card ($9), going to an out-of-network ATM ($2.50), spending money in another country (3 percent), and paying your membership fee (whatever you want, a la Radiohead or Humble Bundle).

SamAltmanGoBankBut it promises that it has a huge network of fee-free ATMs — 40,000, more than twice as many as Chase and Bank of America.

The iPhone and Android apps also include budget tools (including a silly “fortune teller” feature that makes judgment calls on new purchases), an option to see your balance without logging in, bill payments and ways to send money to people outside the network through PayPal. Savings accounts and mobile alerts are also included.

The idea of allowing people to pay whatever they want for banking is an odd one. It might make sense in the context of thinking about the human appreciation you have for an artist like Radiohead, but this is a bank we’re talking about. Users can pay anywhere from $0 to $9 per month.

Altman said he likes the challenge. “We’re accountable to deliver a service that users think is worth something.”

0
Your rating: None

Aurich Lawson

Apple may be planning to add 2D fingerprint sensors to a future version of the iPhone, according to details revealed in a recent Securities & Exchange Commission filing. The PREM14A document (hat tip to TNW) was filed as a result of Apple's buyout of security chip firm AuthenTec, and it reveals more details about the agreement between the two companies, as well as hints about Apple's future engineering plans.

The SEC document reveals that Apple had been after biometric security company AuthenTec's unspecified "new technology" for almost a year ("late 2011") before it decided to go ahead and buy the company in July. At the time, AuthenTec had been approaching a number of consumer electronics companies—Apple included—to try to sell licenses for its unspecified technology. Apple was apparently the only company to try to move forward with an agreement—cost seemingly deterred others—but negotiations ended up falling apart in early 2012. That's when Apple began entertaining the idea of a buyout, offering AuthenTec $7 per share, for a total of $356 million.

According to the document, Apple tried to woo AuthenTec by arguing that its offer would allow the company to develop technology for just one platform instead of many.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

0
Your rating: None

Like many photojournalists, I’ve been shooting with my iPhone for a while. Using a mobile phone allows me to be somewhat invisible as a professional photographer; people see me as just another person in the crowd. Invisibility is particularly useful in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo, where a potpourri of armed groups and governments have used conflict minerals as the latest way to help fund the warfare, atrocities and repression that have afflicted the area for more than a century.

The electronics industry is one of the main destinations for these minerals, which include tourmaline, cassiterite and coltan. They are used to make critical components of mobile phones, laptops and other gadgets. So it is fitting—if ironic—that I shot this entire essay with my iPhone. I arrived in Congo in early August to document some of the mines in an attempt to highlight how the minerals travel out of the country—and the trade’s effect on the lives of the workers who handle them along the way. At a camp for internally displaced people in Kibati, the phone helped me shoot scenes unobtrusively. Taking photographs with a phone also raises my awareness as a photographer. Instead of concentrating on camera settings and a large piece of equipment, I am better able to focus on the situation before me. It becomes more about how I feel and what I see.

In Congo, the effects of the mineral trade on every person’s life—even the lives of people who aren’t working at the mines—are palpable. At a Heal Africa clinic in Goma, I met an emaciated teenage girl who had been gang-raped by three Hutu militiamen allegedly funded by profits from the mines. I’m not advocating giving up our gadgets. The causes of problems in Congo are far more complex. There are industry sponsored programs like Solutions for Hope, which tries to monitor coltan. But auditing the origins of these minerals is complicated by inaccessibility and danger. I’d like people to pause when they look at these photographs, taking time to think about where the material for modern technology comes from—and what lives are affected before they get into the phones in our hands.

Michael Christopher Brown is a photographer based in New York City. His photographs appear in this week’s issue of TIME. See more of his work here.

0
Your rating: None

AT&T's Toggle lets users switch between the work and personal parts of their smartphones.

AT&T

AT&T says it has the answer for corporations that want to let employees access work applications from personal phones without becoming a security threat. A new virtualization-style technology that works on both Android and iPhones creates a work container that is isolated from an employee's personal applications and data, letting IT shops manage just the portion of the phone related to work.

This isn't a new idea. ARM is talking about adding virtualization into the smartphone chip layer. VMware has been promising to virtualize smartphones for some time. What is notable about AT&T's technology is its flexibility. VMware's technology hasn't hit end users yet, largely because it must be pre-installed by phone manufacturers, limiting it to carriers and device makers that want to install it on their hardware.

AT&T's "Toggle" technology, meanwhile, works with any Android device from versions 2.2 to 3.x, as well as iPhones, and can be installed after a user buys it. Moreover, the technology is somewhat separate from AT&T's cellular division and can be used with any carrier.

Read more | Comments

0
Your rating: None

The good news: Apple’s newest Siri ads feature John Malkovich, who’s pretty cool.

The bad news, if you’re an Apple fan: Just like Apple’s other recent Siri ads, these don’t make Siri seem very cool.

In the first one, there’s at least the suggestion that Siri will help Malkovich find a restaurant where he can get some sausage. So that’s something, at least.

But the second one, where Malkovich is sitting around by himself, just killing time with his iPhone, without any discernible purpose?

That’s pretty realistic, actually. But it’s not fun to watch:

But, like I said, Malkovich really is cool. There are a gazillion furniture-chewing scenes I could pick to illustrate this, but for some reason I’ve always been partial to his preposterous Russian poker heavy, from “Rounders”:

0
Your rating: None

The teaser trailer for Warballoon Games’ Star Command has landed, giving us a glimpse into the fantastic pixel art of their upcoming spaceship-management game.

Star Command allows players to take control of a starship in humanities distant future. Players build their ship, staff and manage their crew, explore the galaxy, battle other species, discover far off worlds and attempt to control the universe.

The game is scheduled to launch this summer on iOS and Android devices, but the developers have plans for a future, “Ultimate” PC version as well, which would include “all the campaigns, all the expansions, [and] possible multiplayer.” I can not wait!

0
Your rating: None



An Ars story from earlier this month reported that iPhones expose the unique identifiers of recently accessed wireless routers, which generated no shortage of reader outrage. What possible justification does Apple have for building this leakage capability into its entire line of wireless products when smartphones, laptops, and tablets from competitors don't? And how is it that Google, Wigle.net, and others get away with publishing the MAC addresses of millions of wireless access devices and their precise geographic location?

Some readers wanted more technical detail about the exposure, which applies to three access points the devices have most recently connected to. Some went as far as to challenge the validity of security researcher Mark Wuergler's findings. "Until I see the code running or at least a youtube I don't believe this guy has the goods," one Ars commenter wrote.

According to penetration tester Robert Graham, the findings are legit.

Read the rest of this article...

Read the comments on this post

0
Your rating: None

Pure Data (Pd) is already a free, convenient tool for making synths, effects, and sequencers and other musical generators. But imagine stripping away all the things that tie it to a platform – UI, specific hardware support – so it will run just about anywhere, on anything, in any context.

That’s what libpd, a free, embeddable, open source (BSD) tool for making interactive music, does. Coders can take their favorite language and their favorite platform, and just plug in the power of Pd. They don’t even have to know almost anything about Pd – they can let an intrepid Pd patcher create the interactive sound effects and dynamic music for their game and just drop a patch into their assets.

One of the most powerful applications for this is the ability to add interactive music and sound to mobile apps, on iOS and Android, without writing and testing a bunch of custom DSP code. And that has enabled the use of libpd in apps as successful as Inception: The App. With music by Hans Zimmer and a custom “dream” experience created by RjDj, that app racked up millions of downloads in under a couple of months, and then, far from sitting idle on the app launch screen, went on to clock in over a century of user “dreamtime.”

Okay, so, you’re sold. You want to see what this thing can do, and maybe try it out, and you’re wondering where to start. So, here’s some good news: there’s a new site and a new book to get you going.

The site: libpd.cc

libpd has a new home on the Web, both in the form of a new GitHub repository to organize all the code and docs and samples, and a site that brings together a showcase of what the apps does and points you to where to learn more. The single destination is now hosted here by CDM:

http://libpd.cc

I built that site, so please, if there’s anything you’d like to see or you’ve got your own work created with libpd, let me know about it.

Even just having selected a few key highlights of apps built with libpd, it’s impressive what people are already doing with this tool:

libpd Showcase

The book, and a chat with its author

A new book published by O’Reilly focuses on building mobile apps using libpd, for iOS and Android. (iPhone, iPod touch, Android phones and tablets, and yes, even that “new iPad” introduced yesterday are therefore all fair game.)

You can read a section of the book right here on CDM, for a taste of what’s in store:
How to Make a Music App for iOS, Free, with libpd: Exclusive Book Excerpt

It’s an exceptional, comprehensive look at development using libpd, covering iOS and Android, but also a complete look at the libpd API and how to use it. For Pd patchers just getting started with iOS and Android, it includes all of the basics of how to use libpd in your mobile development environment. For mobile developers new to Pd and patching, it makes clear how you’d communicate with Pd, so you can either dive into Pd yourself or properly interface with patches made by musicians, composers, and sound designers with whom you may be collaborating. It’s an ideal title for anyone interested in taking a game and giving it a more dynamic soundtrack – in sound effects, music or both – or for people building mobile musical instruments and effects, sonic toys, interactive albums, or, really, anything at all that involves sound or music. Since it walks you through the entire development experience, you can sit down with it in the course of a few evenings, and get a complete picture of how to integrate Pd with your development workflow.

Dr. Peter Brinkmann, the principal developer of libpd, is the author of the title. I asked Peter to explain a little bit about the book, who it’s for (hint: you!), and what’s in it (hint: stuff you want to read!) …

CDM: How did this book come about? And the book process really helped drive improvements to libpd, too?

Peter B.: Shawn Wallace, an editor at O’Reilly, contacted me last summer and asked whether I would be interested in writing a short book on libpd. I was interested, and so I talked to my [Google] manager (“No conflict — we all have time-consuming hobbies!”) as well as a couple of colleagues who had written books for O’Reilly. They made a token attempt to dissuade me, but it was clear that they had enjoyed writing their books, and they seemed quite proud of the result, too.

Once I had made up my mind to write a book, the next question was whether to self-publish or go with O’Reilly. Self-publishing is a viable option these days, but then I decided that I really wanted an animal on the cover. Besides, I had never written a book before, and having the support of O’Reilly’s editorial staff made the prospect seem less daunting.

The first draft was done in mid-November, but at that time it was basically science fiction because it presented libpd the way I wanted it to be, not the way it was at the time.

So, after the bulk of the writing was done, libpd needed to be revised so that it would actually be in agreement with the book. In particular, Rich Eakin and I rewrote the iOS components for better performance and usability. That delayed the book by a month or so, which turned out to be a great stroke of luck because that was when I discovered that Xcode 4.2 had changed the entire development model by introducing automatic reference counting, instantly rendering existing
texts obsolete. That included my chapter on iOS, and so I had to sit down and rewrite it.

After that, the rest happened rather quickly — getting reviews, revising the draft, going through the production process. O’Reilly’s toolchain is remarkably efficient, using asciidoc and docbook in a Subversion repository. The editorial staff is great, too. I’m amazed to see how quickly it all came together.

How did you approach writing the book?

For the first draft, I just imagined that I was teaching a class on libpd. When you’re lecturing in front of an audience, you don’t have time to polish every sentence; you just have to talk and maintain some sense of momentum. That approach helps a lot when facing a blank page. After that, it’s many, many rounds of revisions to eliminate weak or redundant sentences.

For the sample code, I picked one project that uses all major components of libpd. That provided a natural progression from idea to completion, while touching on all important points in their proper context. I’m basically providing running commentary on my thought process when making an app, including common mistakes and pitfalls. Like this, readers will know how to recognize and work around most problems.

Another trick is to write more than necessary. The first draft contained a lot of gratuitous editorializing. Those parts were never meant to make it into the finished text, but they were fun to write and they kept me going when I wasn’t quite sure what to write next.

Who it’s for?

The book explains how to patch for libpd, and how to write apps with libpd, with special emphasis on the interface between Pd patches and application code. It’s for mobile developers who want to add real-time audio synthesis to their projects, as well as sound designers who want to deploy their work on mobile devices. It’s light on prerequisites; if you know how to write a basic app for Android or iOS, you’re ready to read the book.

Ed.: I’d add to that, given that there are such great tutorials on app development for Android and iOS – even many of them free, including some very worthwhile documentation from Google and Apple — if you’ve messed with Pd, you should give the book a try. And if you haven’t messed with Pd, this could be a great excuse. This book won’t teach you Pd, but it’ll make very clear how to glue everything together. -PK

Why does a book like this matter? What do you hope will come out of it?

I hope that the book will help popularize real-time procedural audio, in games and other apps. I’m thrilled to see all the projects that use libpd, and I hope that the book will help people create even more awesomeness of this kind. One thing I only fully realized when writing the book is that libpd lets developers use DSP code like a media file: An audio developer creates a Pd patch, and the app developer just drops it into the resources of the app and loads and
triggers it as needed. I guess this was implicit in a blog post I wrote on workflow and prototyping a year ago, but I think the DSP-as-media angle is even more powerful. I hope that the book will bring this out.

The book project has already improved libpd. Whenever I faced the choice between fixing an awkward bit of code or explaining the awkwardness in the book, I chose to fix the code. That took care of all the little things that were sort of bothering me but didn’t seem significant enough to spend time on. It also gave us a deadline for a number of related things that we wanted to do, such as migrating to GitHub and launching the new website, libpd.cc. Ed.: Cough. Yes, glad that gave me that deadline – and thanks to Peter B. for the extra push! -PK

Congrats to Peter on his first animal-on-a-cover! It’s really a great book: you read it, and feel like making more new things, inventing new creations that produce sound and music. And that’s a very good thing.

Tweet

0
Your rating: None