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Original author: 
yonghow

Miyazaki Hayao’s latest animated film Kaze Tachinu (The Wind Rises) will start its domestic run in Japan from the 20th of July and publicity for the film has been in full swing for a while. I’ve collected a few clips in this post for your enjoyment, beginning with the trailer right below :

(above) Next up is a clip from the sound recording studio with Hideaki Anno (yes, the director of Evangelion) up as the voice of the lead character Jiro Horikoshi. Voice recording sessions are called “Ah-fu-re-ko” in Japan.

Part of the conversation between Anno-san and Miyazaki-san :

Anno-san : “I’ll do my best. (for the voice recordings) I can’t promise anything more !”

Miyazaki-san : “That’s fine. Suzuki-san (famous Ghibli producer) will take over you if can’t manage.” (Suzuki-san laughs in the background)

In their conversation, Miyazaki-san addresses Hideaki Anno as just “Anno”, without the honorific “-san”. If there’s anyone with the authority to do that, it’d be Miyazaki-san. :P

(above) In this next clip, Ghibli producer Suzuki-san makes an appearance on a Japanese variety program to promote the film and gives some background information regarding the story & characters.

The hiragana characters splashed acrossed the poster is handwritten by Suzuki-san, and is the tagline for the film “Ikineba” (loosely translating as “live on”).

The lead character Jiro Horikoshi is actually a combination of 2 historical characters that Miyazaki-san highly respect – the novelist Hiro Tatsuo & and the chief engineering of the WWII Japanese “Zero” fighter plane.

Suzuki-san also goes on the explain that all the sound effects (engines of the plane, etc) in the film are synthesized by voice actors. This is actually not new to Ghibli films as it has been done before on the Ghibli Museum short “House Searching”.

(above) Suzuki-san talks to actress Miori Takimoto, who voices the female lead Naoko Satomi, and also some behind the scenes in the voice recording studio. Apparently Miori-san was recommended for the role by Miyazaki-san’s mentor Takahata-san.

The storyboard book (drawn by Miyazaki-san) for Kaze Tachinu is now up for pre-orders on Amazon Japan, going on sale later in July. I believe the last storyboard book that Miyazaki-san drew was for Ponyo, and that was just spectacular.

I hope to get a copy of Kaze Tachinu soon to do a review.

Kaze Tachinu will take a while to reach screens outside of Japan, but I’m sure it’ll be worth it.

Sidenote : Otomo Katsuhiro’s animated film Short Peace is also starting it’s run on 20th of July. While the target audience/demographic is not exactly the same, its definitely going to face stiff competition from a Ghibli film.

Related Posts:



  1. Kaze Tachinu – Hayao Miyazaki’s New Film


  2. Studio Ghibli Layout Exhibition – A preview


  3. The Art Of Porco Rosso Book Review


  4. Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea


  5. Studio Ghibli – Brutus Magazine Special Part I
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Original author: 
boesing

sutrs

“The first joint of a little finger can be sliced easily,” he said. “You tie the bottom of it with thread tightly and put your body weight on a kitchen knife. But the second joint was tougher than I thought.” Luckily, there was a brother to hand, who could stand on the knife and slice through the knuckle. The loss of the tip of the pinkie on his right hand was his own fault — he got drunk and started throwing furniture around in a bar. Unfortunately for him, the bar belonged to a friend of his boss. Out came the kitchen knife again, and off came the top of his little finger. But his fourth amputation bore a whole different significance.

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/06/13/fake-fingers-help-ex-yakuza-lead-l...

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Original author: 
Jeff

yu yamauchi mt fuji photography
Every morning at dawn for 600 days, Yu Yamauchi took a picture from the same location, living in a hut near the summit of Mt. Fuji. See more from this amazing series below!

View the whole post: 600 sunrises atop Mt. Fuji by Yu Yamauchi over on BOOOOOOOM!.

    

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Original author: 
Toru Hanai

Located beachside I immediately thought of basing the main photo for this trip on this famous “ukiyoe” print by the artist Hokusai.

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Original author: 
Marco Bohr

As the old expression “a canary in a coal mine” suggests, the small songbirds have long been a symbol of a type of early-detection system — a way of indicating something that might otherwise remain unknown. And just as the old coal mine canaries alerted miners to invisible gases and fumes, the camera is capable of capturing moments that might pass unrevealed, or undiscovered. The striking pictures in Japanese artist Lieko Shiga’s series, Canary — currently on display at the Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam FOAM — references this powerful metaphor with images that are not immediately recognizable, nor easily understood, but that are nevertheless laden with meaning.

The Amsterdam show is comprised of an extensive body of work first published as a book in 2007 — a book that has since become something of a classic among photobook collectors. The majority of images in Canary are utterly fantastical, bordering on the surreal: a giant animal skull in a room lit by mysterious blue light; a fireball writhing in midair; a woman floating above the half-naked body of a man lying in bed. Elaborate and visually arresting dreamscapes, the pictures’ effectiveness is largely achieved through an intriguing interplay between light and color. However, much of the work is also manipulated: relying on analog technologies, some negatives appear scratched while other effects appear to have been produced in the darkroom. The extent of this manipulation varies. As Shiga points out: “I always try to approach the subject in its own way.” The photographer’s methods, in other words, are dictated by the subject of the image, and not the other way around.

Perhaps because most of the images in the Canary series were produced at night or in dark, interior spaces, the work at-once possesses and exudes an unsettling, ambiguous aura. The viewer’s sense of stumbling upon another’s intensely personal dreamscape is heightened even further in the photos where the identity of the subject is disguised.

In “Restaurant Surtaj,” for instance, the details of a restaurant interior recede before the eerie presence of a woman whose face is obscured by a ghostly black presence. The photograph has the palpable sense of a half-remembered dream. The dreamer struggles to give shape to a dream — perhaps even recalling the table number in a restaurant — but can not bring into focus the face of her dinner companion.

Shiga’s work is strongly reminiscent of the black and white photography of Masatoshi Naito. In his classic project, Tono-Monogatari, from 1983, Naito interrogates the complex relationship between mysticism, spirituality and Japanese folklore in a striking series of nocturnal landscapes and portraits. By manipulating the photographic negative or print, however, Shiga also points to the inherent vulnerability of the human body. If not suspended, as it were, in Shiga’s imagination, many of her subjects would fall, collapse or drown, simply as a consequence of the laws of physics.

The emphasis on the body perhaps relates to Shiga’s past experience as a dancer, which she practiced before teaching herself photography. Rather than depicting or documenting a recognizable physical world, however, Shiga instead employs photography as a means of choreographing an emotionally and psychologically complex inner landscape.

Lieko Shiga is a Japanese fine-art photographer.

Marco Bohr is a photographer and writer based in London. He maintains the Visual Culture blog.

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Original author: 
WIRED UK

Erich Ferdinand

Authorities in Japan are so worried about their inability to tackle cybercrime that they are asking the country's ISPs to block the use of Tor.

According to The Mainichi, the National Police Agency (NPA, a bit like the Japanese FBI) is going to urge ISPs to block customers if they are found to have "abused" Tor online. Since Tor anonymizes traffic, that can be read as a presumption of guilt on anyone who anonymizes their Web activity.

The Japanese police have had a torrid time of late when it comes to cybercrime. Late last year a hacker by the name of Demon Killer began posting death threats on public message boards after remotely taking control of computers across the country. The police arrested the four people whose IP addresses had been used and reportedly "extracted" a confession, but they were forced into a humiliating apology when the hacker kept posting messages while the suspects were in custody.

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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