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Original author: 
Marius Troy

Ben Trovato is back, and so is Los Angeles based fashion photographer Aaron Feaver. Having already shot four stories for Ben Trovato, Feaver should be no stranger to the regular BT reader. His latest contribution, Silence, features Alex Wurfel styled by Tiff Horn, shot with a Pentax 67, Canon A2e and Vivitar Ultra Wide & Slim, all with Kodak Tri-X film.

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Original author: 
Marius Troy

About six years ago Adam Rindy decided to pursue his passion for fashion photography, and moved to Los Angeles. The move was vital for his career, and he's been shooting ever since, and even landing a feature on Ben Trovato a couple of years ago with his story Road To Solvang. Today he's finally back with another story for us, The Last Days of Summer, featuring the stunning Hanna Doerksen.

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"Marga and Mike is such a crazy duo!" photographer Emman Montalvan tells us. Inspired by their friendship and unstoppable attitude the LA based artists brought the two models up on the roof top of his building to hang out and shoot until they ran out of polaroid film and battery. "It was perfect because they are best friends. I wanted the shoot to be really laid back with no fuss," he continues, before explaining that it was a true please to work with both of them.

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Critics can’t seem to decide whether Alex Prager’s photography evokes the 1940s, 50s, 60s, 70s or even 80s. The truth is Prager’s film and photography draws on cinematic and visual cues from every decade. While William Eggleston, Alfred Hitchcock, David Lynch and Guy Bourdin have all been said to colour her work, Prager melds the palette of Hollywood’s golden yesteryears to her own ends. Prager-land has become a dark fantasy world where timeless themes subvert and sidestep period and categorisation.

See her new exhibition ‘Compulsion’ at Yancey Richardson in Los Angeles from April 5th, M+B in New York from April 7th or Michael Hoppen Contemporary in London from April 20th. fourthandmain.com/journal

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The long and legendary supermodel era of the ’90s can be summed up in one gorgeous and distinct photograph: Herb Ritts’ now-iconic shot of Naomi Campbell, Cindy Crawford, Christy Turlington, Tatjana Patitz and Stephanie Seymour huddled together in the nude.

But the 1989 sitting almost didn’t happen.

As Campbell recalls, Turlington was on a Calvin Klein contract and reportedly wasn’t allowed to participate. “We said, ‘How can you not be in this picture?’” Campbell says. “And she jumped in, and that was it!”

That black-and-white image is just one of nearly 80 photographs on display at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles as part of a new exhibition and book on the photographer. Herb Ritts: L.A. Style, on view through Aug. 12, focuses on the portraits and nudes from Ritts, who documented models, musicians, actresses and other celebrities for magazines such as Interview, Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair throughout his career.

“He always had a vision about how he wanted every picture,” Campbell says. “He liked strength in his pictures, and he got you to do things that you never thought you could do. He was very encouraging and would talk to you about a picture first, and slowly get you there to where he wanted. And you’d be amazed that you even could do that. It was always a pleasure working with him. He was a complete gentleman, and I loved every picture he took of me.”

Herb Ritts—© Herb Ritts Foundation

Herb Ritts: L.A. Style is on view through Aug. 12 at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles.

Campbell first met Ritts in the late ’80s when she was introduced by fellow model Tatitz. She would often stay with him when she visited Los Angeles, and the two later traveled together to South Africa, where Ritts captured the first photograph of the supermodel with former South African president Nelson Mandela. “He was just a really special human being, and someone that I know is dearly missed in fashion—you never see that kind of picture anymore,” Campbell says.

And while many people revere the image of the five supermodels as one of the most famous sittings in fashion photography, Campbell says they had no idea it would become so iconic. “It was just nice for us to be together,” she says. “We rarely get to do pictures together—even to this day—so it was like a catch-up time for us. We got there in the morning, had lunch and then he told us what we were going to do. It was easy—it was always easy with Herb.”

Herb Ritts: L.A. Style is on view through Aug. 12 at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles and the book by Paul Martineau is available here.

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Youth culture, through revolt, unabashedly asks us to question and confront our historical and cultural traditions. In post-war Japan, the explosion of the taiyozoku or sun tribe—a term for the youth sub-culture that emerged in the 1950s—was seen by the older, conservative generations as crude and violent. Flooded with new imagery from the West, there was a break in the connection to the past and thus a rejection of traditional values. Affected by the nouvelle vague Western youth and media, the taiyozoku were pictured as promiscuous and nihilistic, throwing their cares to the wind.

Arriving in Tokyo in 1961, Daido Moriyama began photographing the seedy streets of Shinjuku, a ward ravaged during the war. Although the Shinjuku of today is best known as the economic and commercial center of Tokyo, it still retains a revolutionary spirit that started in its post-war bars and red-light district. Moriyama’s high-contrast, gritty depictions capture the energy native to the neighborhood, creating a visual history of Tokyo’s youth throughout one of its most combustible phases in history. It is this power that shapes Moriyama’s work, creating an unfolding visual testament to the cultural landscape of post-war Japan.

A new exhibition pays tribute to Moriyama’s four decade relationship with Shinjuku, which serves as a photographic act of memory and desire. In Fracture: Daido Moriyama, opening at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on April 7, these notions are explored through a selection of prints and books, as well as recent color work. Moriyama began his career in Tokyo assisting the photographer Eikoh Hosoe. Hosoe was a member of the influential artist collective VIVO, which served to capture the significant cultural and structural changes within Japanese society. In line with this method of working, Moriyama began to roam the streets of Shinjuku and, since the early 1960s, has been witness to the ever-changing and expanding post-WWII landscape—a fractured, strange world that oscillates between time and space, reality and fiction.

Fracture: Daido Moriyama is on view at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art from April 7 through July 31.

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