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The day after the London Olympics closing ceremony, the stadium was empty, save for clean-up crews. During the height of the games, 80,000 spectators watched track and field events. See a side-by-side comparison of those two occasions.

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One of the better images from the transit of Venus to emerge this week comes from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. It shows a detailed view of the face of the Sun with Venus approaching on June 5th, 2012.

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Grey Villet, a photographer for LIFE magazine, took fly-on-the-wall images of Mildred and Richard Loving, the interracial couple behind a milestone Supreme Court case. His photos of the Lovings are now on display at the International Center of Photography in New York and play a key role a new HBO documentary, ‘The Loving Story.’ Recently, photojournalist Daniella Zalcman visited his widow Barbara Villet at her home in upstate New York while on assignment for The Wall Street Journal. Below, hear Barbara discuss his work and see more of his photos.

To read reporter Lana Bortolot’s story about Grey Villet and his work, click here.

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The Nikon Small World contest, which selects some of the best examples of photomicrography annually has added a new category to include movies made under the microscope. This year’s winner is a stunner of a video by Anna Franz in the School of Pathology at the University of Oxford. Ms. Franz cut a window into an egg to expose the 72-hour-old chick embryo and carefully injected ink using a glass capillary needle into its artery under a stereo microscope. Here is an edited transcript of an interview with Ms. Franz:

“I am currently doing a Ph.D. in developmental biology studying centriole duplication [cell behavior] in Drosophila [fruit flies]. In 2010 I took a six-week course in embryology at Woods Hole [Marine Biological Laboratory] where I learned several techniques used to study embryogenesis in a number of organisms. One of these techniques was the injection of ink into an artery with the aim to visualize the vasculature of the chick embryo. This image/movie gives the viewer the opportunity to observe a biological process as it is happening and gives an overview of how the blood system works. The films also demonstrates beauty in simplicity; what could be more simple than an egg?

The reason why researchers study the vasculature of chick embryos is because it is very similar to the human vasculature. A better understanding of the development and function of the heart and the vasculature may help spur the discovery of novel therapeutics, which can be used to treat cancer (since tumor growth relies on blood vessel growth) and cardiovascular diseases.”

Courtesy Anna Franz, University of Oxford/Nikon Small World

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Saxophonist Benny Golson played his composition “Whisper Not” in his neighborhood, Manhattan’s Upper West Side, on a warm day earlier this month.

Wall Street Journal reporter Marc Myers speaks with Jazz legend Benny Golson prior to his series of shows at New York’s Jazz Standard.

All photographs by Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal.

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In 2003, Ian Welch was on his first combat tour in Iraq. As his battalion waited to storm the Diyala Bridge and seize Baghdad, an artillery shell struck the vehicle behind him, killing two soldiers and knocking Mr. Welch unconscious. When he came to, he was disoriented. His vision was blurred. Blood dripped from his ears. He helped gather the remains of the dead before heading out to take the bridge. He returned to Iraq twice more on combat tours.

Mr. Welch was later diagnosed with chronic PTSD and traumatic brain injury. He now lives in Dallas, Texas, with his girlfriend and government-paid caregiver, Katie Brickman. Every day, he faces the long-term effects of PTSD: bouts of amnesia, insomnia, anxiety, dizziness and vomiting.

Photographer Brandon Thibodeaux spent two months chronicling Mr. Welch’s struggles and with Wall Street Journal photo editors Matthew Craig (Executive Producer) and Kate Lord (Associate Producer), created the video below. This is Mr. Thibodeaux’s account. To read the story and see the complete interactive, click here.

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I’ve come to think of Ian’s way of dealing with PTSD as a protective moat–a barrier he crosses only for doctor’s appointments, haircuts and other necessary outings.

When I was first assigned the story, I was planning on still photographs. But in the end we decided that the complexity of the story required much more, and I needed a different approach. I quickly learned that I needed ample time, as well as video and audio equipment to best tell Ian’s story.

Ian is someone who rarely steps outside of his structured life, so it was essential to gain his trust. In the end, Katie, his girlfriend, was key. She acts as his protector, making sure to blunt potential triggers to his PTSD. Katie studied photography and knew of the work of Tim Hetherington and other war photographers. She convinced Ian The Wall Street Journal project could be therapeutic.

Before I was assigned the story, I knew of PTSD as a combat disorder. After spending days with Ian and Katie, I learned of its long and tenacious grip on everyday life.

I felt it only fair to reveal my own vulnerabilities since Ian exposed so many of his. As a teenager, I underwent chemotherapy for a rare case of lymphoma cancer. While I didn’t face enemy fire or lose friends in a battle, it gave us a patch of common ground. I faced attacks from my own body. And when he described his anxiety and mood swings, it stoked memories of friends I had met at the hospital. I often wondered why I was allowed to survive and they were not. Even Katie’s role with Ian was reminiscent of how my parents must have managed, juggling appointments and providing support.

Once he allowed me access to his home, Ian, Katie, and I spent a lot of time together. It was important to become a part of his routine. Many days were quiet with little to photograph. Since Ian and Katie stayed up late, it made sense for me to stay overnight sometimes.

To understand his deeper, more personal thoughts, I asked Ian to read his journals, and to describe what he recalled from the injury on April 7, 2003. I felt horrible asking to hear such difficult memories. One night, as we finally felt comfortable enough to go over his combat experience, I had to help him walk back into the house. Katie didn’t know how to react when she saw how weak he was. It was a powerful reminder of how difficult it was for him to revisit the most painful parts of his past.

When the project was over, Ian was inundated by phone calls from loved ones. Katie couldn’t thank us enough for spending so much time with Ian and for capturing such an honest portrayal. Ian also talked about the project a lot and was more open to discussing his PTSD. I hope his story and video helps him hear those inner thoughts with better perspective. And I hope his story reaches and comforts others like him.

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