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Mustafah Abdulaziz

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From muddy fishing in India to wading through an animal fat spill in Houston, Texas, take a look back at a few of The Wall Street Journal’s most memorable images of 2011. (See the complete version of Photos of the Year 2011).

Photo by David Degner for The Wall Street Journal.

A woman standing in the moonroof of a car held up a flag as people gathered in Alexandria, Egypt, Feb. 11 to celebrate the announcement that President Hosni Mubarak would step down. More: In a Flash, Alexandria Erupts in Mass Jubilee.

Photo by Sanjit Das/Panos for The Wall Street Journal.

Children and adults who belong to the Chowduli community looked for small fish in the muddy remains of a pond in Kuliadanga village in India on Dec. 1. More: For India’s Lowest Castes, Path Forward is ‘Backward’.

Photo by Jesse Neider for The Wall Street Journal.

Tom Chase, left, helped his uncle, Richard Filipelli, break down the remains of his house on Cozy Avenue in East Haven, Conn., on Aug. 29 after Tropical Storm Irene swept through. More: Northern Landfall Puts Storm on Map

Photo by Joel van Houdt for The Wall Street Journal.

Women and children lay in the street minutes after a bomb went off near crowds of worshippers in Kabul, Afghanistan, Dec. 6, killing dozens. More: Attacks Point to New Afghan Conflict.

Photo by Mustafah Abdulaziz for The Wall Street Journal.

Sherry Vargson, of Granville Summit, Pa., can light a match at her kitchen tap and see an orange flame flare out of the faucet. State regulators attribute the methane contamination to natural-gas drilling. More: Drillers Face Methane Concern.

Photo by Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal.

Trin Bostick, right, and Jen Cinclair waited to be married outside the city clerk’s chapel in the Queens borough of New York on July 24, the first day same-sex marriage became legal in the state. More: For Same-Sex City Couples, Day 1 of ‘I Do’.

Photo by Michael Stravato for The Wall Street Journal.

A worker waded through animal fat on Jan. 5 after 15,000 gallons of it spilled from a Jacobs Stern & Sons storage tank along the Houston Ship Channel. The fat made its way through the storm drains to the channel. More: Houston Ship Channel Closed After Animal-Fat Spill.

Photo by Keith Bedford for The Wall Street Journal.

Cotton farmer Yu Feng sat Jan. 28 with cotton he was storing in his home in the town of Huji in the Chinese province of Shandong. Despite record cotton prices in 2010, some farmers were storing their harvests, hoping further rises could cover the high cost of fertilizer and labor. More: Chinese Take a Cotton to Hoarding.

Photo by Gilles Sabrie for The Wall Street Journal.

Shoe-factory workers enjoyed a break at a fair in Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, China, Nov. 1. Slowing exports amid world economic woes hit the city — the birthplace of China’s private sector — hard. More: Wenzhou’s ‘Annus Horribilis’ Shakes China.

Photo by Blake Gordon for The Wall Street Journal.

Victor Maceyra, a quadriplegic, said a Medicare-Medicaid disagreement meant an extra six months living in a rehab center after he finished therapy for a shoulder injured in an accident with his wheelchair. More: Overlapping Health Plans Are Double Trouble for Taxpayers.

Photo by Bryan Denton for The Wall Street Journal.

From left, Sgt. James Hamelin, 24; Sgt. Trentin Wilson, 24; and Lance Cpl. Seth Voie, 23, rested and talked Feb. 9 at Patrol Base Hernandez in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, after returning from a patrol. More: Rx for Combat Stress: Comradeship.

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New Yorkers remember the victims of Sept. 11, plus a community mourns a high school basketball star and Union Square gets a new sculpture. A look at the week’s best images from around Greater New York.


Police officers from the United Kingdom marched in formation across the Brooklyn Bridge on Sunday, Sept. 11. The group walked from downtown Brooklyn for the memorial ceremony at Ground Zero. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)


Children and young adults took part in a citizenship ceremony at Citi Field before the Mets game on Wednesday. (Mustafah Abdulaziz for The Wall Street Journal)


A 37-year-old Verizon worker was electrocuted Wednesday morning in Brooklyn as he worked on lines connected to a utility pole, officials said. Here, the scene at the corner of Christopher Avenue and New Lots Avenue. (Andrew Hinderaker for The Wall Street Journal)


A woman lit a candle at a memorial at the entrance to the Grant Houses complex in Manhattan on Monday, following the murder of 18-year-old high school basketball standout Tayshana Murphy. Ms. Murphy was shot in the hallway of the public-housing project on Sunday. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)


A selection of whiskeys are on display at Whiskey Park, at 100 Central Park South in New York, N.Y. (Ramsay de Give for The Wall Street Journal)


One hundred dancers gathered around the Revson Fountain at Lincoln Center on Sunday morning to perform ‘The Table of Silence Project,’ a public tribute to the events of 9/11. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)


David Shih and Christine Toy Johnson rehearsed a scene from ‘Crane Story’ at the Cherry Lane Theatre. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)


Grilled Octopus, organic lentils and potatoes at Bocca East, 1496 Second Ave. at 78th Street. (Nick Brandreth for The Wall Street Journal)


The members of Squad One in Brooklyn’s Park Slope assembled to observe a moment of silence at 9:45am Sunday. The company lost 12 firefighters ten years ago at the World Trade Center. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)


A demonstration kiosk was set up on Wednesday in a pedestrian plaza south of Madison Square Park for a news conference announcing a bicycle-sharing program New York City plans to launch next year. (Mustafah Abdulaziz for The Wall Street Journal)


A 26-foot tall bronze sculpture, ‘Elefrandret,’ by artist Miquel Barceló was installed in Union Square in Manhattan. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)


Members of the press stood in the newly opened Memorial Plaza at Ground Zero during the opening of the National September 11 Memorial on Monday. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)


Leigh Keno, the host of the popular television show, ‘Antiques Roadshow,’ inspected a chair of Wall Street Journal columnist Ralph Gardner at his home on the Upper East Side. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)


Lifeguard Randy Dodd, center, carried a memorial wreath out to sea during a memorial service at Long Beach, Long Island, Sunday. Mr. Dodd and about 300 other surfers held a ceremony in the water, forming a circle and joining hands. Each surfer wore an armband with the name of a Sept. 11 first responder from Long Island. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)


Inside of the offices and manufacturing floor of the Lee Spring company, a tenant in the Brooklyn Army Terminal in Sunset Park (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


Third-grade teacher Tavares Bussey read out loud to his students during the first day of the school year at Brennan-Rogers, a K-8 public school in New Haven, Conn., on Sept. 1. (Jesse Neider for The Wall Street Journal)


Maggie Jewell, 6, created a makeshift memorial to her second cousin, Joseph G. Hunter, a firefighter who died at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2011, during a memorial service on the tenth anniversary of attacks at Lido Beach on Long Island on Sunday. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)

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Despite preparations by residents and tourists, Irene weakened from hurricane status to that of a tropical storm by the time it hit the New York region.

Michael and Lancs Walsh board up a friend’s house in Queens as Hurricane Irene made its way to New York, Saturday, Aug. 27. Some decided to pack up and head to safer and higher ground and others to wait it out. Residents of the lower-lying beach community were on evacuation orders as of 5pm Saturday evening. (Julie Platner for the Wall Street Journal)

Stephanie Munoz, 23, and her mother Celeste Miles walk along the beach to see the stormy ocean one last time before going back inside to wait out the impending hurricane in Queens, Aug. 27. (Julie Platner for the Wall Street Journal)

Jonathan Fey paddles his way down Nassau Ave in Freeport, N.Y., after Tropical Storm Irene flooded the neighborhood, Sunday, Aug. 28. (Joel Cairo for The Wall Street Journal)

Residents of Freeport make their way through the street Sunday. (Joel Cairo for the Wall Street Journal)

Pat Sterner stands in a few inches of water in her home after her Freeport neighborhood was flooded. (Joel Cairo for the Wall Street Journal)

A fallen tree blocks Bedford Avenue near North 12th Street in Brooklyn on the morning Tropical Storm Irene hit the city. (Mustafah Abdulaziz for The Wall Street Journal)

Flood waters overtake a gas station on 23rd Street and FDR Drive, Sunday, Aug. 28 in Manhattan. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)

Darren Renatta and his mother, Beth, investigate East River flood waters Sunday. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)

Peter Falsetta, 58, and Thomas Kim, 46, overlook the Upper Bay from near the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, Sunday morning, as the eye of Tropical Storm Irene was thought to passing over Coney Island. Kim has lived in Bay Ridge for 20 years, and Falsetta has spent his life here. Neither could recall seeing the water level so high. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)

Glenn Sanchez of Tampa, Florida, plays softball in Times Square Sunday after the brunt of the storm had passed. Sanchez is a member of Elite Fire Softball, a team competing at the World Police and Fire Games 2011. The team’s Sunday game was postponed due to the storm. (Kate Lord/The Wall Street Journal)

Civilians take photos and videos of the New York Army National Guard 206th Military Police Company, based out of Latham, New York, as they leave New York City Aug. 28. The 206th arrived on the afternoon of Aug. 27 to help with Hurricane Irene damage, however the storm caused less damage than originally anticipated. The company was being moved to Farmingdale, New York, where they were going to regroup and receive new orders. (Andrew Burton for The Wall Street Journal)

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Girls cool off in a pool in the Bronx, fans watch the Women’s World Cup final on a screen in Times Square, a microlibrary lends books in Brooklyn and more in this week’s best photos from across Greater New York.


Sisters Ivelise, left, and Jadalyn Acosta jumped into the ‘Floating Pool Lady,’ a seven-lane public pool on a barge in Barretto Point Park in the Bronx, on Monday to stay cool. (Nick Brandreth for The Wall Street Journal)


Spectators watched the Women’s World Cup final between the U.S. and Japan at 44th and Broadway in Times Square on Sunday. (Mustafah Abdulaziz for The Wall Street Journal)


A crane lowered Ladder 3, a fire truck that responded to the World Trade Center on 9/11, into the exhibition space for the National September 11 Memorial and Museum Wednesday. The memorial is scheduled to open in time for the tenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks. (Andrew Gombert/EPA)


Jose Reyes, the star shortstop for the New York Mets, played in a game for the Mets Class A affiliate Brooklyn Cyclones against the Lowell Spinners in Coney Island Monday. Reyes, who was rehabbing his hamstring, went 1-3 with a double and a run scored. (See related article.) (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


An instructor held up a dragonfly as students Janae Laster, center, and Niyea Simeon, right, watched. The City Parks Foundation’s ‘Green Girls Summer Institute’ took a class of preteen girls to Strack Pond in Forest Park, Queens, Thursday to catch and study insects. (Natalie Keyssar for The Wall Street Journal)


Colin McMullan held a hand-made book at the Corner Library, a microlibrary at the intersection of Leonard and Withers streets in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (See related article.) (Nick Brandreth for The Wall Street Journal)


Profiteroles at Rouge et Blanc at 48 MacDougal Street in Manhattan. (See related article.) (Mimi Ritzen Crawford for The Wall Street Journal)


Nicholas Taylor, left, and Michael Holman of the band Gray rehearsed at the New Museum on Monday afternoon before a performance Thursday night. The band, which was founded with legendary artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, makes industrial sound music. (See related article.) (Natalie Keyssar for The Wall Street Journal)


An artistic re-imagining of a World War I fighter plane is stationed on the roof of 77 Water Street in Manhattan’s Financial District. (See related article.) (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal )


Costumes hang at the TDF Costume Collection at 601 W. 26th. Street in New York. Many costumes from Broadway and Off-Broadway shows end up here after closing night. (Ramsay de Give for The Wall Street Journal )


The LongHouse Reserve, a nonprofit museum/sculpture garden, hosted its annual Summer Gala in East Hampton Saturday. Pictured here, chair sculptures. (See related article.) (Mimi Ritzen Crawford for The Wall Street Journal)


Marc Williamson is the store manager at J.J. Hat Center, at 310 Fifth Avenue in New York. (See related article.) (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)

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Here’s a look inside the Shelton Conn., factory responsible for every single Wiffle Ball that has sailed across backyards since the factory opened in 1959.
(See related article.)

All photographs by Mustafah Abdulaziz for The Wall Street Journal.


Wiffle Ball, Inc.’s one and only factory is located in Shelton, Conn. Here, plastic Wiffle Balls before they are heated and molded.


The top floor of the two-story cinderblock building is devoted to packing and storage. The ground floor has an old office with five desks. And in the next room lies the heart of the 15-employee operation, where two injection-molding machines hum along to produce thousands of Wiffle Balls every day.


A machine sorts and separates the halves that are then merged into one ball.


The factory opened in 1959. David J. Mullany, left, and his brother Steven Mullany, right, runs the company that their grandfather started in 1953.


The ball has always been white plastic and it has always had eight holes.


Playboy magazine once dubbed Wiffle Ball one of the “classic” American brands alongside the likes of Zippo lighters and Monopoly.


Their product is so iconic that a few years ago, the Mullanys trademarked the bright yellow color of their bats, much the same way Tiffany & Co. protects the particular shade of blue on its jewelry boxes.


Here, boxes of bats and Wiffle Balls are stored for shipment.

All photographs by Mustafah Abdulaziz for The Wall Street Journal.

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Having spent a week avoiding the air kissing of the fashionistas and the ire of the paparazzi, Mustafah Abdulaziz sends us his closing report on the elegance, the awkwardness and the absolutely fabulous-ness of New York fashion week.

All photographs by Mustafah Abdulaziz for The Wall Street Journal


The Star Lounge caters to designers, celebrities, and Mercedes-Benz owners.


Ralph Lauren show.


Tibi at the Stage show.


Lincoln Center: No Ticket – No Entry.


Fashion guest Tsetsgee Erdenburen.


Andre Leon Talley, contributing editor for Vogue at the Ralph Lauren show.


Waiting for Ralph Lauren at Skylight, SoHo.


Oscar de la Renta show.


Deaullo Perry (r) and the AJT team unload for the G-STAR RAW show.


Yulu Serao, 15, from Connecticut reads a book after sneaking into fashion week, hoping to glimpse the Charlotte Ronson show.


The back door to the fashion tents, Lincoln Center.


Swept away in a limo, a guest leaves the Calvin Klein show.


Model snubs photographer, after the Jason Wu show


A final parting shot from the Jason Wu show as fashion week draws to a close.

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All photographs by Mustafah Abdulaziz for The Wall Street Journal

View the runway photographs show by show here

Mixtape: The Sounds of New York Fashion Week

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Having spent a week avoiding the air kissing of the fashionistas and the ire of the paparazzi, Mustafah Abdulaziz sends us his closing report on the elegance, the awkwardness and the absolutely fabulous-ness of New York fashion week.

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Back in April, UK’s HUCK Magazine dispatched MJR‘s Mustafah Abdulaziz to photograph the Deftones at their North Hollywood studio in Los Angeles, California in anticipation for the band’s new album, Diamond Eyes (Reprise, Warner Bros), released to critical and commercial success. Download the digital edition of HUCK #21 here.

HUCK Magazine #21
Deftones
HUCK Magazine #211 / 18

The Deftones in North Hollywood. Mustafah Abdulaziz/MJR for HUCK Magazine.
Deftones
The Deftones in North Hollywood. Mustafah Abdulaziz/MJR for HUCK Magazine.2 / 18

The Deftones
Deftones
The Deftones3 / 18

The Deftones
Deftones
The Deftones4 / 18

The Deftones
Deftones
The Deftones5 / 18

HUCK Magazine #21
Deftones
HUCK Magazine #216 / 18

The Deftones
Deftones
The Deftones7 / 18

The Deftones
Deftones
The Deftones8 / 18

HUCK Magazine #21
Deftones
HUCK Magazine #219 / 18

The Deftones
Deftones
The Deftones10 / 18

The Deftones
Deftones
The Deftones11 / 18

The Deftones
Deftones
The Deftones12 / 18

The Deftones
Deftones
The Deftones13 / 18

Abe Cunningham, drums.
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Abe Cunningham, drums.14 / 18

Sergio Vega, bass guitar.
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Sergio Vega, bass guitar.15 / 18

Frank Delgado, keyboards, samples.
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Frank Delgado, keyboards, samples.16 / 18

Stephen Carpenter, guitar.
Deftones
Stephen Carpenter, guitar.17 / 18

Chino Moreno, vocals, guitar.
Deftones
Chino Moreno, vocals, guitar.18 / 18

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