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Original author: 
David Pescovitz

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Sierra Magazine posted their picks of "Earth's Weirdest Landscapes." Some I was familiar with, like the Fly Geyser in Nevada's Black Rock Desert, California's Mono Lake, and Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. But others are new-to-me strange spots that I would be delighted to explore. For example, above is Lake Hillier in Western Australia's Recherche Archipelago. Yes, it really is pink. According too Sierra, "some believe (the hue) comes from a dye produced by two microorganisms called Halobacteria and Dunaliella salina, while others suspect the red halophilic bacteria that thrive in the lake's salt deposits." Earth's Weirdest Landscapes (Thanks, Orli Cotel!)    

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Photo Series: The Beauty of Abandonement 

Sometimes it is simply beautiful and truly inspiring to see what nature does to places that are not influenced by humans any more. 

If it’s a an old ship, a house in the hills or a former train station - enjoy the entire photo series here

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Clever whale sharks have figured out that fishing nets contain a lot of tasty fish. More importantly, they've figured out that they can suck those fish out of the net through holes in the net material.

The downside: When the sharks swim into fishing areas, looking for nets to suck, they can end up caught in the nets themselves. Conservation International took this video, showing why the sharks are hanging out around nets to begin with, as part of a series of videos documenting new net designs that can keep the fishies in and the whale sharks out.

Check out the rest of the video series

Via Charles Q. Choi

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Amazing WaterfallCame across this beautiful and stunning waterfall photo. Unfortunately I don’t know who took it nor where exactly it is, supposedly somewhere in China. HiRes Version (1920×1440)

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I completed the Machine Learning course (Stanford) and got very interested, also after some research, I decided that I'd like to learn nature-inspired algorithms.

I've found some resources like:

The first reference look good and complete with pseudocode (giving me the possibility to implement everything in Ruby, my prefered language), and also gives ruby implementations for every code. But it lacks of exercises to practice, which I think is a key feature.

The second is something that inspired me a lot to start studying this area, but they don't have any course or material to study.

The third one looks good too, but has only a little amount of exercises, and might be too focused (I do like games, but I also want to study everything else related to nature-inspired algorithms). Also it is focused on C++ (not that it is a hard language, but I don't like its limitation compared to ruby), and I'd prefere something in Ruby or pseudocode (although it is not my main priority).

Does anyone know something that also have exercises to complement the theory?
Is there anything better to learn, with a particular focus on exercises? (Maybe courses or video lectures).

Here is a treasure trove of leads for you. In particular, I would recommend this book to you. The author, Xin-She Yang, knows what he is talking about and the book is relatively cheap.

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Nothing will change in their lives because someone will become a president. Nothing will change and they will live in the boundless spaces of the tundra under the enormous northern sky as their...

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