Skip navigation
Help

Occupy wall Street

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Tropical Storm Isaac led organizers to cancel Monday’s lineup at the Republican National Convention, but protests in Tampa went ahead mostly as planned. Some protesters even camped out in the rain on a rented lot, dubbed “Romneyville.” Some met up with a larger group of several hundred activists and “Occupiers,” who marched one mile from Perry Harvey Park to the Tampa Bay Times Forum, where Republican delegates are gathering this week. Hoisting placards and chanting slogans, protesters from as far as California registered their disapproval of the GOP ticket throughout the day. Security was intense. Photographer Grant Cornett was on scene to capture the scene.

Adam Sorensen is an Associate Editor at TIME covering politics.

Grant Cornett is a New York City-based photographer. LightBox previously featured his photography in Beautiful Decay.

0
Your rating: None

When Alex Arbuckle covered the Occupy Wall Street protests, he decided to show a straightforward view of the police. Instead, he found himself arrested. A few days ago, he was vindicated.

0
Your rating: None

May 1 marks International Worker’s Day, and this year Occupy Wall Street and other OWS-friendly groups are planning a day of action with events in cities around the United States. The plans cover a broad spectrum of protest activities, but one thing is sure to be shared by all: wherever there’s a protest, someone is going to try to take a picture of it; New York City’s South Street Seaport Museum, located near Wall Street, is currently exhibiting photographs, including the one seen here, of Occupy protests. But some of those photographers will, if the past is any indication, get arrested.

According to Jay Stanley, who runs the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) project on photographers’ rights, the rising number of arrests is not in photographers’ imaginations: hostility between photographers and the police actually is becoming more common, even though American law guarantees the right to photograph in a public place. Occupy protests have been a consistent source of that tension.

Photojournalists, particularly freelancers, can encounter an extra layer of scrutiny. Mickey Osterreicher, a lawyer on the National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) advocacy committee, says that professionals with obviously high-quality equipment can be targeted, even though the press legally has as much of a right to be in and photograph public places as everyone else does. Especially since the 2011 federal case of Glik v. Cunniffe, in which the court found that a Boston man was not guilty under anti-wiretapping statutes for having videotaped an arrest with his cellphone, the right to photograph the police has been firmly established. Although whether or not the police can look at one’s photos is in the process of being tested in court, police cannot seize a camera without reason. But those legal rights don’t necessarily translate to smooth experiences on the ground.

Beyond knowledge of the law and professional conduct—which means not breaking any other laws, such as trespassing statutes—there’s not much a photographer can do in advance to prevent that kind of hassle. “If you’re arguing with somebody who’s got a badge and a gun, usually you’re going to lose that argument right then,” says Osterreicher, who notes that a photographer’s best recourse usually comes later, in court—which is why it’s helpful to continue to record audio and video, if possible, to preserve a record of one’s interaction with the police.

There are several resources available for photographers who encounter trouble with the law. Here are just a few:

  • Websites like Carlos Miller’s Photography is Not a Crime keep track of the latest developments and news about the topic.
  • NPPA photographers who encounter trouble with the law can reach out to the association’s legal advocacy committee.
  • The ACLU maintains an extensive website to help photographers stay aware of all their legal rights and options—and they also helped with the video posted below.

Osterreicher and the NPPA are working with law enforcement agencies to educate officers about photographers’ rights, with particular attention on avoiding conflict at this year’s upcoming political party conventions. Stanley is also hopeful that, with education, the relationship between police officers and photographers can become a productive one. “I’m optimistic that professional police officers around the country will come to understand that this is a necessary check and balance, and a necessary freedom in a free society,” he says.

The Occupy Wall Street photojournalism exhibition is on view at the South Street Seaport Museum in New York City through July 8.

0
Your rating: None

May 1 marks International Worker’s Day, and this year Occupy Wall Street and other OWS-friendly groups are planning a day of action with events in cities around the United States. The plans cover a broad spectrum of protest activities, but one thing is sure to be shared by all: wherever there’s a protest, someone is going to try to take a picture of it; New York City’s South Street Seaport Museum, located near Wall Street, is currently exhibiting photographs, including the one seen here, of Occupy protests. But some of those photographers will, if the past is any indication, get arrested.

According to Jay Stanley, who runs the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) project on photographers’ rights, the rising number of arrests is not in photographers’ imaginations: hostility between photographers and the police actually is becoming more common, even though American law guarantees the right to photograph in a public place. Occupy protests have been a consistent source of that tension.

Photojournalists, particularly freelancers, can encounter an extra layer of scrutiny. Mickey Osterreicher, a lawyer on the National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) advocacy committee, says that professionals with obviously high-quality equipment can be targeted, even though the press legally has as much of a right to be in and photograph public places as everyone else does. Especially since the 2011 federal case of Glik v. Cunniffe, in which the court found that a Boston man was not guilty under anti-wiretapping statutes for having videotaped an arrest with his cellphone, the right to photograph the police has been firmly established. Although whether or not the police can look at one’s photos is in the process of being tested in court, police cannot seize a camera without reason. But those legal rights don’t necessarily translate to smooth experiences on the ground.

Beyond knowledge of the law and professional conduct—which means not breaking any other laws, such as trespassing statutes—there’s not much a photographer can do in advance to prevent that kind of hassle. “If you’re arguing with somebody who’s got a badge and a gun, usually you’re going to lose that argument right then,” says Osterreicher, who notes that a photographer’s best recourse usually comes later, in court—which is why it’s helpful to continue to record audio and video, if possible, to preserve a record of one’s interaction with the police.

There are several resources available for photographers who encounter trouble with the law. Here are just a few:

  • Websites like Carlos Miller’s Photography is Not a Crime keep track of the latest developments and news about the topic.
  • NPPA photographers who encounter trouble with the law can reach out to the association’s legal advocacy committee.
  • The ACLU maintains an extensive website to help photographers stay aware of all their legal rights and options—and they also helped with the video posted below.

Osterreicher and the NPPA are working with law enforcement agencies to educate officers about photographers’ rights, with particular attention on avoiding conflict at this year’s upcoming political party conventions. Stanley is also hopeful that, with education, the relationship between police officers and photographers can become a productive one. “I’m optimistic that professional police officers around the country will come to understand that this is a necessary check and balance, and a necessary freedom in a free society,” he says.

The Occupy Wall Street photojournalism exhibition is on view at the South Street Seaport Museum in New York City through July 8.

0
Your rating: None

In this week’s photos from around New York, dinosaurs are unloaded in New Jersey, handbell ensembles perform, activists release black balloons at an Apple store and more.

A model apatosaurus, left, and ankylosaurus, right, were unloaded from trailers Wednesday to be assembled and set in place at Field Station
A model apatosaurus, left, and ankylosaurus, right, were unloaded from trailers Wednesday to be assembled and set in place at Field Station: Dinosaurs in Secaucus, N.J. The dinosaur theme park is set to open in late May. (See related article.) (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal )


NASA’s 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, with space shuttle Enterprise mounted atop, flew up the Hudson River past the New York City skyline Friday on its way to JFK International Airport. (See related article.) (Timothy A. Clary/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)


Activists from Greenpeace released black balloons into the glass cube of the Apple store at Fifth Avenue near 58th Street on Tuesday to protest the absence of renewable energy fueling Apple’s cloud-based data storage service. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal )


Four handbell ensembles from New York and Virginia came together at Riverside Church on Sunday for the 34th Annual English Handbell Festival. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)


Ben Nguyen of Vietnam shook hands with U.S. Congressman Jose E. Serrano in an event organized by Citizenship and Immigration Services at a special Earth Day naturalization ceremony at the Bronx Zoo on Sunday. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


The lap pool in the basement of a newly built townhouse on East 74th Street. (See related article.) (Andrew Hinderaker for The Wall Street Journal)


Police on Monday wrapped up the excavation of a basement on Prince Street, where law enforcement officers had been looking for clues in the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz. (See related article.) (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


Police arrested a member of AIDS activist group ACT UP at Wall Street and Broadway, near the New York Stock Exchange, on Wednesday. AIDS activists joined supporters of the Occupy Wall Street movement in a march through lower Manhattan. (See related article.) (Brendan McDermid/Reuters)


A group of Occupy Wall Street protesters were evicted from a Lower Manhattan space that had served as an informal headquarters on Monday. Here, the group gathered their possessions on the sidewalk while they figured out where to move next. (See related article (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal )


Nine people were injured and several trees, street signs, and newspaper stands were damaged in a car crash at the northwest corner of Bryant Park late on Saturday. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)


Donette Skinner, right, 13, cried as she walked home in Harlem. One of her best friends, Annie Fryar, was shot and killed early on Tuesday. Police said Steven Murray fatally shot his teenage half-sister as she slept, turned the gun on his mother and then confronted police in a frenetic shootout on a nearby street. (See related article.) (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)

0
Your rating: None

Writer and comedian John Knefel reaches for his glasses as police pull him away during an Occupy Wall Street protest in New York City yesterday. This really great photo was taken by Jessica Lehrman in the lobby of Winter Garden, a building owned by Brookfield Property, the same company that owns Zuccotti Park. To get a different view on the same scene, check out a video that someone else was filming at the same time. You can see Knefel falling down around 6:30.

The photo and video bring up something interesting. Knefel is a writer and comedian, one of the many people documenting OWS from the inside while trying to navigate the very grey boundaries of journalist and participant in the age of Internet journalism. Personally, I think this conflict is pretty interesting. If I can get all "journalism ethics class" for a minute here, I think OWS is drawing attention to the already existing need for new definitions of who constitutes "media" and who doesn't. Why is this more confusing than you might thing? Let me use Knefel as an example.

Knefel doesn't work for a major media outlet. But he's also not just some random bystander. He's got a political podcast with new episodes three times a week. Do we only call someone a journalist if they have enough page views? Do they have to have a journalism degree? What's the line?

Knefel is a biased source of information. But so are a lot of mainstream commentators. We'd call someone from Fox News a journalist. We'd call someone from Reason magazine a journalist. We'd call somebody from Mother Jones a journalist. Having a clear political angle to your coverage doesn't make you not a journalist. Except when it does. So what are the actual criteria?

Knefel didn't have a press pass. But, as Xeni has pointed out, the press pass system in New York is incredibly convoluted and contradictory. So what if you can't get one? Does that mean you aren't a journalist? This is particularly problematic given the fact that the rules seem to be set up to favor long-standing publications with lots of resources that mostly just cover New York City. How does that fit into a globalized world? Why punish media entrepreneurship?

We live in an age where publishing is easy and the tools to do it are available to a much wider swatch of people. But our standards and rules for who gets protection as a member of the press are based on a paradigm where publishing wasn't easy and only a limited number of people could do it. At the same time, we have to acknowledge that not everybody who uses the Internet is a journalist, because being a journalist comes with responsibilities not just protections. I'm pretty sure my Dad doesn't want to hold his Facebook to the same standard that I use when writing here.

I don't know the answer to these questions. But I know we need to have this conversation. Occupy Wall Street just shows us what can happen when we keep applying old rules to a new world.

0
Your rating: None

And there was a man in a tent, a university professor who had embarked on a hunger strike in demand of an increase in the national minimum wage and financial investment in the state universities. He...

0
Your rating: None