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Steve Jobs

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Three months before Toy Story was released, Pixar owner Steve Jobs took to the stage at the SIGGRAPH conference and explained why the film represented a major leap in film technology. It’s a rare bit of animation history that I was happy to discover on YouTube:

(via @Jonezee99)

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Having been witness to famine and catastrophe, Doug Menuez sought answers in a project that served a purpose and gave guidance, turning his camera on the tech boom occurring right in his Silicon Valley backyard.

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Jobs considers the impact his ouster from Apple had on his feelings in 1985. "I hired the wrong guy. [John Sculley] destroyed everything I spent 10 years working for."

In 1995, Steve Jobs gave a rare interview to Robert Cringely for a PBS special called Triumph of the Nerds to talk about the genesis of the personal computer. Most of the hour-long interview had been cut down to a few minutes to use for the three-part special, and the original master tape was thought to have been lost after production. Shortly after Jobs' death in October 2011, however, director Paul Sen found a VHS copy of the entire interview in his garage. Cringely and Sen worked to clean up the footage and presented "The Lost Interview" in a handful of art house theaters across the country. Magnolia Pictures eventually picked up the remastered footage for wider release, and made it available via iTunes and Amazon Video on Demand this week.

During the interview, Jobs was "at his charismatic best—witty, outspoken, visionary," according to Cringely. Jobs certainly wasn't pulling any punches, blaming Apple's poor performance in the mid-'90s on then-CEO John Sculley's mismanagement, the mediocrity of computing on Microsoft's lack of taste, and a glut of poorly designed consumer gadgets on companies overrun by "sales and marketing people."

To place the interview in context, it was taken about a year or so before Apple bought NeXT for its NextStep operating system, which became the basis for Mac OS X and later iOS. The acquisition also brought its estranged co-founder back to lead the company from near-bankruptcy to soaring profits and market share, with Apple becoming a leader in portable music players, notebook computers, smartphones, and tablets.

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As the source is somewhat less than airtight, you should probably take the following with the biggest grain of salt you can get your hands on — but on the off chance there’s some truth to it, this rumor is too wild not to repeat. A new report claims that George Clooney and Noah Wyle are vying for the lead role in the upcoming Steve Jobs biopic, which is being developed at Sony based on Walter Isaacson‘s bestselling biography. More details after the jump.

The story comes from the UK tabloid The Sun (via Cult of Mac), which reports that the former ER co-stars are competing against each other to play the late Apple co-founder. There probably aren’t many times I’d vote for Wyle over Clooney, but in this case Wyle actually seems like the better choice. For one thing, he’s already played Jobs once, in 1999′s Pirates of Silicon Valley. (Joey Slotnick also starred, as Steve Wozniak, while Anthony Michael Hall played Bill Gates.) For another, while I’m usually in favor of casting Clooney in just about anything, the suave leading man seems like an odd fit for Jobs’ charismatic but prickly demeanor.

Of course, one very likely outcome is that it’ll turn out this entire report is BS and it’ll turn out that neither actor was ever seriously considered for the role. That the studio would be eyeing Clooney seems somewhat believable, if only because the biopic is bound to be big and Clooney’s the kind of huge movie star they might want on their top-tier team. But I’d be very surprised if the powers that be tapped Wyle — who’s doing just fine, but is hardly the first guy you turn to when you’re loking for A-list talent — to reprise his Pirates of Silicon Valley role. In any case, Sony’s scrambling to get the project together quickly, so expect to hear more casting rumors flying around in the coming weeks. Who do you think would be a good fit to play the tech legend?

Just for kicks, here’s a video of Wyle doing his best Jobs at the 1999 Macworld expo:

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The month of October has been a dramatic month of deaths, from Steve Jobs of Apple succumbing to cancer to the demise of former Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi, as well as the dramatic racetrack death of Indianapolis 500 champion Dan Wheldon.   But toward the end of the month, life was celebrated with the birth of the seven billionth person on Earth.  Also in the news was the continued and now global growth of the Occupy Wall Street movement, Palestinian prisoner releases for captured Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit and a devastating earthquake in Turkey. WARNING: Graphic content.

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From continued “Occupy Wall Street” protests and Amanda Knox’s appeal verdict to Steve Jobs’ passing and the tenth anniversary of the U.S. War in Afghanistan, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

See last week’s Pictures of the Week.

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I first met Steve Jobs on a photo shoot for TIME in 1982. I had no idea that he was going to be my friend or that he was going to be this incredible genius — a part of all our lives, in what we do and what we see. He was speaking to a group of Stanford students in a dorm living room, and it was hard to photograph him there and not be in the way. You had to have light, and I was creeping around. But he was game. I asked him to stand on top of an Apple sign, and he did it. I asked him to stand in front of an Apple cutout (which ended up on the cover of Fortune magazine), and he did that too. I thought, This is you. This is who you are.

He was so much fun because he was so quick — he was such a fast study. You showed him anything and he could get it in a second. I was always fascinated by his design sense. It was wonderful because he liked my pictures.

I really will miss his inventiveness, his ideas, his eyes — and how bright he was all over. He had some kind of electricity about him. He was very, very focused in the office. He demanded a lot of the people who worked for him. I’m sure Steve wasn’t the easiest person to work for, but what a fascinating person to work for.

Diana Walker was TIME’s White House photographer for 20 years, where she captured intimate moments with five Presidents. 

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Steve Jobs Patents

Steve Jobs stepped down as CEO of Apple yesterday, and one of the reasons we actually care is because he had a hand in so many major products that we use every day. Shan Carter and Alan McLean, for The New York Times, provide a breakdown of all 313 Apple patents that include Jobs in the group of inventors.

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