Skip navigation
Help

Earth Day

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

In this week’s photos from around New York, dinosaurs are unloaded in New Jersey, handbell ensembles perform, activists release black balloons at an Apple store and more.

A model apatosaurus, left, and ankylosaurus, right, were unloaded from trailers Wednesday to be assembled and set in place at Field Station
A model apatosaurus, left, and ankylosaurus, right, were unloaded from trailers Wednesday to be assembled and set in place at Field Station: Dinosaurs in Secaucus, N.J. The dinosaur theme park is set to open in late May. (See related article.) (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal )


NASA’s 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, with space shuttle Enterprise mounted atop, flew up the Hudson River past the New York City skyline Friday on its way to JFK International Airport. (See related article.) (Timothy A. Clary/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)


Activists from Greenpeace released black balloons into the glass cube of the Apple store at Fifth Avenue near 58th Street on Tuesday to protest the absence of renewable energy fueling Apple’s cloud-based data storage service. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal )


Four handbell ensembles from New York and Virginia came together at Riverside Church on Sunday for the 34th Annual English Handbell Festival. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)


Ben Nguyen of Vietnam shook hands with U.S. Congressman Jose E. Serrano in an event organized by Citizenship and Immigration Services at a special Earth Day naturalization ceremony at the Bronx Zoo on Sunday. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


The lap pool in the basement of a newly built townhouse on East 74th Street. (See related article.) (Andrew Hinderaker for The Wall Street Journal)


Police on Monday wrapped up the excavation of a basement on Prince Street, where law enforcement officers had been looking for clues in the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz. (See related article.) (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


Police arrested a member of AIDS activist group ACT UP at Wall Street and Broadway, near the New York Stock Exchange, on Wednesday. AIDS activists joined supporters of the Occupy Wall Street movement in a march through lower Manhattan. (See related article.) (Brendan McDermid/Reuters)


A group of Occupy Wall Street protesters were evicted from a Lower Manhattan space that had served as an informal headquarters on Monday. Here, the group gathered their possessions on the sidewalk while they figured out where to move next. (See related article (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal )


Nine people were injured and several trees, street signs, and newspaper stands were damaged in a car crash at the northwest corner of Bryant Park late on Saturday. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)


Donette Skinner, right, 13, cried as she walked home in Harlem. One of her best friends, Annie Fryar, was shot and killed early on Tuesday. Police said Steven Murray fatally shot his teenage half-sister as she slept, turned the gun on his mother and then confronted police in a frenetic shootout on a nearby street. (See related article.) (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)

0
Your rating: None

Plastics live forever. Well, that’s not quite true, but a plastic ring or piece of garbage can last for hundreds of years before biodegrading. And much of that plastic ends up in the oceans, where by one estimate there is now more than 300 billion lbs. of plastic waste floating in the water.

Because plastic is so indestructible, it poses a unique threat to marine life. Turtles and fish, dolphins and seabirds can swallow plastic pieces, choking on the garbage. So much plastic has accumulated in the ocean that you can find a Texas-sized patch of the stuff in the North Pacific, concentrated by sea currents. It would take years to clean it all up—and instead, we’re just adding to it every day.

In her photo exhibition Soup, the British photographer Mandy Barker documents plastic debris that’s been salvaged from the sea, transforming marine detritus into the stuff of art. She began working on the project after reading about the Pacific Garbage Patch on the Internet, and started noticing all the trash that would wash up along the beach. “It seems there was more debris, and especially plastic, than there were natural objects,” says Barker. “I wanted to find out why that was.”

Barker received bits of plastics and other trash from beaches around the world, and the result is a kind of collage of the waste we put into the oceans. The photos themselves are beautiful, the plastic bits artfully arranged and shot against a black background. For all their artificiality, they remind me of the images brought back by submarines of weird undersea life, coated in unnatural colors and strange shapes. “I’ve received actual plastic fished out of the sea from a container ship off Alaska,” says Barker. “I was constantly shocked by what I was seeing.”

Barker hopes that her work gives her audience pause as they consider just where their toothbrushes and disposable razors and others shards of the plastic life end up. “Maybe people will think twice before they throw these things away,” she says. We may celebrate Earth Day on April 22, but the oceans—which do cover two thirds of the planet—deserve our protection every day.

Mandy Barker is a British photographer. More of her work can be seen here.

0
Your rating: None

April 22 will mark Earth Day worldwide, an event now in its 42nd year and observed in 175 countries. The original grass-roots environmental action helped spur the Clean Water Act and Clean Air Act in the United States. Gathered here are images of our planet's environment, efforts to utilize renewable alternative sources of energy, and the effects of different forms of pollution. -- Lane Turner and Leanne Burden Seidel (35 photos total)
A ladybug in flight spreads its wings as it flutters from grass blade to grass blade at Rooks Park in Walla Walla, Wash. on April 2, 2012. (Jeff Horner/Walla Walla Union-Bulletin/Associated Press)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

In early April, in an attempt to accelerate the transition of military responsibility to the Afghan government, the US agreed to hand control of special operations missions to Afghan forces, including night raids, relegating American troops to a supporting role. This deal cleared the way for the two countries to move ahead with an agreement that would establish the shape of American support to Afghanistan after the 2014 troop withdrawal deadline. Domestic support for the war (in the US) has dropped sharply. We look back at March in the troubled country. -- Paula Nelson (37 photos total)
Young Afghan women use an umbrella to shield themselves from the sun in Kabul, April 5, 2012. The position of women in Afghanistan has improved dramatically since the fall of the Taliban, with the number of girls in education soaring. But as the Americans and the Afghan government have pursued peace efforts with the Taliban, women are increasingly concerned that gains in their rights may be compromised in a bid to end the costly and deadly war. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

Angryblue will release this insane new art print for Earth Day today. It’s an 11″ x 14″ letterpress print, has an edition of 100, and will cost $30. It goes up today (Friday, April 22nd) at 12pm Eastern Time. Visit Angryblue.com.

0
Your rating: None