Skip navigation
Help

Festival of colors

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
(author unknown)

They keep things out or enclose them within. They're symbols of power, and a means of control. They're canvases for art, backdrops for street theater, and placards for political messages. They're just waiting for when nobody's looking to receive graffiti. Walls of all kinds demarcate our lives. -- Lane Turner (41 photos total).
Note: You can now follow @bigpicture on the social network App.net, where you own your own data. If you'd like to try it out, we've also got some free invites for our readers.
Workers clean the curtain wall of the 40-story National Bank of Economic Social Development in Rio de Janeiro on December 12, 2012. (Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images)     

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
(author unknown)

The National Geographic Traveler Magazine photo contest, now in its 25th year, has begun. There is still plenty of time to enter. The entry deadline is Sunday, June 30, at 11:59 p.m. Entrants may submit their photographs in any or all of the four categories: Travel Portraits, Outdoor Scenes, Sense of Place and Spontaneous Moments. The magazine's photo editors showcase their favorite entries each week in galleries. You can also vote for your favorites. "The pictures increasingly reflect a more sophisticated way of seeing and interpreting the world, making the judging process more difficult," says Keith Bellows, magazine editor in chief. (The captions are written by the entrants, some slightly edited for readability.) As always, you can take a look at some of last year's entries and winners.. -- Paula Nelson ( 40 photos total)
OUTDOOR SCENES - Portrait of an Eastern Screech Owl - Masters of disguise. The Eastern Screech Owl is seen here doing what they do best. You better have a sharp eye to spot these little birds of prey. Okeefenokee Swamp, Georgia, USA. (Photo and caption by Graham McGeorge/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest)     

0
Your rating: None

Today is the vernal equinox, the first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere. It also marks the end of "the winter that wasn't," as the past several months in North America have been dubbed. It was the fourth-warmest winter in the United States since record-keeping began 117 years ago. In accord with the unusual weather, this turn of the season brings us snow in Arizona and Saudi Arabia, while conditions remain sunny and warm in America's Northeast and Western Europe. Collected here are scenes from around the world as a strange winter gives way to spring. [40 photos]

The sun sets behind cherry blossoms which have come into full bloom due to the early warm weather in Washington, D.C., on March 19, 2012. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

0
Your rating: None

The 40th Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race came to an end earlier this week in Nome, Alaska. Dallas Seavey, 25, bested both his father and his grandfather with his team of nine dogs, becoming the youngest musher ever to win the nearly 1,000-mile race across the Alaskan wilderness. His winnings included $50,000 and a new truck. Gathered here are images from the Iditarod and other events from around the globe.(29 photos total)
Pat Moon and his team travel the Kuskokwim River toward McGrath, Alaska, during the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race on March 7. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News/Associated Press)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

Mourning the loss of almost 20,000 people gripped Japan yesterday on the anniversary of the March 11, 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster. While the nation has made enormous strides recovering from the triple disaster, yesterday was was a time for remembrance. But the country is rebuilding even as it still suffers the loss of lives and the economic effects of an estimated $210 billion price tag - the costliest natural disaster in human history. Gathered here are images from memorial services, the rebuilding efforts, and of people forging ahead with altered lives a year on from the catastrophe. -- Lane Turner (40 photos total)
Families release a paper lantern in memory of the victims of last year's earthquake and tsunami, on March 11, 2012 in Natori, Japan. (Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

Photographer Phyllis B. Dooney is documenting the plight of Japan's refugees who fled the nuclear disaster in Fukushima prefecture after the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami. She writes,"In Fukushima Prefecture, the third and most permanent disaster in the series followed; a nuclear meltdown occurred at Tokyo Electric’s Fukushima Daiichi plant. Radiation poured into the atmosphere and environment. First it was a suggestion, but by mid-April the government was enforcing the mandate that the residents of Tomioka and Kawauchi, who hadn’t already left because of the earthquake and/or tsunami damage, leave indefinitely.  Nearly one year later an estimated 80,000 nuclear refugees are living in government-issued temporary housing or elsewhere. In the temporary housing, often just outside the evacuation zone, it is the elderly and mentally or physically disabled who comprise a large percentage of the residents." Collected here are images of those refugees made by Dooney in August of last year and in the last few days. -- Lane Turner (25 photos total)
Masayoshi Katakura stands on the steps of his temporary housing in Koriyama, Fukushima Prefecture, August 16, 2011. Masayoshi, like many others, is frightened and displaced by the earthquake and tsunami but his destitution and hopelessness are a result of the nuclear disaster. (© Phyllis B. Dooney)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

ON STRIKE ON STRIKE: An ill boy lay on a bench at a hospital in Nairobi, Kenya, Friday, where a health-care workers’ strike has brought operations almost to a halt. Public hospitals face a potentially devastating worker shortage after the government said Thursday it had fired 25,000 strikers. (Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images)

LOOKING BACK LOOKING BACK: A man looked for his photographs at a collection center Friday in Sendai, Japan, for items found after the March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami. A year later, more than 250,000 photographs and personal belongings on display for owners to recover. (Toru Hanai/Reuters)

COTTON TRADE COTTON TRADE: A trader checked containers of cotton in Kadi, India, Friday. India partially lifted a ban on cotton exports just days after imposing it, after opposition from the agriculture minister and officials in cotton-growing states, who argued the ban would hurt farmers. (Amit Dave/Reuters)

PURIM NAP PURIM NAP: An Ultra-Orthodox Jewish man slept on a bench in a synagogue in Jerusalem during celebrations for Purim, a holiday marking the Jews’ salvation from genocide in ancient Persia, as told in the Book of Esther. Many religious Jews drink openly during the holiday. (Abir Sultan/European Pressphoto Agency)

ALLERGIC REACTIONS ALLERGIC REACTIONS: Vaishnavi Borde, age 9, received treatment at a hospital in Mumbai after having an allergic reaction to the colored powder traditionally thrown during the Holi festival. A teenage boy died and hundreds have been hospitalized in Mumbai; contaminated paint is suspected. (Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images)

CARGO PLANE CRASH CARGO PLANE CRASH: A man stood next to the wreckage of a cargo aircraft that crashed in the village of Plan de Cedro, Honduras, Thursday. The pilot and co-pilot, the only people on board, were killed in the crash, according to the local media. (Jorge Cabrera/Reuters)

0
Your rating: None

An Indian man dances amid a cloud of colored powder during Holi celebrations in Gauhati, India, Thursday, March 8, 2012. Holi, the Hindu festival of colors, also heralds the coming of spring. Jerry Vonderhaar, left, comforts Charles Kellogg after severe weather hit the Eagle Point subdivision in Limestone County, Ala. on Friday, March 2, 2012. [...]

0
Your rating: None

DRYING OUT
DRYING OUT: Paul Lavers collected laundry from his backyard Thursday in Sydney after flash floods struck the area. Large tracts of the Australian state of New South Wales are under water. (Torsten Blackwood/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

PUCKER UP
PUCKER UP: Mary Robbins prepared a chow chow dog at the Crufts dog show in Birmingham, England, Thursday. (Ben Cawthra/London News Pictures/Zuma Press)

COLORFUL OUTLOOK
COLORFUL OUTLOOK: A man’s face and body were smeared with colored powder during Holi festivities in Mumbai Thursday. (Rajanish Kakade/Associated Press)


PAMPERED POLICE? Traffic police officers showed off neck-support pillows that were given to them by their commander during the National People’s Congress in Beijing Thursday. (Ng Han Guan/Associated Press)

SEND-OFF
SEND-OFF: Soldiers carried torches during a farewell ceremony for former German President Christian Wulff at Bellevue Palace in Berlin Thursday. Mr. Wulff left office under a cloud of suspicion amid allegations concerning political favors. (Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

PRETTY AS A PICTURE
PRETTY AS A PICTURE: Ultra-Orthodox Jewish sisters Simcha, left, and Miri dressed as dolls and stuck their heads in boxes during Purim festivities in Bnei Brak, near Tel Aviv, Thursday. (Ariel Schalit/Associated Press)

0
Your rating: None