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Super Tuesday

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Election Day is going to come quicker than you know.

Long the Republican frontrunner, Mitt Romney has been gradually building momentum towards Nov. 6 since clinching the party nomination on May 29. Now, in the throes of virtually non-stop tours around the U.S. with running mate Paul Ryan, Romney moves to the next stage of his campaign next Monday at the Republican National Convention in Tampa. 

Photographer Lauren Fleishman has watched Romney’s campaign evolve since she first began covering the former Massachusetts governor for TIME. Traveling with him through more than ten states since March, Fleishman became aware of how the Romney-Ryan team began to pull out the stops as the Republican National Convention loomed closer on the horizon.

This past week, as the Romney motorcade raced through Boston, New Orleans and Long Island, N.Y., TIME was granted some rare moments of behind-the-scenes access, as Fleishman tagged along with him at work on the campaign plane, and at a private luncheon with supporters.

(See more: Paul Ryan’s Life and Career in Photos)

The Romney camp, eager to reach crucial members of their party before the 2012 convention, had ratcheted up their game. Campaign events seemed grander; crowds swelled in front of more-energized-than-ever candidates. And, in as controlled an environment as the modern political campaign allows, Romney exuded a new spirit—that of Paul Ryan.

“Now that he has a running mate, the crowd gets really excited—it feels like almost twice the energy,” Fleishman said.

Lauren Fleishman is an award-winning photographer based in New York City. See her previous coverage of Romney on Super Tuesday here.

Related: The Rich History of Mitt Romney

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Photojournalism that caught my eye during the month of March….

Features and Essays

One of my big faves, Tomas Munita, had a series from Cuba for Time to coincide the Papal visit to the country… opening double spread from the latest magazine seen here… Lightbox slideshow through the link…

Tomas Munita: Church and State: The Role of Religion in Cuba (Lightbox)

Side note on the above…what made me fall in love with his work? It was his stunning 2006 Oskar Barnack winning series from Kabul. You can see most of the frames here. Man, Leica, and slide film working in perfect harmony…

Japan. 11 March saw the anniversary of the tsunami…

Nachtwey recently got four double trucks in Time for his Japan 1 Year Later portfolio.Pretty rare these days for something like that to happen I think…

James Nachtwey: Japan One Year After (Lightbox)

Daniel Berehulak: Japan One Year After (NPR)

James Whitlow Delano: Black Tsunami (Vimeo)

David Guttenfelder: Tsunami, Then and Now (SacBee Frame blog)

Alvaro Ybarra Zavala: Route 45: Japan’s Earthquake & Tsunami Anniversary (Reportage)

Espen Rasmussen: Fukushima Fallout (Panos)

Noriko Hayashi: One Year On (Panos)

Dean Chapman: Fading Memories II (Panos)

Hiroko Masuike: A Japanese Community After the Tsunami (NYT Lens) Related

Chris Steele-Perkins: Tsunami Streetwalk, Kesennuma / Streetwalk 2 (Magnum in Motion)

Syria.

Moises Saman: Refugees Flee Syrian Violence in Turkey (NYT)

Ed Ou: Syrians Find Refuge in Lebanon (NYT)

William Daniels: Escape from Syria (Lightbox)

Tyler Hicks: Glimpses of the Armed Opposition in Syria (NYT)

Rodrigo Abd: Inside Syria (Lightbox) from Guardian

Tyrone Turner: Where Slaves Ruled (Brazil) (NGM)

Recent great International Herald Tribune front page pic by Meredith Kohut and the slideshow on NYT.com…

Meredith Kohut: In Salvador, Prisons Packed to the Bars (NYT)

Pete Muller: Ethiopian Forces in Somalia (Newsweek)

Dominic Nahr: On the Ground: Safe fro Kony? (Lightbox)

Adam Dean: Daw Aung San Suu Kyi Campaigns in Myanmar (NYT)

Adam Ferguson: Christians Flee Iraq (NYT)

Ikuru Kuwajima: Astana, Kazakhstan’s Capital Outside In (NYT Lens)

Sergey Kozmin: Elite Russian Military School for Girls (NYT Lens)

Stefano de Luigi: Cinema in Iran (Lightbox)

Eugene Richards: ‘War is Personal’ Continues (Lightbox)

Jocelyn Bain Hogg: British Entertainment (VII)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind: Siberian Supermodels (VII) multimedia

Franco Pagetti: Egypt (VII)

Davide Monteleone: Libya : Winners and Losers (VII)

Stefan Bladh: Youth in Kaliningrad, Russia (Lightbox)

Politics. Russia.

Yuri Kozyrev: On the Campaign Trail with Vladimir Putin (Lightbox)

Politics. US.

This was a TIME magazine cover story early this year…

Christopher Morris: A Day With Obama (VII)

Justin Maxon: On the Trail with Santorum (Lightbox)

Charles Ommanney: Santorum (Newsweek)

Lauren Lancaster: Super Tuesday (New Yorker)

Evan Vucci: GOP Campaign Trail with Instragram (MSNBC photo blog)

Lauren Fleishman: Romney : Super Tuesday (Lightbox)

Stephen Crowley: Smoke-Filled Rooms part 2 (NYT Lens)

Jeroen Oerlemans: Dreaming of Europe (Panos)

Adam Dean: City of Broken Dreams (Panos)

Alfredo Caliz: The Longest Spring (Panos)

William Daniels: Faded Tulips (Lightbox)

Afghanistan.

Alixandra Fazzina: Over Mountains, Underground (NOOR)

Jason P Howe: Afghanistan: Saving Private Bainbridge (Telegraph)

Andrea Bruce: Skiing in Afghanistan (NYT Lens)

Larry Towell: Afghanistan (Lightbox)

Peter Hapak: Olympic Women’s Boxing Hopefuls (Lightbox)

Rian Dundon: A View From Inside The Other New China (Burn)

Spencer Platt: Haiti Landfills (MSNBC photo blog)

Sally Ryan: Home No More (zReportage)

Kate Holt: Education for All (zReportage)

John Pendygraft: If I Die Young (zReportage)

Peggy Peattie: Angels of Milot (zReportage)

Fredrik Naumann: A Voice from Rost (Foto8)

Rob Hornstra: Empty Land, Promised Land, Forbidden Land (Foto8)

Dominic Nahr: Voices of Protest in Senegal (Magnum Photos)

Mila Teshaieva: Promising Waters (Lightbox)

Kevin Frayer: Holi Festivities (SecBee)

Chris Kelly: Situation in Southern Kordofan (Photographer’s archive)

Tomas Wiech: Poland’s Great Adventure (NYT Lens)

Brent Lewin: India’s ‘rat hole’ Mines (National Post)

Pete Pin: Cambodian Americans (NYT Lens)

Martin Parr: Think of Finland (Magnum)

Alejandro Cartagena: Car Poolers (Photographer’s website)

Erica McDonald: Change in Park Slope (NYT Lens)

Ben Lowy: Ohio’s Long Road to Recovery (Reportage by Getty Tumblr)

Graeme Robertson: Portraits of Malawi (Guardian)

Carl de Souza: The Maasai Cricket Warriors (Atlantic) Kenya

Enjoyed these sports pics…

Fred R. Conrad: Spring Training (NYT Lens)

NYT Lens (various photographers): Postcard from London

Kate Peters: Yes, Mistress (Institute)

Jonathan Torgovnik: Rebuilding the DRC (BBC)

Tom Stoddart: Women of Sarajevo Revisited (Reportage)

Bruce Gilden shooting fashion for Vice…

Bruce Gilden: In Broad Daylight (Vice)

Daniel Cuthbert: First on Scene : South African Paramedics (BBC)

Alex Troesch and Aline Paley: Mexican Pointy Boots (Lightbox)

Danko Stjepanovic: North Kosovo (photographer’s website)

Interviews and Talks

“I looked through a lens and ended up abandoning everything else’ – Sebastiao Salgado

Sebastiao Salgado (Guardian)

Sebastiao Salgado (Vimeo)

Excellent 9 minute video by Finnish photographer Rami Hanafi on Martin Parr working in Finland…

Martin Parr : Making of ‘Think of Finland’ (Vimeo)

Zohra Bensemra: My journey into Syria’s nightmare (Reuters)

Ed Kashi (NYT Lens)

Samuel Bollendorff (BJP)

Elliott Erwitt on the art of photographic sequencing (BBC)

Lynsey Addario (Newsweek)

Lynsey Addario (Newsweek)

Davide Monteleone (Develop Tube)

Sean Gallagher (Atlantic)

Alex Prager : this year’s Foam Paul Huf Award winner (BJP)

Sebastian Salgado : The Photographer as an activist (Youtube)

Giles Peress (Youtube)

Pieter Hugo (Vimeo)

Barbara Davidson (LA Times Framework blog)

Homer Sykes (Photoshelter blog)

Olivia Arthur (IdeasTap)

Naomi Harris (Thisisthewhat)

Dominic Bracco II : Turning Point (NYT Lens)

Fiona Rogers (IdeasTap)

Giles Duley : Becoming the Story (TED on Youtube)

Justyna Mielnikiewicz (TED Youtube on Reportage)

Steve Pyke (PicBod)

Mark Power (Impressions Gallery)

John Moore on on ‘Epic’ Libya Battles, Arab World Revolutions (Click)

Shaun Fenn : From Assistant to Photographer: Shaun Fenn’s Professional Transition (PDN)

Articles

Tyler Hicks on his assignment to Syria with late Anthony Shadid…

Tyler Hicks: Bearing Witness in Syria: A Correspondent’s Last Days (NYT)

Javier Espinosa: How I escaped from Homs as Syrian forces closed in (Guardian)

PDN: Remembering 13 Unsung Heroes of Photojournalism

PDN: Paula Lerner Obituary

NYT: Stan Stearns, Photographer of John F. Kennedy Jr.’s Salute to Father, Dies at 76

NYT: Lillian Bassman, Fashion and Fine-Art Photographer, Dies at 94

Lynsey Addario was featured on Guardian’s brilliant ‘Best Shot’ series…

Guardian: Photographer Lynsey Addario’s Best Shot

Guardian: Photographer Tom Craig’s best shot

Related… Guardian: My best shot: The one that got away | For five years, G2 has been asking photographers to tell us the story behind their best shot. But what about their worst? Jane Bown, Martin Parr, Terry O’Neill and others reveal all

And… Guardian: My Worst Shot

Guardian: The Month in Photography

Guardian: Photographs Not Taken: what makes a photographer freeze? | A new book of essays by photographers explores the missed opportunities of images never captured

NYT Lens: Empowerment, Through a Lens

David Campbell: Kony2012, symbolic action and the potential for change

NYT: David LaChapelle, From Photographer to Artist

Verve: Kirsten Luce

Verve: Jeremy Nichol

Verve: Alessandro Grassani

Verve: Jonathan Lewis

Verve: Max Sher

Boston Globe on VII Photo’s Hipstamatic shot exhibition…

photo: John Stanmeyer

Boston Globe: With Hipstamatic app, photojournalists smartphone it in to new exhibit

Nick Stern: Why Instagram photos cheat the viewer (CNN)

PDN: Eggleston’s First-Ever Large Pigment Prints Earn 5.9 Million at Auction

D Perez: Chimping (Vimeo)

FT: What Eve Arnold Saw

Guardian: All About Eve

NYT Lens: Steichen, A New Trove From an Old Master

Diane Smyth: Dana Popa (PhotoMonitor)

BBC: England Uncensored by Peter Dench

Lightbox: DEVELOP Tube: A photographic resource grows

BJP: William Klein will receive the Outstanding Contribution to Photography Award at the Sony World Photogrpahy Awards

BJP: World Photo London is starting next month, packed with talks, seminars and workshops

Eggleston Shore (video on 1000Words blog)

Conscientious: How to make a photobook | related

Gregory Crewdson movie : trailer

PhotoShelter: Should Photo Contests Require Original Image Files?

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

Elles van Gelderen and Ilvy Njiokiktjien won first prize in World Press Photo Multimedia contest for “Afrikaner Blood….Not surprised. I remember telling friends after Perpignan that one of the best things I had seen during the festival was that exact multimedia piece….

photo Ilvy Njiokiktjien

BJP: World Press Photo announces Multimedia contest winners | Related: Bombay FC: WPP Multimedia Judging part 2 . Part 1

Foto8 Summershow 2012

FotoVisura winners…

Photo: Erin Trieb

FotoVisura Photography Grant Winners

BJP: Anastasia Taylor-Lind has won the Center Project Award in Santa Fe

BJP: Paul Graham wins the Hasselblad Foundation International Award for Photography, worth $150,000

Days Japan Photojournalism Awards 2012

Slideluck Potshow is coming to London again….

Slideluck Potshow London IV Submissions | related on Wayne Ford’s blog

NPPA: Justin Maxon, Katie Orlinsky Win 2011 Alexia Foundation Grants

Finland’s press photos of the year…

Sami Kero got the POY with a photo from Cairo…

photo: Sami Kero / Helsingin Sanomat

Finland Press Photos of the Year 2011

London Festival of Photography 2012 Prize

The City of Levallois Photography Award

Eddie Adams Workshop now accepting submissions

LUCEO Student Project Award

KL Photo Awards 2012

Guardian Student Media Awards 2012

Agencies and Collectives

Magnum open to submissions again. Last year they didn’t take any new nominees, if I remember correctly…

photo: Burt Glinn

Apply to become a member of Magnum Photos : 2012 Submissions are now open : Deadline is 08/06/12

photo: Venetia Dearden

VII Photo Newsletter March 2012

Noor newsletter 15 March 2012

Prime Collective March 2012 newsletter

Reportage by Getty Images: Natalie Naccache now part of Emerging Talent

Read about this commercial agency on Twitter… Good line-up of photographers.. including Tom Stoddart..

Making Pictures : commercial photo agency : London

Books

VII Photo’s Questions Without Answers book featured on Phaidon blog…

Photo: Alexandra Boulat

Phaidon: The defining images of our turbulent times…VII: Questions Without Answers

Jörg Colberg: Better by Design: The role of design in the making of five modern photobooks (BJP)

multiMedia

Once Magazine

Blogs

Happy belated birthday to Lightbox!

photo: Joakim Eskildsen

Lightbox: A Year of Great Photography

Photo Archive News

Crowd Funding and related

photo: Andre Liohn

Almost Dawn in Libya aka ADIL (NYT Lens)

Paula Lerner Memorial Fund

Photo Time Machine on Kickstarter

Respecting My Elders on USAProjects

Jobs

Save The Children : 3 month internship opening in the Film&Photo team

Photographers

Thomas Lekfeldt

Tahnia Roberts

Max Strong

Max Fabrizi

To finish off… KillShot: A Rifle Camera for Hunting with Photos Instead of Bullets

And… Britain’s top 10 worst photographers

And… Photographic Moratorium – Looking Sad in the Tub

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Retrospective exhibits, while an enviable chance to create a cohesive story from a lifetime’s worth of work, can be a curator’s nightmare: pieces have to be gathered from all over the world, selected at a distance, organized before they even get to the gallery. Not so the new retrospective of the work of Robert Adams, the photographer famous for documenting the people and landscapes of the American West—both natural and manmade—who is approaching his 75th birthday this May. The show, which opens at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) on March 11, was put together at the Yale University Art Gallery (YUAG) from the master set of thousands of prints donated to the gallery by the photographer in 2004.

“We had time to work with originals and precisely strike a tone that we thought the overall exhibition should have,” says Joshua Chuang of the YUAG, who worked with Adams to curate the images that the show comprises. Adams had preserved the best prints of his work throughout his career and he was instrumental in sculpting the retrospective, which will travel for two years following its time at LACMA. “It’s a very special artist indeed who is the best editor of his own work,” says Chuang. “Adams is really exceptional in that way.”

The resulting show is not intended to be merely a collection of over 300 pictures that happen to be the work of one artist, but rather a single, epic piece of work. It includes each of his major projects, dating back to 1964, and dozens of photo books that he has produced. LACMA’s installation also includes a multimedia reading room and a variety of related programs, from a botany-themed tour to talks with local artists who have been inspired by Adams’ work.

Chuang says that, taken together, the pictures in the show demonstrate how, even though many people think that a camera captures a literal version of the world, the art of photography is one of fiction. “The way that fiction functions is very tricky because it’s using facts to tell a fiction, and it has the appearance of fact,” he says. Robert Adams’ particular devotion to those facts, especially when it comes to capturing the precise look of light that may be flat or boring or dim, was so extreme that the photographer, viewing prints of a photograph taken decades before, was able to describe to curators the exact feeling of standing in a particular spot thirty years ago, and how that feeling ought to come across in the image. Chuang says that such fastidiousness about light means that Robert Adams’ work probably captures the West more accurately than that of the other chronicler of that region, Ansel Adams. But that faithfulness doesn’t mean a lack of artistry. Robert Adams’ skill at capturing nondescript light conjures up an experience—whether it’s in a Target store or the desert—with unexpected intricacy.

“He makes smog in California look ethereal and beautiful,” says Chuang.

And because of his relationship with that state, the photographer’s series of Los Angeles photographs will be highlighted in the show’s LACMA incarnation, in order to allow visitors to compare the environment of their daily lives with the one captured on film, says Edward Robinson, LACMA curator.

“It will be great for people to see this extraordinary photographer’s understanding and exploration of the area, to see how changes in the built environment have been reflected in the landscape,” says Robinson, “and what even the trees can suggest about the use of the land over time.”

Robert Adams: The Place We Live will be on view at LACMA from March 11 through June 3. Find out more about the exhibit here, or visit the YUAG companion site here.

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From thousands of spiders in Australia and a massive ruptured ice wall in Argentina to the aftermath of the U.S. tornadoes and the wake of last year’s Japanese tsunami, TIME’s photo department presents a selection of surprising and surreal vistas from the past week.

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When we arrived in Bab Amr, we began to send e-mails to editors saying we were there. We were excited, happy. Of course, we were scared of the situation, but we were happy.

On the first morning, shelling began very close to us. One boom, then a second. After the third, the Syrians with us shouted, “You have to get out!” Then a fourth rocket hit. We lost Marie Colvin, the American reporter, and my friend Rémi Ochlik, a photographer. The correspondent for Le Figaro, Edith Bouvier, was badly injured, as was Paul Conroy, a British photojournalist.

William Daniels—Panos for TIME

This week's cover of TIME.

The Syrian army targeted Bab Amr everywhere, anywhere. There was no way to get out. One night we visited families staying underground. There were 150 people in a basement with only small lights. They had some rice and a bit of water. Everyone had a family member who had been killed. We felt very bad, thinking, Please help us get out of here; we have lost our friends. But we couldn’t say that, because they had lost everything.

The Syrians who were looking after us were never outwardly scared. They were totally confident. They would prepare medicine in the middle of the room, while we were cowering behind a wall. They were not scared of anything.

Rémi’s death affected me a lot. And perhaps it will affect me even more later. His career was taking off. He had just won the World Press Photo award. He was becoming famous. I was sure he was about to work with magazines he’d dreamed of working for, like TIME. We were excited about getting to Syria. We thought we had a lot of work. I thought, O.K., we’re here, we’ve come for this, to be inside Bab Amr. There was no time to think that maybe we’d made a mistake in going there.

I really liked Rémi. I had a lot of affection for him. Perhaps because I’m older, I felt a bit like an older brother. But sometimes he was the one advising me, especially when we were in dangerous situations. And he just disappeared, so quickly.

Rémi was cremated in Paris on March 6, the first anniversary of the Syrian revolution.

MORE: A Reporter’s Escape from Syria

French photographer William Daniels was on assignment for TIME in the besieged district of Bab Amr. On March 1, after nine days there, he and Edith Bouvier managed to safely cross the border into Lebanon.

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Since the late 19th century, photographers have honed their craft to expose social and political truths existing in their surroundings. The use of collage has expanded on this exploration by allowing artists to reconfigure, cut and fragment photos to create entirely new images and conversations

Utopia/Dystopia: Construction and Destruction in Photography and Collage, a new exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston (MFAH), features 150 years of collage, as well as photomontages and moving images, to present “alternative realities” of utopia or dystopia.

The exhibit has more than 100 works, from as early as the 1860s to the present, with origins spanning Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe. The show is organized around three themes: urban visions, figure construction and the quest for a utopian world, and contains pieces drawn from four museums and private holdings.

Utopia/Dystopia is the brainchild of MFAH associate photography curator, Yasufumi Nakamori. “In breaking and reassembling found images to create a new vision, artists have found collage and montage ideal for expressing utopian dreams and dystopian anxieties,” said Nakamori. Featured artists include El Lissitzky, Okanoue Toshiko, Herbert Bayer, Matthew Buckingham, Tom Thayer, among others, and although their work stems from different artistic movements—from Dada to Constructivism—all the artists embrace the compelling process of photography construction and destruction.

Utopia/Dystopia will be on display through June 10 as part of the FotoFest 2012 Biennial, the largest international photography festival in the U.S. 

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Justin Maxon, who spent the days leading up to Super Tuesday photographing Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum for TIME, started the project new to the political photography scene—but it didn’t take him long to figure out how the campaign events in Ohio would go.

“Every single rally looks the same and sounds the same,” he says. At this point, the candidate’s appearances are fully stage-managed affairs with low levels of access for photographers.

Maxon had noticed that there was a high level of excitement about Santorum, and he wanted to get to the bottom of it, but found it hard to do at official campaign events. “There’s just so much that goes into the image of the candidate,” says Maxon, “that it’s hard to really know what’s orchestrated and what’s real.”

One technique Maxon used to get around the artifice was to look for people and objects that could serve as symbols of the larger issues. He was fascinated by the grassroots enthusiasm for Santorum’s candidacy and the values that underlie that support, so he tried to give visual expression to those ideas.

“There was a family I photographed with four children, and the mother had this 3-week-old baby that she was carrying around,” he recalls of one such example. “In addition to this baby, she had this American flag she was carrying with her, as well. To me, seeing these large families and their patriotism was an insight into the values of the people who support this candidate.”

Another way Maxon explored the campaign was to leave the political events behind. At one rally, the photographer met Pastor Lonnie Vestal, who is featured in the photo gallery above. Not normally a political man, Vestal had become excited about Santorum’s message. He invited Maxon to attend Sunday services at his church, the Way of the Cross Pentecostal Church in Mason, Ohio, and then to go canvassing after the prayers, walking from home to home and trying to engage in political dialogues with residents.

The pastor was not the only such person he met. “I’ve been talking to people and trying to grasp why people are really interested in Santorum.” With his photographs from Ohio, Maxon says he wants viewers to get an impression of not just the reasons that people gave for their enthusiasm about the candidate—mostly “issues involving the home,” he says—but also his own perceptions of how the Santorum campaign is striving to encourage those feelings.

“Part of telling the story is hearing people’s stories,” he says. “I’ve been trying to weave together what people are saying and the things that I’m actually seeing.”

Justin Maxon is a California-based photographer and a recent recipient of a Magnum Emergency Fund Grant. See more of his work here, or on LightBox.

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In the days leading up to yesterday’s Super Tuesday primary contests, Republican candidate Mitt Romney set his sights on Ohio, a swing state that has played a crucial role in recent presidential elections. Photographer Lauren Fleishman, who was photographing the candidate for TIME, did the same.

“I have been here before. It’s what I remember,” she says of the state, where she previously spent time working on an extensive personal project about the Amish. “The landscape still looks the same.” And, although the photographer was focused on a different kind of Ohioan this time around, she found that, while Romney was the star of the scene, the people of Ohio were still the highlight of the trip.

Photo opportunities with Romney were highly controlled—something that Justin Maxon, who was also photographing Super Tuesday for TIME, found to be equally true for Rick Santorum’s campaign. It was especially so after when Fleishman left her car to join the official campaign bus. The increase in access, the backstage passes, was paid for in limitations on where and when the photographer could stand and shoot. Taking those photographs was an artistic and technical challenge—how to make a good picture when you can’t get close enough?—but Fleishman found that the people who turned up to see the candidate were the real source of interest.

For example, at a factory in Canton, Ohio, on Monday, Fleishman turned her camera to the workers. “They were in their work outfits, which is just jumpers and construction hats, because they went to work on a Monday and a lot of them, I was told, didn’t even know that there was going to be something going on,” she says. “For me the most exciting thing is getting to see the people from each town come out, and to speak to them and to see their faces.”

From Dayton to Youngstown, each town had its own character—and each town had its own characters. Each campaign event presented the photographer with one group of people that made up one piece of Ohio. As the campaign bus traveled through the state, the photographer was able to put those pieces together, many portraits of people becoming a portrait of a state. And yesterday, anticipating leaving the state to join Romney as he waited for the day’s results in Boston, Fleishman hoped that her photographs from Ohio would show the state itself as a part of a larger puzzle.

“You get these little glimpses into different towns,” she says. “I want the photographs in some way to show a portrait of America through the candidate.”

Lauren Fleishman is an award-winning photographer based in New York City. See more of her work here and her last post on LightBox here

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AWAITING ROMNEY
AWAITING ROMNEY: A worker waited for Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney to tour Gregory Industries during a campaign stop in Canton, Ohio, Monday. Ohio is one of 10 states that will hold primaries and caucuses on Super Tuesday. (Brian Snyder/Reuters)

BANDAGED
BANDAGED: A woman was treated at a hospital Monday in Brazzaville, Congo, after an explosion at a munitions depot killed more than 200 people and trapped hundreds in debris Sunday. Detonations still shook the capital Monday and fire threatened a second arms depot. (Marc Hofer/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

VIBRANT COLOR
VIBRANT COLOR: Spanish bullfighter Juan Jose Padilla performed during a bullfight in Olivenza, Spain, Sunday. Mr. Padilla, who lost sight in one eye and has partial facial paralysis after being gored, returned to the bullring months after his injury. (Daniel Ochoa de Olza/Associated Press)

TOPPED OFF
TOPPED OFF: An officer put a cap on a paramilitary recruit’s head as they take participated in a training session at a military base in Nanjing, Jiangsu province, China, Monday. (Leo Lang/Reuters)

MONKEY BY THE SEA
MONKEY BY THE SEA: A girl walked with her pet monkey on a promenade along the Arabian Sea in Mumbai Monday. (Danish Siddiqui/Reuters)

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