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anonymity network

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angry tapir writes "Security researchers have identified a botnet controlled by its creators over the Tor anonymity network. It's likely that other botnet operators will adopt this approach, according to the team from vulnerability assessment and penetration testing firm Rapid7. The botnet is called Skynet and can be used to launch DDoS (distributed denial-of-service) attacks, generate Bitcoins — a type of virtual currency — using the processing power of graphics cards installed in infected computers, download and execute arbitrary files or steal login credentials for websites, including online banking ones. However, what really makes this botnet stand out is that its command and control (C&C) servers are only accessible from within the Tor anonymity network using the Tor Hidden Service protocol."

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Cyberoam, a maker of appliances designed to secure sensitive networks, said it has issued an update to fix a flaw that could be used to intercept communications sent over the TOR anonymity network.

Cyberoam issued the hotfix on Monday to a variety of its unified threat management tools. The devices, which are used to inspect individual packets entering or exiting an organization's network, previously used the same cryptographic certificate. Researchers with the TOR network recently reported the flaw and said it caused a user to seek a fake certificate for thetorproject.org when one of the DPI (or deep packet inspection) devices was being used to monitor his connection.

"Examination of a certificate chain generated by a Cyberoam DPI device shows that all such devices share the same CA certificate and hence the same private key," TOR researcher Runa A. Sandvik wrote in a blog post published last Tuesday. "It is therefore possible to intercept traffic from any victim of a Cyberoam device with any other Cyberoam device—or to extract the key from the device and import it into other DPI devices, and use those for interception." Someone commenting on the post went on to publish the purported private key used by the Cyberoam certificate.

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