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This is a guest post written by Claude Johnson, a Lead Site Reliability Engineer at salesforce.com.

The following is an architectural overview of salesforce.com’s core platform and applications. Other systems such as Heroku's Dyno architecture or the subsystems of other products such as work.com and do.com are specifically not covered by this material, although database.com is. The idea is to share with the technology community some insight about how salesforce.com does what it does. Any mistakes or omissions are mine.

This is by no means comprehensive but if there is interest, the author would be happy to tackle other areas of how salesforce.com works. Salesforce.com is interested in being more open with the technology communities that we have not previously interacted with. Here’s to the start of “Opening the Kimono” about how we work.

Since 1999, salesforce.com has been singularly focused on building technologies for business that are delivered over the Internet, displacing traditional enterprise software. Our customers pay via monthly subscription to access our services anywhere, anytime through a web browser. We hope this exploration of the core salesforce.com architecture will be the first of many contributions to the community.

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The corporate data center is undergoing a major transformation the likes of which haven't been seen since Intel-based servers started replacing mainframes decades ago. It isn't just the server platform: the entire infrastructure from top to bottom is seeing major changes as applications migrate to private and public clouds, networks get faster, and virtualization becomes the norm.

All of this means tomorrow's data center is going to look very different from today's. Processors, systems, and storage are getting better integrated, more virtualized, and more capable at making use of greater networking and Internet bandwidth. At the heart of these changes are major advances in networking. We're going to examine six specific trends driving the evolution of the next-generation data center and discover what both IT insiders and end-user departments outside of IT need to do to prepare for these changes.

Beyond 10Gb networks

Network connections are getting faster to be sure. Today it's common to find 10-gigabit Ethernet (GbE) connections to some large servers. But even 10GbE isn't fast enough for data centers that are heavily virtualized or handling large-scale streaming audio/video applications. As your population of virtual servers increases, you need faster networks to handle the higher information loads required to operate. Starting up a new virtual server might save you from buying a physical server, but it doesn't lessen the data traffic over the network—in fact, depending on how your virtualization infrastructure works, a virtual server can impact the network far more than a physical one. And as more audio and video applications are used by ordinary enterprises in common business situations, the file sizes balloon too. This results in multi-gigabyte files that can quickly fill up your pipes—even the big 10Gb internal pipes that make up your data center's LAN.

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Facebook is liberating a large collection of libraries that it uses internally for C++ development. The code is available from a public GitHub repository where it is distributed as open source under the permissive Apache Software License.

The assortment of frameworks is collectively called Folly, the Facebook Open Source Library. Its individual components support a diverse spectrum of capabilities, ranging from general-purpose programming functionality to more specialized pieces that are designed to help developers wring extra performance out of complex applications.

Among many other things, the Folly libraries simplify concurrency, string formatting, JSON manipulation, benchmarking, and iterating over collections. They also offer optimized drop-in replacements for several C++ standard library classes, including std::string.

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Oracle has declined to patch a critical vulnerability in its flagship database product, leaving customers vulnerable to attacks that siphon confidential information from corporate servers and execute malware on backend systems, a security researcher said.

Virtually all versions of the Oracle Database Server released in the past 13 years contain a bug that allows hackers to perform man-in-the-middle attacks that monitor all data passing between the server and end users who are connected to it. That's what Joxean Koret, a security researcher based in Spain, told Ars. The "Oracle TNS Poison" vulnerability, as he has dubbed it, resides in the Transparent Network Substrate Listener, which routes connections between clients and the database server. Koret said Oracle learned of the bug in 2008 and indicated in a recent e-mail that it had no plans to fix current supported versions of the enterprise product because of concerns it could cause "regressions" in the code base.

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Sparrowvsrevolution writes "CryptDB, a piece of database software that MIT researchers presented at the Symposium on Operating System Principles in October, allows users to send queries to an encrypted SQL database and get results without decrypting the stored information. CryptDB works by nesting data in several layers of cryptography (PDF), each of which has a different key and allows a different kind of simple operation on encrypted data. It doesn't work with every kind of calculation, and it's not the first system to offer this sort of computation on encrypted data. But it may be the only practical one. A previous crypto scheme that allowed operations on encrypted data multiplied computing time by a factor of a trillion. This one adds only 15-26%."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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