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mask.of.sanity writes "Criminals have stolen millions from three unnamed U.S. banks by launching slow and stealthy denial of service attacks as a distraction before attacking wire payment switches. The switches manage and execute wire transfers and could have coughed up much more cash should the attackers have pressed on. RSA researcher Limor Kessem said, 'The service portal is down, the bank is losing money and reliability, and the security team is juggling the priorities of what to fix first. That's when the switch attack – which is very rare because those systems are not easily compromised [and require] high-privilege level in a more advanced persistent threat style case – takes place.'"

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Jeremy Edberg, the first paid employee at reddit, teaches us a lot about how to create a successful social site in a really good talk he gave at the RAMP conference. Watch it here at Scaling Reddit from 1 Million to 1 Billion–Pitfalls and Lessons.

Jeremy uses a virtue and sin approach. Examples of the mistakes made in scaling reddit are shared and it turns out they did a lot of good stuff too. Somewhat of a shocker is that Jeremy is now a Reliability Architect at Netflix, so we get a little Netflix perspective thrown in for free.

Some of the lessons that stood out most for me: 

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Aurich Lawson / HBO

This week, as revelations about the extent of National Security Agency (NSA) spying continued to unfold, Ryan Gallagher brought us an article about the types of hardware that agencies outside of the NSA use to gather information from mobile devices. These agencies, which include local law enforcement as well as federal groups like the FBI and the DEA, use highly specialized equipment to gain information about a target. Still, the details about that hardware is largely kept secret from the public. Gallagher summed up what the public knows (and brought to light a few lesser-known facts) in his article, Meet the machines that steal your phone’s data.

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It’s the final lap of the 73BC Nicopolis GP and the crowd are going walnuts. After narrowly avoiding a crashed chariot in lane 4 and the threshing wheel blades of the mad Scythian in lane 6, I whip my knackered nags through an unexpected gap in the frontrunners, and find myself leading by a good pertica. There’s now only one 180-degree turn and a furlong of foam-flecked dust between me and 25,000 denarius. This is it. My team, The Ballista Boys, are about to write themselves into chariot racing history.

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TV Gamer, July 1984 - It's not often you find gold in old game magazines, but man, this is absolutely fascinating. "How to play Adventures in the 1990s" by Richard Porch is a fever dream of what Arcades would be like in the decade coming up.

This was written in 1984 - directly in the middle of the American Video Game Crash (though written in the UK) and a few years after Tron happened and no idea on how Japan developers like Nintendo and Sega would change the world in a year or two. It's about how Arcades will evolve into giant Blade Runner style buildings where arcade games will be "modules" and essentially become the giant Vegas style casinos we see today.

It's an absolutely fascinating read to see what this guy thought would happen in the 90s, much like how Back to the Future expected 2015 to be pretty wild. It's so fascinating that I've transcribed the whole article here for easier reading.

I don't know where you are now, Richard Porch, but you're probably disappointed.

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