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Hi, I'm working on the National Vulnerability Database (NVD). I want to categorise the vulnerable software by category. I already have the categories and a good training set to feed into a machine learning algorithm.

The original idea was to use the description of the vulnerability in NVD to categorise the software, but this won't obviously work (because it doesn't describe the software).

Then we thought to download the first paragraph of the Wikipedia entry for that software. This works only 10% of the time, as many entries do not match any page. This is an example of a page that cannot load Further manual google queries seem to identify that software as a VOIP server. In some other cases, e.g. for the software Swift, the returned page is definitely not related to the software, and in the disambiguation page#Software_and_information_technology) it is not even clear which entry should be the one of interest.

Do you have suggestions to mitigate this problem? More reliable software-related databases other than wikipedia? Better ways to query the dataset instead of feeding the bare software name provided by NVD (e.g. up-ux_v, vendor:Nec)? Ways to include the vendor in the query, so to make the results more reliable?

Ever faced a problem like that?

Thanks!

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Recruiters looking at resumes

In a study by TheLadders (of n equals 30), recruiters looked at resumes and make some judgments. During evaluations, eye tracking software was employed, and they found that the recruiters spent about six seconds on a resume looking for six main things: name, current company and title, previous company and title, previous position start and end dates, current position start and end dates, and education. After that, it was a crapshoot.

Beyond these six data points, recruiters did little more than scan for keywords to match the open position, which amounted to a very cursory "pattern matching" activity. Because decisions were based mostly on the six pieces of data listed above, an individual resume’s detail and explanatory copy became filler and had little to no impact on the initial decision making. In fact, the study’s eye tracking technology shows that recruiters spent about 6 seconds on their initial "fit/no fit" decision.

If I ever have to submit a resume, I'm just going to put those six things as bullets and then the rest will all be keywords in small, light print. It'll be like job search SEO.

Update: I've been told that TheLadder's reputation might be less than savory, and a quick search shows some in agreement, so it might be wise to sidestep the service. Instead, go with my awesome six-bullet advice and you're gold.

[via @alexlundry]

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About

Mother of God… is a rage comic character of a man staring intently at something as he takes his sunglasses off. It can be also used outside of rage comics to express astonishment or disbelief in response to a shocking image or a video. Similar to the colloquial usage of the phrase, the reaction face can be used to either indicate approval or disapproval, depending on the context. When used in the context of rage comics, it is usually preceded by a stick-figure drawing of the same man humming and walking with sunglasses still on.

Origin

The rage face originally came from a panel of KC Green’s web comic titled “Euclids on the Block” featuring the famous Greek mathematician (shown below, left). The comic was initially posted on his Livejournal sometime in August 2008 and later included in his Blog Comix (Blomix) series.[1] KC Green is also aware that his comic has been adapted into this meme[2].

Meanwhile, the earliest known instance of the comic to date was submitted by FunnyJunk user TehEman in a post titled “mother of god”[3] (shown above, right) on May 26th, 2010. According to Know Your Meme user petoulachi, an unspecified instance of the comic has been seen on 4chan as early as on June 17th, 2010.

Etymology & Precursor

According to Wikipedia[12], “Mother of God” is an imprecise translation of the Theotokos, the Greek title of Mary, the mother of Jesus, which is often used in Eastern Orthodox churches and misinterpreted in Roman Catholics and Anglicans. Prior to its rage comic adaptation, the phrase “mother of god” had been iterated in popular films and TV shows, most notably in the opening scene of the 2001 comedy film Super Troopers (shown below) and alternatively as the title or filename of images, videos or threads depicting sights of absolute WIN or FAIL.

Spread

On July 29th, 2010, the reaction face image was uploaded onto Flickr[11] by user RocketsToVenus.Throughout the latter half of the year, the “Mother of God” rage comic series gradually caught on with FunnyJunk users. In the following year, the comics spread to other image-sharing platforms like Tumblr[5] and Reddit[4], as well as internet humor blogs like Memebase[13], ZipMeme[8] and MemeCenter[9] among others. As of July 2012, a keyword search for “Mother of God” on FunnyJunk[14] yields more than 1,050 image results. In addition, the reaction face has been adapted into an image macro series on Quickmeme[6] and Memegenerator[7], while the expression has also spawned various derivatives based on the snowclone “Mother of X.”

Notable Examples

Blank Template

Search Interest

External References

[1] KC Green Dot com – Euclids on the Block

[2] Formspring – KC Green answer

[3] FunnyJunk – Mother of God

[4] Reddit – Search Results for Mother of God

[5] Tumblr – Tagged Results for Mother of God

[6] Quickmeme – Mother of God!

[7] Cuanto Cabron – Ayuda a tu abuelita

[8] ZipMeme – Mother of God

[9] MemeCenter – Mother of God

[10] Memegenerator – Mother of God

[11] Flickr – Mother of God Meme

[12] Wikipedia – "Theotokos":en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theotokos#Mother_of_God

[13] Memebase – Mother of God

[14] FunnyJunk – Search Results for Mother of God=

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