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Patrick Traylor

Heather Rousseau spent ten days last fall photographing and interviewing people living and working in western Colorado, documenting their relationships with the land, energy and water. “Last summer, Colorado—like much of the rest of the country—saw some of the driest and hottest conditions on record,” recalls Rousseau. “Since 80 percent of the state’s population lives [...]

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New submitter jhantin writes "The Bitcoin blockchain has forked due to a lurking backward-compatibility issue: versions older than 0.8 do not properly handle blocks larger than about 500k, and Slush's pool mined a 974k block today. The problem is that not all mining operations are on 0.8; blocks are being generated by a mix of several different versions of the daemon, each making its own decision as to which of the two forks is preferable to extend, and older versions refuse to honor or extend from a block of this size. The consensus on #bitcoin-dev is damage control: miners need to mine on pre-0.8 code so the backward-compatible fork will outgrow and thus dominate the compatibility-breaking one; merchants need to stop accepting transactions until the network re-converges on the backward-compatible fork of the chain; and average users can ignore the warning that they are out of sync and need to upgrade." Turns out there's an approximately 512K limit to atomic updates in Berkeley DB which were used by versions prior to 0.8. 0.8 uses a new database, allowing blockchains that old versions won't accept to be created.

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An anonymous reader sends this excerpt from IEEE Spectrum's Nanoclast blog:
"One of the fundamental problems with fuel cells has been the cost of producing hydrogen. While hydrogen is, of course, the most abundant element, it attaches itself to other elements like nitrogen or fluorine, and perhaps most ubiquitously to oxygen to create the water molecule. ... Now researchers at University of California, San Diego have developed a quite different approach to mimicking photosynthesis for splitting water molecules by using a 3D branched nanowire array that looks like a forest of trees. ... The nanowire forest [uses] the process of photoelectrochemical water-splitting to produce hydrogen gas. The method used by the researchers, which was published in the journal Nanoscale (abstract), found that the forest structure of the nanowires, which has a massive amount of surface area, not only captured more light than flat planar designs, but also produced more hydrogen gas."


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Former First Lady Betty Ford is honored and remembered at her funeral and tribute at St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church in Palm Desert; the head of France’s Debout La Republique party stages a one-man protest during a debate at the French Assembly in Paris; in southwestern France, animated young fans atop a crane sporting the national flag wait for competitors in the Tour de France cycling race to pass by.

From Phoenix, we have three images of a baseball fan almost falling from the stands while trying to catch a ball during a home run derby (read more); at the British Open, John Daly doesn’t disappoint with his choice of golfing pants; we see a colorful mural in Havana; passengers on a brightly painted bus in Islamabad, Pakistan, pass the scene of an explosion.

These are a just few of the highlights; we have many more images for you from around the world today.

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Patrik Stollarz / AFP - Getty Images

A merry-go-round turns inside the cooling tower of the former nuclear power plant in Kalkar, western Germany, on May 28. The plant was constructed from 1977 to 1986. Now it has been converted to a leisure park and receives some 600,000 visitors a year.

Patrik Stollarz/ AFP - Getty Images

Visitors sit in a merry-go-round in front of the cooling tower of the former nuclear power plant in Kalkar, western Germany, near the border with the Netherlands, on May 28. The plant was constructed from 1977 to 1986, but was never operating as nuclear power plant.

Patrik Stollarz/ AFP - Getty Images

Visitors sit in a merry-go-round turning on the compound of the former nuclear power plant in Kalkar, western Germany, near the border with the Netherlands, on May 28. The plant was constructed from 1977 to 1986, but was never operating as nuclear power plant. Today, the plant, built at a cost of some 7 billion Deutsche Mark, was converted to a leisure fun park "Wunderland Kalkar" and receives some 600,000 visitors a year and employs about 550 people on the high season

The German government announced Monday that it would shut down all 17 of its nuclear power plants by 2022, which means that this incongruous sight could become the norm across the country.

Read an analysis of the German decision and the likelihood of other nations following suit.

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