Skip navigation
Help

oil and gas

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Given that we now know that the National Security Agency (NSA) has the ability to compromise some, if not all of VPN, SSL, and TLS forms of data transmission hardening, it’s worth considering the various vectors of technical and legal data-gathering that high-level adversaries in America and Britain (and likely other countries, at least in the “Five Eyes” group of anglophone allies) are likely using in parallel to go after a given target. So far, the possibilities include:

  • A company volunteers to help (and gets paid for it)
  • Spies copy the traffic directly off the fiber
  • A company complies under legal duress
  • Spies infiltrate a company
  • Spies coerce upstream companies to weaken crypto in their products/install backdoors
  • Spies brute force the crypto
  • Spies compromise a digital certificate
  • Spies hack a target computer directly, stealing keys and/or data, sabotage.

Let’s take these one at a time.

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
Patrick Traylor

Heather Rousseau spent ten days last fall photographing and interviewing people living and working in western Colorado, documenting their relationships with the land, energy and water. “Last summer, Colorado—like much of the rest of the country—saw some of the driest and hottest conditions on record,” recalls Rousseau. “Since 80 percent of the state’s population lives [...]

0
Your rating: None


TEDxOjai - Behrokh Khoshnevis - Contour Crafting: Automated Construction

Behrokh Khoshnevis is a professor of Industrial & Systems Engineering and is the Director of Manufacturing Engineering Graduate Program at the University of Southern California (USC). He is active in CAD/CAM, robotics and mechatronics related related research projects that include the development of novel Solid Free Form, or Rapid Prototyping, processes (Contour Crafting and SIS), automated construction of civil structures, development of CAD/CAM systems for biomedical applications (eg, restorative dentistry, rehabilitation engineering, haptics devices for medical applications), autonomous mobile and modular robots for assembly applications in space, and invention of technologies in the field of oil and gas. His research in simulation has aimed at creating intelligent simulation tools that can automatically perform many simulation functions that are conventionally performed by human analysts. His textbook, "Discrete Systems Simulation", and his simulation software EZSIM benefit from some aspects of his research in simulation. He routinely conducts lectures and seminars on invention and technology development. He is a Fellow member of the Society for Computer Simulation and a Fellow member of the Institute of Industrial Engineering. He is a senior member of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. His website: www-rcf.usc.edu In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At <b>...</b>
From:
TEDxTalks
Views:
72

6
ratings
Time:
12:00
More in
Science & Technology

0
Your rating: None

Before the Lights Go Out
is Maggie's new book about how our current energy systems work, and how we'll have to change them in the future. It comes out April 10th and is available for pre-order now. (E-book pre-orders coming soon!) Over the next couple of months, Maggie will be posting some energy-related stories based on things she learned while researching the book. This is one of them.

Steve_Saus submitterated this video that combines 14 years of weather radar images with a soothing piano concerto. It's a neat thing to watch a couple minutes of (though I'm not sure I needed to sit around for all 33 minutes of the video). It also reminded me of something really interesting that I learned about U.S. weather patterns and alternative energy.

Weather data, like the kind visualized here, can be collected, analyzed, and turned into algorithms that show us, in increasingly granular detail, what we can expect the weather to do in a specific part of the United States. Today, you can even break this information down to show what happens in one small part of a state compared to another small part. And that's important. As we increase our reliance on sources of energy that are based on weather patterns, this kind of information will become crucial to not only predicting how much power we can expect to get from a given wind farm, but also in deciding where to build that wind farm in the first place.

Take Texas as an example, which has the most installed wind power capacity of any U.S. state. That's great. Unfortunately, most of those wind farms are built in places where we can't use the full benefit of that wind power, because the wind peaks at night—just as electricity demand hits its low point. A simple change in location would make each wind turbine more useful, and make it a better investment.

It works like this ...

Wind patterns vary a lot from place to place and season to season, says Greg Polous, Ph.D., a meteorologist and director of V-Bar, LLC, a company that consults with energy companies about trends in wind patterns. In general, though, wind farms from Texas to North Dakota are subject to something called the Great Plains Low Level Jet.

This phenomenon happens because said Plains are flat. There's very few geographic features out there to impede the strong winds that blow through the region. During the day, heat rising off the ground causes turbulence and friction in the atmosphere above the Plains, slowing the wind down somewhat. But at night, that turbulence disappears, and the wind accelerates.

There are exceptions to this rule, however, and they are really interesting. If you build a wind farm out in far West Texas, you have to deal with the Great Plains Low Level Jet—hitting the peak in wind power and potential electric production at the same time the grid hits its nadir in electric demand. That's no good, because there's no storage on the electric grid. All that potential electric power the turbines could be producing at night simply goes to waste if nobody wants it.

But, if you build your wind farm on Texas' Gulf Coast, you don't have that problem. Instead, a coastal turbine would be subject to the Sea Breeze Effect, caused by differences in temperature between the air above the water and the air above the land. In those places, wind power—and electric generation—actually peaks on summer afternoons, right when demand for electricity is peaking, too.

Today, oil and gas companies spend a lot of time and money prospecting for new reserves of fuel. In the future, we'll prospect for wind and solar, too, using weather pattern data to spot the best sites where we get the most energy bang for our infrastructure buck.

Image: Mystery Photo, a Creative Commons Attribution (2.0) image from randa's photostream

0
Your rating: None

 Kallamity's World of Mecha Design Part One

Images and book description are from Design Studio Press:

Kallamity (Luca Zampriolo) creates an imaginary future world dominated by dark undertones where protagonist robots (Hard Doll Machines a.k.a. H.D.M.s) mass-produced from recycled metal are needed in a failing society to secure resources for mankind in order to progress its technology.

Kallamity poses the question, "As oil and gas are depleted in the future and inhabitants of Planet Earth continue to grow exponentially, how will a world based on the exploitation of these two natural resources maintain its current technological growth?" and then he precedes to present amazing visuals for the answer in the form of ABAKAN 2288.

In this Sci-fi tale, with oil resources tapped out and the ensuing crash of the world economy, the Weingart family holds a dictatorial monarchy over Earth as a result of their development of WEIN technology which allows for the fabrication of H.D.M.s as well as travel to other planets for more natural resources.

ABAKAN 2288 not only focuses on the images for the world that is yet to be but also on the creation of the Hard Doll Machine mecha designs. Kallamity designs the master patterns that are cast, assembles and creates machine dolls from these pieces of various sizes; ranging from a volleyball to the head of a pin. Being a worldwide success as a collectible sculptor of machine warrior dolls, readers will learn from one of the best in the industry how to conceptualize, fabricate and finish machine robots.

Kallamity combines mecha designs with the steampunk aesthetic to create the stunning yet depleted Sci-fi world of ABAKAN that we hope to not have to occupy someday, as visually captivating as it is!

ABAKAN 2288: kallamity's world of mecha design part one is available at Amazon (US | CA | UK | DE | FR | IT | ES | JP | CN) and Book Depository (US | UK)

 Kallamity's World of Mecha Design Part One - 01

 Kallamity's World of Mecha Design Part One - 02

 Kallamity's World of Mecha Design Part One - 03

 Kallamity's World of Mecha Design Part One - 04

 Kallamity's World of Mecha Design Part One - 05

 Kallamity's World of Mecha Design Part One - 06

 Kallamity's World of Mecha Design Part One - 07

 Kallamity's World of Mecha Design Part One - 08

 Kallamity's World of Mecha Design Part One - 09

Visit Amazon to check out more reviews.

If you buy from any links on the blog, I get a little commission that helps me get more art books to feature.

This book is available at:
Design Studio Press | Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk | Amazon.de | Amazon.fr | Amazon.it | Amazon.es | Amazon.co.jp | Amazon.cn | Bookdepository.com | Bookdepository.co.uk

0
Your rating: None