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Original author: 
Sean Gallagher


The MT.Gox lookalike site that delivered malware to unwitting Bitcoiners.

In another example of the security mantra of "be careful what you click," at least one Bitcoin trader has been robbed in a forum "phishing" attack designed specifically to ride the hype around the digital currency. The attack attempts to use Java exploits or fake Adobe updates to install malware, and it's one of the first targeted attacks aimed at the burgeoning business of Bitcoin exchanges.

The bait for the attack was a post to a Bitcoin traders' forum announcing that MT.Gox was going to start handling exchanges of Litecoins, a Bitcoin alternative. The post advertised a live chat on the topic at a link provided to mtgox-chat.info. That site, which used stolen code and style to masquerade as the legitimate MT.Gox site, then prompted victims to update their Java plugin and offered a forged Adobe updater.

The scam was first reported on reddit earlier this week, when a redditor reported spotting the fake site and its attempt to drop malware. While the attack was originally described by one of its victims as a "Java zero-day" exploit, it actually uses either a Java exploit or a fake Adobe updater to deliver its malware payload. That payload is DarkComet, a fairly common "remote administration tool" and keylogger. The attackers not only stole credentials for the victim's MT.Gox account, but they took other passwords as well.

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L3sPau1 writes "For five years, it hid in the weeds of networks used by Eastern European diplomats, government employees and scientific research organizations, stealing data and infecting more machines in an espionage campaign rivaling Flame and others of its ilk. The campaign, called Rocra or Red October by researchers at Kaspersky Lab, focused not only on workstations, but mobile devices and networking gear to gain a foothold inside strategic organizations. Once inside, attackers pivoted internally and stole everything from files on desktops, smartphones and FTP servers, to email databases using exploits developed in Chinese and Russian malware, Kaspersky researchers said."

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Please see the latest update (12/4) on this fast-moving story here: Fugitive Software Guru John McAfee Seeks ‘Asylum’ in Guatemala, Claims He’ll Be Killed in Belize Update 12/3 10:30 a.m. EST: In a posting on his website, John McAfee (or someone writing under his name) claims that the fugitive software pioneer has fled Belize and is now safely outside the country “in the company of two intrepid journalist[s] from Vice Magazine, and, of course, Sam.” (Sam is the young woman McAfee has been hiding out with.) McAfee claims to have dispatched a body double carrying a North Korean passport under his name, who was briefly detained in Mexico, before being released. “I left Belize because of a series of events which led both Sam and I to believe that she was in danger of capture,” McAfee writes. He also suggests, as he has in the past, that the entire episode is the result of his one-man crusade to battle corruption in Belize. I’ll update the story as more details become available. Three weeks ago, police in the small Central American country of Belize discovered U.S. software mogul John McAfee’s neighbor, 52-year old American businessman Gregory Faull, lying dead in a pool of blood with a 9-mm. bullet wound to the head. Just days earlier, authorities had been summoned to McAfee’s beachfront home after the eccentric software millionaire shot four of his own dogs, in order, he claimed, to put them out of their misery after they had been poisoned by unknown assailants. Belizean authorities insist they only want to question McAfee about the murder — he hasn’t been charged with a crime. But rather than submit to questioning, the 67-year-old McAfee freaked out and declared that he would be killed if taken into custody by Belizean authorities. That, apparently, is why McAfee has decided to lead Belizean authorities, not to mention the international press corps, on a rapidly escalating wild goose chase that keeps getting weirder by the day. Reached by phone, a spokesman for McAfee claimed not to know where his client was, but acknowledged that McAfee is on the run.

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If you're one of those people who tend to lose their phone shortly after putting it down, then you'll want to read this. According to a new study, if you lose your smartphone, you have a 50/50 chance of getting it back. But chances are much higher -- nearly 100 percent -- that whoever retrieves it will try to access your private information and apps.

According to a study by Symantec, 96 percent of people who picked up the lost phones tried to access personal or business data on the device. In 45 percent of cases, people tried to access the corporate email client on the device.

"This finding demonstrates the high risks posed by an unmanaged, lost smartphone to sensitive corporate information," according to the report. "It demonstrates the need for proper security policies and device/data management."

Symantec called the study the "Honey Stick Project." In this case the honey on a stick consisted of 50 smartphones that were intentionally left in New York, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., San Francisco and Ottowa, Canada. The phones were deposited in spots that were easy to see, and where it would be plausible for someone to forget them, including food courts and public restrooms.

None of the phones had security features, like passwords, to block access. Each was loaded with dummy apps and files that contained no real information, but which had names like "Social Networking" and "Corporate Email" that made it easy for the person who found it to understand what each app did. Each phone also was loaded with programs to track what finders did with the devices, and to send that information to the researchers.

Among people who found the phones, 72 percent tried to access photos, 57 percent tried to open a file called "Saved Passwords," and 43 percent tried to open an app called "Online Banking." Most of the apps on the phones were protected by passwords, but the username and password fields were already filled out, so that users could simply press a button to access them. Well over half of the people who discovered the phones, 66 percent, clicked those buttons to try and start the programs. The fact that the finders had to click a button to access the apps indicates that their attempts were likely intentional.

"This might be considered to be an unethical access attempt," according to the study. Also disturbing, only half the people who found the phones ever tried to contact the rightful owner, even though the owner's phone number and email address were prominently listed in the phones' contact lists. "This finding highlights the fact that in many cases, regaining possession of lost device may be a losing battle," according to the study.

If this sends shivers down your spine, here are some tips for how to protect yourself:

--Always protect your phone with a password or a "draw to unlock" pattern.

--Use security software designed specifically for smartphones to lock up programs on your phone. Some of these programs can be used to help locate the phone, or to wipe its memory from remote locations.

--Don't lose your cell phone. This falls under the category of "Well, duh." Nobody loses a smartphone on purpose, obviously. But try to make sure you keep it in you pocket or purse when not in use.

--Companies that issue phones to their employees should make sure to train workers on security, and should secure every phone with passwords.

This article originally appeared on Credit.com.

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New submitter Golgafrinchan passes along this quote from an article at Wired:
"A computer virus has infected the cockpits of America's Predator and Reaper drones, logging pilots' every keystroke as they remotely fly missions over Afghanistan and other warzones. The virus, first detected nearly two weeks ago by the military's Host-Based Security System, has not prevented pilots at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada from flying their missions overseas. Nor have there been any confirmed incidents of classified information being lost or sent to an outside source. But the virus has resisted multiple efforts to remove it from Creech's computers, network security specialists say. And the infection underscores the ongoing security risks in what has become the U.S. military's most important weapons system.'"

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