Skip navigation
Help

transportation

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
Yoshihiko Mano

It’s the nature of the beast that web design is always changing, and one of the many things that designers often lose sleep over is fonts.

Till recently web fonts were usually limited to ones installed on Windows or OSX, but these days you can choose a wide range of fonts available online. This means lots of choice for design but with more choice comes more woe. Which one to pick for which occasion?

Well, let’s put aside difficult decisions for a moment. We want to have a bit of fun with fonts! PingMag has scoured the plains of the world wide web for some funky Japanese fonts that are useful (okay, maybe not so useful!) — but always unique.

Fonts that are almost practical!

Imagine Yokohama fun-japanese-fonts01

This font was created to mark 150 years since Yokohama opened its port to the world and to remake the “Yokohama” brand. The designers researched the images that people associated with Yokohama, and then turned the character you could see in these into a font. The result is a harmony of classic and modern, and rather attractive too. You can write in Roman characters and Hiragana, but the Kanji is limited just to characters used in Yokohama ward names!

Yakitori Font fun-japanese-fonts02Photo by matsuyuki

fun-japanese-fonts03

This is recommended for all budding izakaya owners! You can almost taste the atmosphere just in the lettering. (Personal use okay. Apply for commercial use.)

Yoji Font

fun-japanese-fonts04

Perfect if you’re in need of some nostalgia. Do you remember how your handwriting looked when you were a young child (yoji)? Say three or four years old? Well, with this font adults can recreate that charmingly earnest look on their work documents! It’s Japanese only and, of course, there’s no Kanji. (Personal and commercial use okay.)

Fonts for sentimental train (and other forms of transportation) aficionados

National Rail-esque Font fun-japanese-fonts05Photo by tosimisi

fun-japanese-fonts06

So now you can turn any word into a railway station name! The font resembles the style of characters used in old (i.e. back when JR was still nationalized) railway signage. Actually, it’s not just for nostalgia. The font can also look super modern and smart as well. (Personal and commercial use okay.)

Handwritten Railway Type fun-japanese-fonts07

Okay, this one’s for the real train fanatics among you, recreating the handwritten station name signs as used on Japanese railway lines from a bygone age. The design quality is also still good enough for today. (Personal and commercial use okay.)

National Rail Font: Pictographs fun-japanese-fonts08

This time it’s not words but the pictographs used in stations. Saying that, we’re not totally sure what that onsen (hot spring) symbol is doing there… (Personal and commercial use okay. Requires device with Japanese language input.)

Highway Sign Font fun-japanese-fonts09Photo by Ryo Yamaguchi

fun-japanese-fonts10 If you’re more of a driver then check out this font that looks like lettering on the signs to be found on Japanese highways. Striking and easy to read (since you are in theory driving fast!), this is great for titles. (Personal use okay. Apply for commercial use.)

Ghosts in the digital age?! Yes, it’s horror fonts!

Onryo fun-japanese-fonts11

Do you sometimes want to give your text a scary or ghoulish look? Gothic type just doesn’t cut it, right? Well, you will find Onryo (which means “ghost” or “phantom” in Japanese) a very useful font for those days in the office when you need to cast spells and curses on your work enemies. (Personal use okay. Commercial use also okay but recommended to check with the designer.)

DingTheInsect fun-japanese-fonts12

No scary experience is complete without some creepy-crawlies. For such occasions, reach for this font, which might just send shivers up your spine as you type. (Personal use okay. Commercial use also okay but recommended to check with the designer.)

Pure unadulterated fun!

JoJo Font

fun-japanese-fonts13

For the uninitiated out there, this font is in the style of the cult manga ‘JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure’. Great for adding flourishes of onomatopoeia and the like, transforming dull text into exciting comic book scenes.

Neko Font fun-japanese-fonts14

Who cares about getting meaning across? If you’re crazy about cats (neko), then the felines are all that matter! This font isn’t available as data but you can type what you want on the website, and then get an automated code to display an downloadable image.

And there you have it for now, folks! The wealth of Japanese fonts available online is almost endless if you search around — and we’ve just scratched the surface with this quick intro. Happy hunting!

Okay, so please look out for future PingMag articles written entirely in cats.

0
Your rating: None

Claudio-guarnieri_large

Above: Claudio Guarnieri of IT security firm Rapid7

Italy's Hacking Team is like most any software company: worried about market demand, creating desirable features, and not being too buggy. But their product, called "DaVinci," is something no one ever wants to find on their computer.

"They sell software that helps people break into people's computers and spy on them," explains Morgan Marquis-Boire, a researcher with University of Toronto's Citizen Lab.

Hacking Team develops targeted malware for use by nation-states.

Continue reading…

0
Your rating: None


Confessions of a Cyber Spy Hunter: Eric Winsborrow at TEDxVancouver

Help us caption and translate this video on Amara.org: www.amara.org With over 20 years of experience leading high technology companies out of Silicon Valley, Eric has played a part in shaping the industry as an executive at heavyweights like McAfee, Symantec, and Cisco. Today, he is the CEO of ZanttZ, a company that is developing stealth cyber security technology solutions. Eric and his company are at the forefront of the latest developments in the world of global espionage, and the merging of man and machine. He attests that the Hollywood-created image of the daring secret agent sneaking into a foreign government's laser protected server room to steal top secret information couldn't be further from modern reality. In fact, the "James Bond" of the 21st century doesn't just use a computer, he is the computer. In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
From:
TEDxTalks
Views:
53

10
ratings
Time:
20:49
More in
Science & Technology

0
Your rating: None

datum380

Image copyright kentoh

In a series of articles last year, executives from the ad-data firms BlueKai, eXelate and Rocket Fuel debated whether the future of online advertising lies with “More Data” or “Better Algorithms.” Omar Tawakol of BlueKai argues that more data wins because you can drive more effective marketing by layering additional data onto an audience. While we agree with this, we can’t help feeling like we’re being presented with a false choice.

Maybe we should think about a solution that involves smaller amounts of higher quality data instead of more data or better algorithms.

First, it’s important to understand what data is feeding the marketing ecosystem and how it’s getting there. Most third-party profiles consist of data points inferred from the content you consume, forms you fill out and stuff you engage with online. Some companies match data from offline databases with your online identity, and others link your activity across devices. Lots of energy is spent putting trackers on every single touchpoint. And yet the result isn’t very accurate — we like to make jokes around the office about whether one of our colleagues’ profiles says they’re a man or a woman that day. Truth be told, on most days BlueKai thinks they are both.

One way to increase the quality of data would be to change where we get it from.

Instead of scraping as many touchpoints as possible, we could go straight to the source: The individual. Imagine the power of data from across an individual’s entire digital experience — from search to social to purchase, across devices. This kind of data will make all aspects of online advertising more efficient: True attribution, retargeting-type performance for audience targeting, purchase data, customized experiences.

So maybe the solution to “More Data” vs. “Better Algorithms” isn’t incremental improvements to either, but rather to invite consumers to the conversation and capture a fundamentally better data set. Getting this new type of data to the market won’t be easy. Four main hurdles need to be cleared for the market to reach scale.

Control and Comfort

When consumers say they want “privacy,” they don’t normally desire the insular nature of total anonymity. Rather, they want control over what is shared and with whom. Any solution will need to give consumers complete transparent control over their profiles. Comfort is gained when consumers become aware of the information that advertisers are interested in — in most cases, the data is extremely innocuous. A Recent PWC survey found that 80 percent of people are willing to share “information if a company asks up front and clearly states use.”

Remuneration

Control and Comfort are both necessary, but people really want to share in the value created by their data. Smart businesses will offer things like access to content, free shipping, coupons, interest rate discounts or even loyalty points to incentivize consumers to transact using data. It’s not much of a stretch to think that consumers who feel fairly compensated will upload even more data into the marketing cloud.

Trust and Transparency

True transparency around what data is gathered and what happens to it engenders trust. Individuals should have the final say about which of their data is sold. Businesses will need to adopt best practices and tools that allow the individual to see and understand what is happening with their data. A simple dashboard with delete functionality should do, for a start.

Ease of Use

This will all be moot if we make it hard for consumers to participate. Whatever system we ask them to adopt needs to be dead simple to use, and offer enough benefits for them to take the time and effort to switch. Here we can apply one of my favorite principles from Ruby on Rails — convention over configuration. There is so much value in data collected directly from individuals that we can build a system whose convention is to protect even the least sensitive of data points and still respect privacy, without requiring the complexity needed for configuration.

The companies who engage individuals around how their data is used and collected will have an unfair advantage over those who don’t. Their advertising will be more relevant, they’ll be able to customize experiences and measure impact to a level of precision impossible via third-party data. To top it off, by being open and honest with their consumers about data, they’ll have impacted that intangible quality that every brand strives for: Authenticity.

In the bigger picture, the advertising industry faces an exciting opportunity. By treating people and their data with respect and involving them in the conversation around how their data is used, we help other industries gain access to data by helping individuals feel good about transacting with it. From healthcare to education to transportation, society stands to gain if people see data as an opportunity and not a threat.

Marc is the co-founder and CEO of Enliken, a startup focused on helping businesses and consumers transact with data. Currently, it offers tools for publishers and readers to exchange data for access to content. Prior to Enliken, Marc was the founding CEO of Spongecell, an interactive advertising platform that produced one of the first ad units to run on biddable media.

0
Your rating: None

New submitter dasacc22 writes "Campbell is inviting developers to hack the kitchen with their recipe API. But wait — the API is private, so first you need to submit an idea. If they like the idea, you'll be given access to develop the app. If they like the app, they may give you some money. Otherwise, you can expect to have an app that connects to an API you no longer have access to. The author of this article covers his recent experiences after engaging with Campbell's Adam Kmiec to try and answer the following: '... my question to software developers out there who are thinking of devoting any real effort to a corporate hackathon like this is: "Why?"'"

Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

0
Your rating: None

ZBoard Sam Sheffer lead

I'm something of an electric skateboard veteran. Last year at CES I rode the Board of Awesomeness, an electric skateboard that uses a Kinect and a Windows 8 tablet to function. This year at CES I had the opportunity to ride the ZBoard; an electric skateboard that works like a Segway — leaning forward makes you accelerate, and leaning back slows you down. The ZBoard is yet another Kickstarter success we've seen here at CES 2013, and it blew my mind.

Continue reading…

0
Your rating: None


Whenever I see old abandoned boats, the first thing I try to imagine is its launching as a new boat. I always wonder how or why a boat that  just might have many stories to tell would just be left to rot. Still there is a certain beauty to weathered wooden boats long forgotten by their owners. Someday, sooner rather than later, somebody will build houses or a strip mall on this now vacant lot on the Outer Banks. I can just see this boat heading out for a day’s catch. Waves crashing over the bow. And men in yellow slickers, their eyes cast towards the open sea.

0
Your rating: None