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Original author: 
Wilson Page

  

When the mockups for the new Financial Times application hit our desks in mid-2012, we knew we had a real challenge on our hands. Many of us on the team (including me) swore that parts of interface would not be possible in HTML5. Given the product team’s passion for the new UI, we rolled up our sleeves and gave it our best shot.

We were tasked with implementing a far more challenging product, without compromising the reliable, performant experience that made the first app so successful.

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We didn’t just want to build a product that fulfilled its current requirements; we wanted to build a foundation that we could innovate on in the future. This meant building with a maintenance-first mentality, writing clean, well-commented code and, at the same time, ensuring that our code could accommodate the demands of an ever-changing feature set.

In this article, I’ll discuss some of the changes we made in the latest release and the decision-making behind them. I hope you will come away with some ideas and learn from our solutions as well as our mistakes.

Supported Devices

The first Financial Times Web app ran on iPad and iPhone in the browser, and it shipped in a native (PhoneGap-esque) application wrapper for Android and Windows 8 Metro devices. The latest Web app is currently being served to iPad devices only; but as support is built in and tested, it will be rolled out to all existing supported platforms. HTML5 gives developers the advantage of occupying almost any mobile platform. With 2013 promising the launch of several new Web application marketplaces (eg. Chrome Web Store and Mozilla Marketplace), we are excited by the possibilities that lie ahead for the mobile Web.

Fixed-Height Layouts

The first shock that came from the new mockups was that they were all fixed height. By “fixed height,” I mean that, unlike a conventional website, the height of the page is restricted to the height of the device’s viewport. If there is more content than there is screen space, overflow must be dealt with at a component level, as opposed to the page level. We wanted to use JavaScript only as a last resort, so the first tool that sprang to mind was flexbox. Flexbox gives developers the ability to declare flexible elements that can fill the available horizontal or vertical space, something that has been very tricky to do with CSS. Chris Coyier has a great introduction to flexbox.

Using Flexbox in Production

Flexbox has been around since 2009 and has great support on all the popular smartphones and tablets. We jumped at the chance to use flexbox when we found out how easily it could solve some of our complex layouts, and we started throwing it at every layout problem we faced. As the app began to grow, we found performance was getting worse and worse.

We spent a good few hours in Chrome Developers Tools’ timeline and found the culprit: Shock, horror! — it was our new best friend, flexbox. The timeline showed that some layouts were taking close to 100 milliseconds; reworking our layouts without flexbox reduced this to 10 milliseconds! This may not seem like a lot, but when swiping between sections, 90 milliseconds of unresponsiveness is very noticeable.

Back to the Old School

We had no other choice but to tear out flexbox wherever we could. We used 100% height, floats, negative margins, border-box sizing and padding to achieve the same layouts with much greater performance (albeit with more complex CSS). Flexbox is still used in some parts of the app. We found that its impact on performance was less expensive when used for small UI components.

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Page layout time with flexbox

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Page layout time without flexbox

Truncation

The content of a fixed-height layout will rarely fit its container; eventually it has to overflow. Traditionally in print, designers have used ellipses (three dots) to solve this problem; however, on the Web, this isn’t the simplest technique to implement.

Ellipsis

You might be familiar with the text-overflow: ellipsis declaration in CSS. It works great, has awesome browser support, but has one shortfall: it can’t be used for text that spans multiple lines. We needed a solution that would insert an ellipsis at the point where the paragraph overflows its container. JavaScript had to step in.

ellipsis-500_mini
Ellipsis truncation is used throughout.

After an in-depth research and exploration of several different approaches, we created our FTEllipsis library. In essence, it measures the available height of the container, then measures the height of each child element. When it finds the child element that overflows the container, it caps its height to a sensible number of lines. For WebKit-based browsers, we use the little-known -webkit-line-clamp property to truncate an element’s text by a set number of lines. For non-WebKit browsers, the library allows the developer to style the overflowing container however they wish using regular CSS.

Modularization

Having tackled some of the low-level visual challenges, we needed to step back and decide on the best way to manage our application’s views. We wanted to be able to reuse small parts of our views in different contexts and find a way to architect rock-solid styling that wouldn’t leak between components.

One of the best decisions we made in implementing the new application was to modularize the views. This started when we were first looking over the designs. We scribbled over printouts, breaking the page down into chunks (or modules). Our plan was to identify all of the possible layouts and modules, and define each view (or page) as a combination of modules sitting inside the slots of a single layout.

Each module needed to be named, but we found it very hard to describe a module, especially when some modules could have multiple appearances depending on screen size or context. As a result, we abandoned semantic naming and decided to name each component after a type of fruit — no more time wasted thinking up sensible, unambiguous names!

An example of a module’s markup:


<div class="apple">
  <h2 class="apple_headline">{{headline}}</h2>
  <h3 class="apple_sub-head">{{subhead}}</h3>
  <div class="apple_body">{{body}}</div>
</div>

An example of a module’s styling:


.apple {}

.apple_headline {
  font-size: 40px;
}

.apple_sub-head {
  font-size: 20px;
}

.apple_body {
  font-size: 14px;
  column-count: 2;
  color: #333;
}

Notice how each class is prefixed with the module’s name. This ensures that the styling for one component will never affect another; every module’s styling is encapsulated. Also, notice how we use just one class in our CSS selectors; this makes our component transportable. Ridding selectors of any ancestral context means that modules may be dropped anywhere in our application and will look the same. This is all imperative if we want to be able to reuse components throughout the application (and even across applications).

What If a Module Needs Interactions?

Each module (or fruit) has its own markup and style, which we wrote in such a way that it can be reused. But what if we need a module to respond to interactions or events? We need a way to bring the component to life, but still ensure that it is unbound from context so that it can be reused in different places. This is a little trickier that just writing smart markup and styling. To solve this problem, we wrote FruitMachine.

Reusable Components

FruitMachine is a lightweight library that assembles our layout’s components and enables us to declare interactions on a per-module basis. It was inspired by the simplicity of Backbone views, but with a little more structure to keep “boilerplate” code to a minimum. FruitMachine gives our team a consistent way to work with views, while at the same time remaining relatively unopinionated so that it can be used in almost any view.

The Component Mentality

Thinking about your application as a collection of standalone components changes the way you approach problems. Components need to be dumb; they can’t know anything of their context or of the consequences of any interactions that may occur within them. They can have a public API and should emit events when they are interacted with. An application-specific controller assembles each layout and is the brain behind everything. Its job is to create, control and listen to each component in the view.

For example, to show a popover when a component named “button” is clicked, we would not hardcode this logic into the button component. Instead “button” would emit a buttonclicked event on itself every time its button is clicked; the view controller would listen for this event and then show the popover. By working like this, we can create a large collection of components that can be reused in many different contexts. A view component may not have any application-specific dependencies if it is to be used across projects.

Working like this has simplified our architecture considerably. Breaking down our views into components and decoupling them from our application focuses our decision-making and moves us away from baking complex, heavily dependent modules into our application.

The Future of FruitMachine

FruitMachine was our solution to achieve fully transportable view components. It enables us to quickly define and assemble views with minimal effort. We are currently using FruitMachine only on the client, but server-side (NodeJS) usage has been considered throughout development. In the coming months, we hope to move towards producing server-side-rendered websites that progressively enhance into a rich app experience.

You can find out more about FruitMachine and check out some more examples in the public GitHub repository.

Retina Support

The Financial Times’ first Web app was released before the age of “Retina” screens. We retrofitted some high-resolution solutions, but never went the whole hog. For our designers, 100% Retina support was a must-have in the new application. We developers were sick of maintaining multiple sizes and resolutions of each tiny image within the UI, so a single vector-based solution seemed like the best approach. We ended up choosing icon fonts to replace our old PNGs, and because they are implemented just like any other custom font, they are really well supported. SVG graphics were considered, but after finding a lack of support in Android 2.3 and below, this option was ruled out. Plus, there is something nice about having all of your icons bundled up in a single file, whilst not sacrificing the individuality of each graphic (like sprites).

Our first move was to replace the Financial Times’ logo image with a single glyph in our own custom icon font. A font glyph may be any color and size, and it always looks super-sharp and is usually lighter in weight than the original image. Once we had proved it could work, we began replacing every UI image and icon with an icon font alternative. Now, the only pixel-based image in our CSS is the full-color logo on the splash screen. We used the powerful but rather archaic-looking FontForge to achieve this.

Once past the installation phase, you can open any font file in FontForge and individually change the vector shape of any character. We imported SVG vector shapes (created in Adobe Illustrator) into suitable character slots of our font and exported as WOFF and TTF font types. A combination of WOFF and TTF file formats are required to support iOS, Android and Windows devices, although we hope to rely only on WOFFs once Android gains support (plus, WOFFs are around 25% smaller in file size than TTFs).

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The Financial Times’ icon font in Font Forge

Images

Article images are crucial for user engagement. Our images are delivered as double-resolution JPEGs so that they look sharp on Retina screens. Our image service (running ImageMagick) outputs JPEGs at the lowest possible quality level without causing noticeable degradation (we use 35 for Retina devices and 70 for non-Retina). Scaling down retina size images in the browser enables us to reduce JPEG quality to a lower level than would otherwise be possible without compression artifacts becoming noticeable. This article explains this technique in more detail.

It’s worth noting that this technique does require the browser to work a little harder. In old browsers, the work of scaling down many large images could have a noticeable impact on performance, but we haven’t encountered any serious problems.

Native-Like Scrolling

Like almost any application, we require full-page and subcomponent scrolling in order to manage all of the content we want to show our users. On desktop, we can make use of the well-established overflow CSS property. When dealing with the mobile Web, this isn’t so straightforward. We require a single solution that provides a “momentum” scrolling experience across all of the devices we support.

overflow: scroll

The overflow: scroll declaration is becoming usable on the mobile Web. Android and iOS now support it, but only since Android 3.0 and iOS 5. IOS 5 came with the exciting new -webkit-overflow-scrolling: touch property, which allows for native momentum-like scrolling in the browser. Both of these options have their limitations.

Standard overflow: scroll and overflow: auto don’t display scroll bars as users might expect, and they don’t have the momentum touch-scrolling feel that users have become accustomed to from their native apps. The -webkit-overflow-scrolling: touch declaration does add momentum scrolling and scroll bars, but it doesn’t allow developers to style the scroll bars in any way, and has limited support (iOS 5+ and Chrome on Android).

A Consistent Experience

Fragmented support and an inconsistent feel forced us to turn to JavaScript. Our first implementation used the TouchScroll library. This solution met our needs, but as our list of supported devices grew and as more complex scrolling interactions were required, working with it became trickier. TouchScroll lacks IE 10 support, and its API interface is difficult to work with. We also tried Scrollability and Zynga Scroller, neither of which have the features, performance or cross-browser capability we were looking for. Out of this problem, FTScroller was developed: a high-performance, momentum-scrolling library with support for iOS, Android, Playbook and IE 10.

FTScroller

FTScroller’s scrolling implementation is similar to TouchScroll’s, with a flexible API much like Zynga Scroller. We added some enhancements, such as CSS bezier curves for bouncing, requestAnimationFrame for smoother frame rates, and support for IE 10. The advantage of writing our own solution is that we could develop a product that exactly meets our requirements. When you know the code base inside out, fixing bugs and adding features is a lot simpler.

FTScroller is dead simple to use. Just pass in the element that will wrap the overflowing content, and FTScroller will implement horizontal or vertical scrolling as and when needed. Many other options may be declared in an object as the second argument, for more custom requirements. We use FTScroller throughout the Financial Times’ Web app for a consistent cross-platform scrolling experience.

A simple example:


var container = document.getElementById('scrollcontainer');
var scroller = new FTScroller(container);

The Gallery

The part of our application that holds and animates the page views is known as the “gallery.” It consists of three divisions: left, center and right. The page that is currently in view is located in the center pane. The previous page is positioned off screen in the left-hand pane, and the next page is positioned off screen in the right-hand pane. When the user swipes to the next page, we use CSS transitions to animate the three panes to the left, revealing the hidden right pane. When the transition has finished, the right pane becomes the center pane, and the far-left pane skips over to become the right pane. By using only three page containers, we keep the DOM light, while still creating the illusion of infinite pages.

Web
Infinite scrolling made possible with a three-pane gallery

Making It All Work Offline

Not many Web apps currently offer an offline experience, and there’s a good reason for that: implementing it is a bloody pain! The application cache (AppCache) at first glance appears to be the answer to all offline problems, but dig a little deeper and stuff gets nasty. Talks by Andrew Betts and Jake Archibald explain really well the problems you will encounter. Unfortunately, AppCache is currently the only way to achieve offline support, so we have to work around its many deficiencies.

Our approach to offline is to store as little in the AppCache as possible. We use it for fonts, the favicon and one or two UI images — things that we know will rarely or never need updating. Our JavaScript, CSS and templates live in LocalStorage. This approach gives us complete control over serving and updating the most crucial parts of our application. When the application starts, the bare minimum required to get the app up and running is sent down the wire, embedded in a single HTML page; we call this the preload.

We show a splash screen, and behind the scenes we make a request for the application’s full resources. This request returns a big JSON object containing our JavaScript, CSS and Mustache templates. We eval the JavaScript and inject the CSS into the DOM, and then the application launches. This “bootstrap” JSON is then stored in LocalStorage, ready to be used when the app is next started up.

On subsequent startups, we always use the JSON from LocalStorage and then check for resource updates in the background. If an update is found, we download the latest JSON object and replace the existing one in LocalStorage. Then, the next time the app starts, it launches with the new assets. If the app is launched offline, the startup process is the same, except that we cannot make the request for resource updates.

Images

Managing offline images is currently not as easy as it should be. Our image requests are run through a custom image loader and cached in the local database (IndexedDB or WebSQL) so that the images can be loaded when a network connection is not present. We never load images in the conventional way, otherwise they would break when users are offline.

Our image-loading process:

  1. The loader scans the page for image placeholders declared by a particular class.
  2. It takes the src attribute of each image placeholder found and requests the source from our JavaScript image-loader library.
  3. The local database is checked for each image. Failing that, a single HTTP request is made listing all missing images.
  4. A JSON array of Base64-encoded images is returned from the HTTP response and stored separately in the local database.
  5. A callback is fired for each image request, passing the Base64 string as an argument.
  6. An <img> element is created, and its src attribute is set to the Base64 data-URI string.
  7. The image is faded in.

I should also mention that we compress our Base64-encoded image strings in order to fit as many images in the database as possible. My colleague Andrew Betts goes into detail on how this can be achieved.

In some cases, we use this cool trick to handle images that fail to load:


<img src="image.jpg" onerror="this.style.display='none';" />

Ever-Evolving Applications

In order to stay competitive, a digital product needs to evolve, and as developers, we need to be prepared for this. When the request for a redesign landed at the Financial Times, we already had a fast, popular, feature-rich application, but it wasn’t built for change. At the time, we were able to implement small changes to features, but implementing anything big became a slow process and often introduced a lot of unrelated regressions.

Our application was drastically reworked to make the new requirements possible, and this took a lot of time. Having made this investment, we hope the new application not only meets (and even exceeds) the standard of the first product, but gives us a platform on which we can develop faster and more flexibly in the future.

(al)

© Wilson Page for Smashing Magazine, 2013.

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Glass is a web app

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Many of us care deeply about developing our craft. But staying up to date can be a true challenge, because the quantity of fresh information we’re regularly exposed to can be a lot to take in. 2012 has been no exception, with a wealth of evolution and refinement going on in the front end.

Great strides have been made in how we approach workflow, use abstractions, appreciate code quality and tackle the measurement and betterment of performance. If you’ve been busy and haven’t had time to catch up on the latest developments in these areas, don’t worry.

With the holiday season upon us and a little more time on our hands, I thought it would be useful to share a carefully curated list of the most relevant front-end talks I’ve found helpful this year. You certainly don’t have to read through them all, but the advice shared in them will equip you with the knowledge needed to go into the new year as a better front-end engineer.

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Image credit: Jacob Bøtter

Baseline

Have a Strategy for Staying Up to Date

How to Stay Up to Date on Web Stuff, Chris Coyier

Part of continually developing your craft is staying up to date. Doing this is important for all professionals, and in this talk you’ll learn strategies for staying updated even when the ideas that surround the technologies we use are constantly evolving.

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Make Sure Your Baseline for Development Is Current

A New Baseline for Front-End Developers, Rebecca Murphey

There was a time when editing files, testing them locally and simply FTP’ing them was the common workflow for a front-end developer. We would measure our abilities based on how well we could harass IE 6 into rendering pages correctly, and we generally lacked strong skills in HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

This has greatly changed over the past few years, with improvements in workflow and tooling. Front-end development is now taken more seriously, and this talk sheds light on the new baseline process for developing on the front end.

Screenshot

Understand How Browsers Work Behind the Scenes

So, You Want to Be a Front-End Engineer, David Mosher (Video)

Some would say that the browser is the most volatile development platform the world has ever known. If you’re a client-side developer, understanding how browser internals work can help you both make better decisions and appreciate the justifications behind many development best practices. In one of the best talks this year, David Mosher takes you through how browsers parse and render your pages.

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Know What the Web Platform Now Has to Offer

The Web Can Do That!?, Eric Bidelman (Video)

The Web is constantly evolving, and keeping up with what’s new on the platform can be hard. HTML5’s new capabilities enable us to build an entirely new suite of applications with features that were simply impossible to achieve before (at least, not without the use of plugins) but are now a reality.

In this talk, my teammate Eric guides you through the bleeding edge of HTML5, focusing on solving many real-world problems. You’ll learn about media streaming, device input, modern CSS design, media capture, file I/O and more.

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Workflow

For Web App Developers

Tooling for the Modern Web App Developer, Addy Osmani

Whether you’re using JavaScript or CoffeeScript, LESS or Sass, building an awesome Web application these days usually requires a plethora of boilerplates, frameworks and tools and a lot of glue to get them to work together. In short, you need a kick-ass utility belt.

In this talk, you’ll get an overview of the current tooling eco-system for the front-end and learn about a new tool that tries to bring together all of the pieces of this eco-system for you, called Yeoman.

Screenshot

An extended version of this talk is also available.

For Web Designers

A Modern Web Designer’s Workflow, Chris Coyier (Video)

A lot is expected from today’s Web designers. If this role defines what you do, then it’s now not just about visual design, but increasingly about building interactions. Designs need to work across different devices of varying shapes, sizes and connections, and they also need to be accessible.

As a designer, you often need to communicate and share code across teams and be familiar with many different technologies. In this talk, Chris Coyier discusses many of the amazing tools that can help things along, discussing what does what and giving a high-level view of a modern workflow.

Screenshot

For Mobile Web Developers

Mobile Web Developers Toolbelt, Pete Le Page (Video)

Building for the mobile Web requires a different mindset to the one we use when developing for desktop, and a different set of tools. Thankfully, a number of great options are available. From remote debugging to emulation, mobile browsers are offering more and more tools to make our lives easier.

In this talk, Pete Le Page takes you through a couple of tools that you can use today to make cross-platform mobile Web development easier, and then he peers into the crystal ball to see what tools the future may bring.

Screenshot

For Debugging

Secrets of the Chrome DevTools, Patrick Dubroy (Video)

Google Chrome Developer Tools provide powerful ways to understand, debug and profile Web applications. Most developers are familiar with Chrome’s basic inspection and debugging tools, but some of its most valuable features, like the Timeline and memory analysis tools, are less known.

In his demo-based walkthrough, Patrick Dubroy provides an overview of Chrome Developer Tools and an in-depth demonstration of some lesser-known features.

Screenshot

The Future

CSS

The CSS of Tomorrow, Peter Gasston

In this talk, Peter looks briefly at the state of CSS3: what you can do right now, and what you’ll be able to do in the very near future. He then looks into the long-term future, to a time when CSS3 will make possible page layouts far richer and more dynamic than we’d thought possible, and when CSS3 has taken on aspects of programming languages. This is effectively what CSS developers will be learning years from now.

Screenshot

JavaScript

The Future of JavaScript, Dave Herman

The Web platform is growing, and JavaScript is growing along with it. EcmaScript 6, the next edition of the JavaScript standard, is gearing up to be a huge step forward for Web programming. In this talk, Dave Herman discusses the exciting new features being worked on for EcmaScript 6 and how they can be used.

Screenshot

Web Applications

Web Components and the Future of Web App Development, Eric Bidelman

Web components are going to fundamentally change the way we think, build and consume Web apps. ShadowDOM, Mutation Observers, custom elements, MDV, Object.observe(), CSS — how do they all fit together?

This talk prepares you for the future of the Web platform by discussing the fundamentals of Web components and how we can use them today with frameworks such as AngularJS.

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CSS

State of the Art

All the New CSS Hawtness, Darcy Clarke

This talk dives into some of the latest CSS implementations and specifications floating around. You’ll learn what’s here and what’s around the corner, and you’ll gain insight into why these new features will change our development workflow.

Darcy Clarke touches on modules such as paged-media, multi-columns, flex-box, filters, regions, box-sizing, masking and 3D.

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Modularity

Your CSS Is a Mess, Jonathan Snook

We all think that CSS is easy. Take some selectors, add some properties, maybe a dash of media queries, and — presto! — you have a beautiful website. And yet, as the project changes and the team grows, we see the frustration build, with increasingly complex selectors and overuse of !important.

In this talk, Jonathan looks at common problems and solutions that will make your CSS (and your projects) easier to manage and easier to scale.

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Pre-Processors

CSS Pre-Processors, Bermon Painter

If you haven’t jumped on the pre-processor train this year, you’re missing out. In this helpful overview of (current) popular pre-processors, Bermon Painter takes you through Stylus, LESS and Sass, with features subdivided into easy-to-learn sections of beginner, intermediate and advanced. I’ve been using mixins quite heavily this year, and I simply wouldn’t have been able to if it weren’t for projects like Sass.

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Documentation

A Better Future With KSS, Kyle Neath

Writing maintainable CSS within a team is one of those problems that a lot of people think can be solved by writing CSS in a particular style. But in Kyle’s experience, that never works out.

In this talk, he introduces you to his latest creation, KSS. It’s a documentation and style guide format. He’ll show you why he built KSS and how it’s been helping him at GitHub to refactor its four-and-a-half year old CSS, and he’ll give you a glimpse into the future of KSS.

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JavaScript

The Importance of Code Style

Maintainable JavaScript, Nicholas Zakas

Some say that good code is its own documentation, and the fact is that the more readable our code is, the easier it is to maintain.

Writing JavaScript for fun and writing it professionally are two different things, and in this talk by Zakas, you’ll learn practices to make JavaScript maintainable over the long run, to reduce errors and to make your code easily adaptable to future changes. It’s highly recommended reading.

Screenshot

A Modern Large-Scale App Stack

SoundCloud’s Stack, Nick Fisher

I’ve talked a lot about large-scale development in the past. It’s a non-trivial problem that’s difficult to get right, and so it’s exciting when someone working on such challenges shares their experience.

In this talk, Nick Fisher of SoundCloud discusses the company’s story of developing large-scale applications with JavaScript, not only at runtime, but also its steps to make development and deployment easier. In particular, he looks at RequireJS and Backbone, talking about how SoundCloud has used and abused each to suit its needs, sometimes in uncommon ways.

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Rethinking Application Structure

Re-Imagining the Browser With AngularJS, Igor Minar

What if you could a write modern Web app with dramatically fewer lines of code and improve its readability and expressiveness at the same time? In case you’re wondering: no, there’s no new language to learn, just familiar old HTML and JavaScript. As a matter of fact, there are concepts for you to unlearn.

AngularJS is a client-side JavaScript Web development framework whose authors believe they’ve done something special. Instead of asking what kind of functions they could provide to make writing apps smoother, they asked, “What if the browser worked differently in a way that eliminates code and gives structure to apps?”

In this talk, you’ll get a tour of how to get the power of tomorrow’s Web platform in today’s Web applications.

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Internationalization and i18n

Entschuldigen you, parlez vouz JavaScript, Sebastian Golasch (Video)

While JavaScript applications grow in size and complexity, there are still some white spots on the big map of Web applications: internationalization and globalization! If you´re still thinking that switching strings in and out is the way to go, you are definitely headed in the wrong direction.

In this talk, Sebastian takes you through how to spot real-world internationalization problems and how to solve them in the most elegant way.

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I couldn’t cover internationalization without mentioning Alex Sexton, who has also spoken a great deal on this topic. His JSConf talk on client-side internationalization is available in video form if you’re interested in checking it out.

Patterns and Principles

The Plight of Pinocchio, Brandon Keepers

JavaScript is no longer a toy language, and many of our Web applications can’t function without it. Brandon states that if we are going to use JavaScript to do real things, then we need to treat it like a real language, adopting the same practices that we use with real languages. I completely agree with him.

This framework-agnostic talk takes a serious look at how we develop JavaScript applications in the real world. Despite their prototypical nature, good object-oriented programming principles are still relevant. The design patterns that we’ve grown to know and love work just as well in JavaScript as they do in any other language.

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When to Lazy Load Scripts

How Late Is Later?, Massimiliano Marcon

Reducing the loading time of a Web application is a well-known challenge. Developers need to make sure that the browser downloads only the code that is strictly necessary to bootstrap the application, and leave the rest for later. This is what we commonly call “lazy loading.”

But when is “later”? When is the right time to lazy load? This talk shows how JavaScript code — functions and objects — can be delivered to the browser on demand, thus reducing the perceived loading time of a Web application.

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Mobile

Building Touch-Based Interfaces

Creating Responsive HTML5 Touch Interfaces, Stephen Woods (Video | Audio)

Flickr front-end engineer Stephen Woods shares some hard-learned lessons about building responsive touch-based interfaces using HTML5 and CSS. Because our users are demanding better instant feedback from touch-based UIs, understanding how to approach this problem and avoid the pitfalls will be critical for many application developers in the future.

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The Challenge With Scrolling

Embracing Touch: Cross-Platform Scrolling, Mark Dalgleish (Video)

Scrolling effects are a popular way to add personality to the simple act of moving down the page. Unfortunately, these effects don’t work natively on mobile devices, where the touch interaction would make these techniques more effective. In this talk, Mark looks at some ways to implement these effects within the limitations of mobile browsers.

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Native, HTML5 and Hybrid Apps

Native, HTML5 and Hybrid Mobile Development, Eran Zinman

One of the toughest decisions every mobile developer faces is choosing a development strategy: “Should I develop a native, HTML5 or hybrid mobile app?” Over the past two years, Eran has led Conduit’s mobile client development efforts, experimenting with cross-platform development in various flavors: from complete HTML5 solutions (using PhoneGap and other technologies) to hybrid solutions to semi-hybrid solutions to fully native solutions.

In this talk, Eran shares some real-life experiences in cross-platform development, describing changes that Conduit has implemented along the way, and sharing what some of the “big players” (such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter) are doing in their mobile app development.

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Performance, Distribution and Facebook on HTML5

On the Future of Mobile Web Apps, Simon Cross

Simon looks at Facebook’s experience with and investment in the mobile Web, the issues affecting mobile Web developers and what Facebook and the industry are doing to push the mobile Web forward. Mark Zuckerberg’s comments on HTML5 were undoubtedly one of the most discussed topics in mobile this year, and I personally found these slides a good summary of Facebook’s current take on what works and what still requires improvement.

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Tools for Mobile Debugging

Mobile Debugging, Remy Sharp

Debugging Web apps on mobile devices can be a genuine pain. Luckily, a number of tools are available today to ease the process. From remote debuggers to cross-device consoles, this talk summarizes the current state of debugging for mobile, going into more depth on debugging than Pete’s talk from earlier in the post.

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Responsive Design Techniques

Responsive Web Design: Clever Tips and Techniques, Vitaly Friedman

Responsive Web design challenges designers to apply a new mindset to their design processes and to the techniques they use in design and coding. This talk (by Smashing Magazine’s own Vitaly Friedman) provides an overview of various practical techniques, tips and tricks that you might want to be aware of when working on a new responsive design project.

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Web Apps

Offline Web Apps

Offline Rules, Andrew Betts (Video)

In the last couple of years, a deluge of new offline storage technologies have appeared. In this talk, Andrew looks at why they are all excellent and rubbish at the same time and why you need to use all of them, and he walks through techniques to consider when building a Web application that can load and function with no network connectivity.

But making use of client-side storage is necessary not only in order to make an app that works offline, but it can also hugely improve the experience of your website when the user actually does have connectivity.

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State of the Art

Building Web Apps of the Future: Tomorrow, Today and Yesterday, Paul Kinlan (Audio)

The browser is an amazing runtime that can already deliver amazing apps. Paul dives into the technologies that will help you deliver Web apps that will blow your users’ socks off now and in the future.

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Client-Side Storage

Storage in the Browser, Andrew Betts

Installed native applications can use all the space they want, but in the browser we’re much more limited. This talk explores how to make the best use of the storage technologies available to Web apps, comparing the virtues of different packaging and encoding techniques, and covering simple forms of in-browser compression that can yield surprising results.

As more apps are developed to surf over network turbulence, and to work even when completely disconnected from the network, local storage becomes ever more important.

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Application Cache

Application Cache: Douchebag, Jake Archibald (Video)

The Application Cache is one of the cool bits of HTML5. It allows websites to work without a network connection, and it brings us much closer to native app-like behavior. However, from roundup articles and talks about HTML5, you might be left with the impression that it’s a magic bullet. Unfortunately, it isn’t; the Application Cache is, as Jake famously puts it, a douchebag.

In this talk, he looks at how to use the features of Application Cache without the horrible side effects, comparing techniques that you’d use for both a simple client-side app and a large content-driven website. He explores the many gotchas left out of most articles about Application Cache and discusses how to build your website to survive them.

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Performance

CSS

High-Performance CSS, Paul Irish

Paul dives into the tools available in and outside of the browser to assess the performance of your CSS. Find out what’s slow (is box-shadow causing paints to be 70 milliseconds longer?) and how to fix it. Learn about about:tracing, CSS profiling and speed tracer, and get a better understanding of the browser’s internals in the process.

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There’s also Jon Rohan’s talk about some problems related to CSS performance that were solved at GitHub. Recommended reading.

GitHub’s CSS Performance, Jon Rohan

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Avoiding Jank

Jank-Free: In Pursuit of Smooth Web Apps, Tom Wiltzius

Building beautiful experiences on the mobile Web takes more than a good designer and fancy CSS: performance is critical for a Web app to feel fluid. Smooth animation that never drops a frame can give your app a native feel. But when animations stutter, effects lag or pages scroll slowly, we call that “jank.” This talk is about identifying jank and getting rid of it.

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Web

Building Faster Websites, Ilya Grigorik

In this comprehensive crash course, Ilya Grigorik shares some really juicy tips on how to make the Web faster, including Google’s findings on what slows down people’s Web experience and how Chrome and other services have improved it. If you’re an engineer looking to improve the performance of your websites or apps, this talk comes highly recommended.

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JavaScript

Breaking the JavaScript Speed Limit With V8, Daniel Clifford

Are you interested in making JavaScript run blazingly fast? If so, this talk looks at V8 under the hood to help you identify how to optimize your JavaScript. Daniel shows you how to leverage V8’s sampling profiler to eliminate performance bottlenecks and optimize JavaScript programs. He also exposes how V8 uses hidden classes and runtime-type feedback to generate efficient JIT code. A very interesting talk for performance junkies.

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Note: Some of the optimizations mentioned in this talk are specific to V8 and may not apply to other JavaScript engines. I wrote about how to write memory-efficient JavaScript on Smashing Magazine recently, in case you’re interested in exploring the topic further.

Testing

Understanding Code Smells

Why Our Code Smells, Brandon Keepers (Video)

Odors exist for a reason, and they are usually trying to tell us something. If our code smells, it might be trying to tell us what is wrong.

Does a test case require an abundance of setting up? Maybe the code being tested is doing too much, or it is not isolated enough for the test? Does an object have an abundance of instance variables? Maybe it should be split into multiple objects? Is a view brittle? Maybe it is too tightly coupled to a model, or maybe the logic needs to be abstracted into an object that can be tested?

In this talk, Brandon walks through code from projects that he works on every day, looking for smells that indicate problems, understanding why the smells are there, what the smells are trying to tell us, and how to refactor them.

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Current State of the Art

JavaScript Testing: The Holy Grail, Adam Hawkins (Video)

Adam talks about this Holy Grail for JavaScript developers: getting a test suite up and running fast and having multiple browsers execute the tests. Getting the Holy Grail is difficult, though, even though several tools have been created in the past in attempts to solve this problem.

Barriers to entries are everywhere. How easy is it to get going testing small parts of JavaScript functionality? What happens as your become bigger and more complex? What about headless testing? Does this process scale up to CI? Can you even do this stuff locally?

A myriad of testing tools and solutions are available, and Adam shows what’s out there and what we as a community need to do next to get the Holy Grail, to ensure a better Web experience for everyone.

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Tip: One tool for testing that I’m loving at the moment is Testling-CI, which runs browser tests on every push.

Improving the Testability of Your Code

Writing Testable JavaScript, Rebecca Murphey (Audio)

It’s one thing to write the code that you need to write to get something working; quite another to write the code that you need to write to prove that it works — and to prove that it will continue to work as you refactor and add new features.

In her talk, Rebecca looks at what it means to write testable JavaScript code.

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Conclusion

Time spent thinking about (and developing) your craft is time well spent. The more honed your skills are, the more opportunity you will have to become an efficient engineer.

While this list doesn’t cover every excellent talk presented this year, it hopefully offers some direction for you to accentuate your skills. Do consider reading through a few of them. Focused reading in this way will add to your value as a craftsperson and hopefully improve your daily development workflow.

With that, do enjoy the holiday season and have a fantastic new year.

(al)

© Addy Osmani for Smashing Magazine, 2012.

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