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Kadir van Lohuizen

Vía PanAm

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In 2011, Kadir started a visual investigation on migration in the Americas.

In 12 months, he traveled along the Pan-American Highway from Terra del Fuego in Patagonia to Deadhorse in Northern Alaska.
Vía PanAm is a unique social documentary MULTI MEDIA project made into an iApp for the iPad.

 

Bio

Before Kadir van Lohuizen (The Netherlands, 1963) became a photographer, he was a sailor and started a shelter for homeless and drug addicts in Holland. He was also an activist in the Dutch squatter movement.

He started to work as a professional freelance photojournalist in 1988 covering the Intifada. In the years following, he worked in many conflict areas in Africa, such as Angola, Sierra Leone, Mozambique, Liberia and the DR of Congo. From 1990 to 1994 he covered the transition in South Africa from apartheid to democracy.

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Kadir covered social issues in different corners of the former empire. He also went to North Korea and Mongolia. In 1997 he embarked on a big project to travel along the seven rivers of the world, from source to mouth, covering daily life along these lifelines. The project resulted in the book “Rivers” and “Aderen” (Mets & Schilt).

In 2000 and 2002 Kadir was a jury member of the World Press Photo contest.

In 2004 he went back to Angola, Sierra Leone and the DR of Congo to portray the diamond industry, following the diamonds from the mines to the consumer markets in the Western world. The exhibitions that resulted from this project were not only shown in Europe and the USA, but also in the mining areas of Congo, Angola and Sierra Leone. The photo book “Diamond Matters, the diamond industry” was published by Mets & Schilt (Holland), Dewi Lewis (UK) and Umbrage editions (USA) and awarded with the prestigious Dutch Dick Scherpenzeel Prize for best reporting on the developing world and a World Press Photo Award.

In that same year, Kadir initiated a photo project together with Stanley Greene and six other photographers on the issue of violence against women in the world.

In 2006 he launched a magazine called Katrina – An Unnatural Disaster, The Issue # 1, in collaboration with Stanley Greene, Thomas Dworzak and Paolo Pellegrin with an essay by Jon Lee Anderson.

After hurricane Katrina destroyed New Orleans, he has made several trips to the USA to document the aftermath of the storm. In the summer of 2010, to mark the fifth commemoration of Hurricane Katrina, Kadir exhibited images of Katrina’s devastation and the aftermath in a truck-exhibition that drove from Houston to New Orleans, a project in collaboration with Stanley Greene.

Kadir is a frequent lecturer and photography teacher; he’s a member and co-founder of NOOR picture agency and foundation and is based in Amsterdam.

 

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