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New Yorkers remember the victims of Sept. 11, plus a community mourns a high school basketball star and Union Square gets a new sculpture. A look at the week’s best images from around Greater New York.


Police officers from the United Kingdom marched in formation across the Brooklyn Bridge on Sunday, Sept. 11. The group walked from downtown Brooklyn for the memorial ceremony at Ground Zero. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)


Children and young adults took part in a citizenship ceremony at Citi Field before the Mets game on Wednesday. (Mustafah Abdulaziz for The Wall Street Journal)


A 37-year-old Verizon worker was electrocuted Wednesday morning in Brooklyn as he worked on lines connected to a utility pole, officials said. Here, the scene at the corner of Christopher Avenue and New Lots Avenue. (Andrew Hinderaker for The Wall Street Journal)


A woman lit a candle at a memorial at the entrance to the Grant Houses complex in Manhattan on Monday, following the murder of 18-year-old high school basketball standout Tayshana Murphy. Ms. Murphy was shot in the hallway of the public-housing project on Sunday. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)


A selection of whiskeys are on display at Whiskey Park, at 100 Central Park South in New York, N.Y. (Ramsay de Give for The Wall Street Journal)


One hundred dancers gathered around the Revson Fountain at Lincoln Center on Sunday morning to perform ‘The Table of Silence Project,’ a public tribute to the events of 9/11. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)


David Shih and Christine Toy Johnson rehearsed a scene from ‘Crane Story’ at the Cherry Lane Theatre. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)


Grilled Octopus, organic lentils and potatoes at Bocca East, 1496 Second Ave. at 78th Street. (Nick Brandreth for The Wall Street Journal)


The members of Squad One in Brooklyn’s Park Slope assembled to observe a moment of silence at 9:45am Sunday. The company lost 12 firefighters ten years ago at the World Trade Center. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)


A demonstration kiosk was set up on Wednesday in a pedestrian plaza south of Madison Square Park for a news conference announcing a bicycle-sharing program New York City plans to launch next year. (Mustafah Abdulaziz for The Wall Street Journal)


A 26-foot tall bronze sculpture, ‘Elefrandret,’ by artist Miquel Barceló was installed in Union Square in Manhattan. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)


Members of the press stood in the newly opened Memorial Plaza at Ground Zero during the opening of the National September 11 Memorial on Monday. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)


Leigh Keno, the host of the popular television show, ‘Antiques Roadshow,’ inspected a chair of Wall Street Journal columnist Ralph Gardner at his home on the Upper East Side. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)


Lifeguard Randy Dodd, center, carried a memorial wreath out to sea during a memorial service at Long Beach, Long Island, Sunday. Mr. Dodd and about 300 other surfers held a ceremony in the water, forming a circle and joining hands. Each surfer wore an armband with the name of a Sept. 11 first responder from Long Island. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)


Inside of the offices and manufacturing floor of the Lee Spring company, a tenant in the Brooklyn Army Terminal in Sunset Park (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


Third-grade teacher Tavares Bussey read out loud to his students during the first day of the school year at Brennan-Rogers, a K-8 public school in New Haven, Conn., on Sept. 1. (Jesse Neider for The Wall Street Journal)


Maggie Jewell, 6, created a makeshift memorial to her second cousin, Joseph G. Hunter, a firefighter who died at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2011, during a memorial service on the tenth anniversary of attacks at Lido Beach on Long Island on Sunday. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)

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10 years ago, on Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists seized control of four airplanes and crashed them all, bringing down the World Trade Center towers and ripping a hole in the Pentagon.

Throughout this anniversary day, the editors at Photo Journal will be live blogging the memorial ceremonies and worldwide reactions through a curated series of photographs. The images are posted as they become available and do not necessarily represent the time they were taken. The historical photos you see are juxtaposed with images from today.

If you would like to send your own photos to us for possible inclusion in the blog, please email them to yourphotos@wsj.com.

8:45 pm | by WSJ Photo Editors

The Tribute in Lights is illuminated on the skyline of Lower Manhattan on the evening marking the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York, September 11, 2011. (Gary Hershorn/Reuters)

5:29 pm | by WSJ Photo Editors

A New York City fireman returns to quarters in a firehouse at 48th Street and 8th Avenue after a 10th anniversary ceremony commemorating the 15 members of the New York City Fire Department, Ladder 4, Engine Company 54 who perished in the September 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center. (Peter Foley/European Pressphoto Agency)

5:25 pm | by WSJ Photo Editors

Lifeguard Randy Dodd, right, and a fellow lifeguard attach a memorial  wreath to Dodd's surfboard during a memorial service on the tenth anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks at Long Beach, Long Island, Sunday, September 11, 2011. Dodd and about 300 surfers took the wreath out to sea where they held a brief ceremony, forming a circle and joining hands, and placed the wreath in the water. Each surfer had an armband with the name of a Sept. 11 first responder from Long Island. A memorial mass was also held on the beach. The event was organized by The O'Keefe Foundation, named after Patrick O'Keefe, a firefighter who died in the attacks on Sept. 11. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)

4:28 pm | by WSJ Photo Editors

A man wearing a fireman's hat stands while an American flag covers the field during a ceremony before a game between the Buffalo Bills and the Kansas City Chiefs at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri on the tenth anniversary of the attacks of September 11, 2001. (Larry W. Smith/European Pressphoto Agency)

 

3:12 pm | by WSJ Photo Editors

Family members visit the Pentagon Memorial in Washington D.C. before ceremonies begin for the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. (Charles Dharapak/Associated Press)

3:04 pm | by WSJ Photo Editors

A U.S. Coast Guard Lieutenant who asked that his name not be used, kneels near his father's name after a remembrance ceremony at the Garden of Reflection Sunday, Sept. 11, 2011 in Yardley, Pa. The memorial honors people from Pennsylvania that lost their lives in the attacks Sept. 11, 2001. (Alex Brandon/Associated Press)

1:49 pm | by WSJ Photo Editors

Marie Lucania, center right, clutches the hand of her granddaughter Julianna Santella, 9, during a memorial service on the tenth anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks held at Lido Beach on Long Island, Sunday, September 11, 2011. Ms. Lucania lost her son, Charles Lucania, an electrician who worked at the towers. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)

12:32 pm | by WSJ Photo Editors

Mahmoud Doust and Julieth Munoz sit on a bench at a sunrise ceremony in Battery Park. They traveled to New York from Washington D.C. to be here for the 10th Anniversary of terror attacks on the World Trade Center. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)

12:19 pm | by WSJ Photo Editors

A rider from the Ride 2 Recovery 9/11 Challenge walks through the Empty Sky memorial in Liberty State Park in Jersey City, N.J. on Sunday. (Joe Epstein/Associated Press)

11:50 am | by WSJ Photo Editors

100 dancers gathered around the Revson Fountain at Lincoln Center in New York on Sunday. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)

11:31 am | by WSJ Photo Editors

Police officers from the United Kingdom march across the Brooklyn Bridge on the morning of the 10 year anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal)

11:26 am | by WSJ Photo Editors

Top: A family member touches the names of loved ones at the north pool of the 9/11 Memorial during the tenth anniversary ceremonies at the site of the World Trade Center. (David Handschuh/Press Pool)

Bottom: People run from the collapsed World Trade Center towers. (Suzanne Plunkett/Associated Press)

11:10 am | by WSJ Photo Editors

Top: A woman mourns at the Flight 93 National Memorial on the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, on September 11, 2011 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. (Kevin Dietsch/United Press International)

Bottom: Officials examine the crash site of United Airlines Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pa. (Scott Spangler, Tribune Review/Associated Press)

10:20 am | by WSJ Photo Editors

Top: Former first lady Laura Bush, from left, former President George W. Bush, first lady Michelle Obama and President Barack Obama hold hands to their hearts during the national anthem before a ceremony marking the 10th anniversary of the attacks in New York. (Jason DeCrow/Associated Press)

Bottom: The South Tower, left, begins to collapse. (Gulnara Samoilova/Associated Press)

9:52 am | by WSJ Photo Editors

Top: Soldiers from Task Force 3-66 Bravo Company of the 172 Infantry Brigade bow their heads during a prayer to remember the victims of 9/11 before a ceremony at Forward Operating Base (FOB) Kuschamond in Afghanistan. (Johannes Eisele/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

Bottom: A video still from a surveillance camera shows the impact after American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the Pentagon. (Associated Press)

9:27 am | by WSJ Photo Editors

Top: The 9/11 memorial ceremony is set to begin in New York. (Mladen Antonov/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

Bottom: United Airlines Flight 175 strikes the South Tower of the World Trade Center. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

9:04 am | by WSJ Photo Editors

Top: Frederick Meeks holds American flags in his hands as he stands at the World Trade Center site. (Eric Thayer/Reuters)

Bottom: Two men, identified by authorities as suspected hijackers Abdulaziz Alomari, left, and Mohamed Atta, right, pass through security at Portland International Jetport, Sept. 11, 2001, before flying to Boston where they boarded American Airlines Flight 11 that struck the North Tower of the World Trade Center. (Portland Police Department/Associated Press)

8:46 am | by WSJ Photo Editors

Robert Peraza, who lost his son Robert David Peraza, pauses at his son's name at the North Pool of the 9/11 Memorial on September 11, 2011, in New York. (Justin Lane/Press Pool)

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The smell of fixer is one of my oldest memories of photography and my dad’s Nikon SP and the black Besseler enlarger would eventually become part of my own path into photography. Robert Levin was a writer at heart, and didn’t flatter himself with comparisons to the pros of the day, who happened also to be his professional associates and friends, but took some pleasure in his creations. As an editor, he assigned Henri Cartier-Bresson to photograph Dr. Anthony Pisicano, a local Long Beach pediatrician, and the Frenchman visited or house. Weegee passed by the house once, and Life’s Bill Ray photographed our family for a Life Magazine. Bob’s photography books were among my earliest photographic influences, although the truth is that I came to photography in my 20’s, and that his friendship with Howard Chapnick of Black Star, who also lived in Long Beach, was a major door-opener for me.

When my father passed away in the early 70’s I was given two large boxes by his secretary at Redbook Magazine, containing thousands ofj prints, negatives and personal papers from his childhood in the Bronx, where he attended Dewitt Clinton High School amd eventually the City University of New York and then Columbia. Like many of the upwardly mobile Jewish families living in the Bronx, the Levins had begun a slow migration to Long Island. For Alfred and Frances Levin and their two boys, Long Beach was the preferred summertime residence. Alfred was a jewelry salesman, first travelling in the South and than opening up his own business in the Jewelry Exchange on 47th Street. America was both affluent and expanding, and young adults were mobile and interested in things like Kodak Brownie cameras, which were extremely popular and easy to use, and made photography available to the growing American middle class. The first section of pictures taken in Long Beach, of Bob and his friends were made with one of them.

Robert served in the military during World War II as a writer for Stars and Stripes, the army’s newspaper. But he returned to Europe after the war with my mother, Martha, and spent a year, writing and photographing extensively, this time with a black Rollei twin lens reflex camera. These photographs are among most interesting, moody still-lifes and landscapes, often inspired, or so she jokingly insisted, by the direction of my mother, who had studied art history, and considered herself to have the finer eye of the two. In fact, she took full credit for his ability with the camera.

After returning to New York, Robert freelanced as a writer for men’s magazines like Pageant and Coronet, writing detective stories and doing interviews with celebrities like Elizabeth Taylor and Jacqueline Kennedy. The young couple lived in Long Beach in a rented apartment, and looked foward to a bright future in a country of expanding opportunity. I was born in New York City in 1950, and with my sister Peri followed two years later Before settling in and buying a house with a GI Loan, my parents decided to return to Europe, and the four of us we sailed off to France pn the Liberte. We lived in England, France, Spain and Italy, and my dad continued to freelance for the men’s magazines. typing off manuscripts and mailing them off to his editors in New York. By this time he had purchased a Nikon 35mm camera which had become the rage in photography and was aware of the work of Cartier-Bresson, as he was of the progressive writers like Jean-Paul Satre, and of course the American Henry Miller, and in our little family he had a opportunity to document what was a very idyllic and transformational time. He liked street photography, but some of the most compelling images are clearly of his own family. I don’t remember him posing any pictures, he was definitely a bit of a lurker. He rolled his own film, and developed much of it in a portable darkroom.

The family returned to Long Island so that I could begin school. We bought a Levitt house in Long Beach, and eventually Bob would take an editorial position in Manhattan at Redbook Magazine and commuted by train or car from Long Beach. The photographs from this time period are less candid and more representative of special events, a school play or graduation, or a family gathering. Eventually he was able to purchase a larger home in nearby Lido Beach very close to the water and it is here that the photographs tapered off. A divorce, a new life in Manhattan, made photography more of an afterthought, and less of a passion. There was less time, and certainly much less time for the family on Long Island.
What has become clear to me, is that the camera and the photographs of the family represented a vision of what family life was supposed to be, rather than the reality of what it was, or what perhaps what my father was.

My own career as a photography, if you could call it a career, has roots in the work of my father’s pictures. My comfort about the camera, came directly as a result of its presence as an indicator of love. I started with the Nikon SP that was used for all of his European work, although by this time the SLR had become the magazine photographer’s workhorse, and I quickly gravitated to the newer cameras, for better or worse, and the eventual assignments that took me all over the world and allowed me more success than I ever thought possible as a professional photographer.

But looking back at my father’s pictures, what impresses me most is that some of the most meaningful images that we can take are of things that are of our families, our friends, our communities, and the moments of our lives that are worth preserving. All photographs are proof that something happened and a way to mark our time as we live our days, one at a time. The increased volume of images, from cell-phone cameras, digital SLRS and the like as easy to use as they are, doesn’t really change the reason for using a camera. And I can only wonder what the children of today will see forty years from now when looking back
at the images taken by their parents. Will they be nostalgic for the 2010s? Probably so,

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