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In January of 2010, Kesha Sebert, known as ‘Ke$ha’ debuted at number one on Billboard with her album, Animal. Her style is electro pop-y dance music: she alternates between rapping and singing, the choruses of her songs are typically melodic party hooks that bore deep into your brain: “Your love, your love, your love, is my drug!” And at times, her voice is so heavily processed that it sounds like a cross between a girl and a synthesizer. Much of her sound is due to the pitch correction software, Auto-Tune.

Sebert, whose label did not respond to a request for an interview, has built a persona as a badass wastoid, who told Rolling Stone that all male visitors to her tour bus had to submit to being photographed with their pants...

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Fishermen living around the port of El Callao, Peru have harvested the sea as a means of survival since the 16th century. Now, a global shipping industry giant based in the Netherlands is planning a project to modernize El Callao, Peru’s largest and oldest port. The project will expand port operations over the next couple [...]

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The photographer Tim Greyhavens has documented the modern sites of historic anti-Chinese violence in the United States long ago, challenging his audience to draw the connections from past to present.

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There's still time! The deadline for entries for this year's National Geographic Photo Contest is November 30. Photographers of all skill levels (last year more than 16,000 images submitted by photographers from 130 countries) enter photographs in three categories: Nature, People and Places. The photographs are judged on creativity and photographic quality by a panel of experts. There is one first place winner in each category and a grand prize winner as well. The following is a selection of 54 entries from each of the 3 categories. The caption information is provided and written by the individual photographer. -- Paula Nelson (54 photos total)
LONE TREE YELLOWSTONE: A solitary tree surviving another harsh winter in Yellowstone National Park. Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. (Photo and caption by Anita Erdmann/Nature/National Geographic Photo Contest)

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INTRODUCING ERIN PURCELLE

I emerged from my mother’s womb in Southern California. My dwelling lies approximately 45 minutes south of Los Angeles and 10 minutes from the Pacific Coast. Those are just about the only pleasant things I acknowledge concerning my hometown. I’m more than ready to leave the nest and wander new lands. I turned 18 years old on March 4th. A friend of mine in middle school had started a blog consisting of kids in the neighborhood and around school. She asked me to contribute to it, so I simply borrowed cameras and took basic portraits of my friends. Although I’ve been taking photos since I was 13, it never actually entailed any creative process or vision. I was more focused on studio art (painting, drawing, sculpting, etc.) and didn’t regard photography as an intuitive and efficient form of expression for me till I was 16, midway into my sophomore year of high school. I was given a digital SLR Canon Rebel Xsi, my first camera. (I have obtained 7 additional cameras and only shoot 35mm and Polaroids now). But, since then, an intrinsic and idiosyncratic relationship began evolve into what it is now. Taking photos allows me to encapsulate the briefness of life and its brilliance through my eyes. I intend to keep it mildly objective by obscuring the subject’s faces and settings in all of my images, so that the viewer simply identifies with the human subject through acknowledging the fact they are also human and living while concurrently communicating the ambiguity and resonance life generally holds. Using double exposures allows me to transmit a fading effect that visually parallels the transient longevity of life. This, with the combination of bold colors, creates the duality I strive to achieve and exhibits the reverie I live through. I don’t want to plainly record using an image, but share the world through my mind’s eye. Physical manipulations, such as scratching and dousing prints with chemicals, permits me to express a general idea in my own personal manner. All these aspects of my work relay the ominous, fleeting, mystifying, and hauntingly beautiful qualities of human existence. Since photography became such a crucial component of my being, I pay a more significant amount of attention admiring and observing my surroundings. It gives me purpose, and makes me feel more fulfilled than anything life has ever offered me. Without photography, I would have an insufficient means of expression and disoriented passion. Currently, my favorite camera  is my Spectra. This is a photo of my friend Claudia. We originally got together to study for a major test coming up, but ended up going on an adventure and catching tadpoles after I took photos of her. I hold such an immense amount of fondness for Alison Scarpulla, ƒenk, and Ellen Rogers. They create such astounding and transcendental realms of splendor.

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(Hiroshi Kawahara / Getty Images)

This combo picture taken by Sendai city official Hiroshi Kawahara on March 11 and released through Jiji Press on March 25 shows (top to bottom) muddy tsunami water swallowing vehicles and houses at a bridge and finally coming to rest in Sendai city in Miyagi prefecture. Two weeks after a giant quake struck and sent a massive tsunami crashing into the Pacific coast, the death toll from Japan's worst post-war disaster topped 10,000 and there was scant hope for 17,500 others still missing.

John Makely writes: For the more images of the tragedy in Japan and recovery efforts click here.

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