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Publisher Verso writes: It is assumed that every inch of the world has been explored and charted; that there is nowhere new to go. But perhaps it is the everyday places around us--the cities we live in--that need to be rediscovered. What does it feel like to find the city's edge, to explore its forgotten tunnels and scale unfinished skyscrapers high above the metropolis? Explore Everything reclaims the city, recasting it as a place for endless adventure.

Plotting expeditions from London, Paris, Berlin, Detroit, Chicago, Las Vegas and Los Angeles, Bradley L. Garrett has evaded urban security in order to experience the city in ways beyond the boundaries of conventional life. He calls it 'place hacking': the recoding of closed, secret, hidden and forgotten urban space to make them realms of opportunity.

Explore Everything is an account of the author's escapades with the London Consolidation Crew, an urban exploration collective.

The book is also a manifesto, combining philosophy, politics and adventure, on our rights to the city and how to understand the twenty-first century metropolis.

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Emerging Photographer Fund – 2012 Runner up

 

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ESSAY CONTAINS EXPLICIT CONTENT

EPF 2012 Finalist

 

Simona Ghizzoni

Afterdark. Consequences of War on Women in the Gaza Strip.

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I reached the Occupied Palestinian Territories for the first time in 2010, on assignement with a friend journalist, to document the condition of palestinian women in the Gaza Strip. At that time, we had the access to the Gaza Strip denied by the Israeli Government. To me it was a big surprise, so I decided to spend a couple of months in Jerusalem and the West Bank in order to see and understand more of the social and political situation in Israel and the Occupied Territories. That was the beginning of my long-term project about the consequences of war on women’s lives, Afterdark.
A few months later I got the permission to enter the Gaza Strip, where I stayed as a whole around three months, documenting the aftermath of Cast Lead Operation (ended in 2009) and the life of women in the extremely complex contest of the Strip.
Women in Gaza suffer of a double pressure: the isolation from the outside world imposed by Israeli blockade, with all the economical, physical and psychological consequences, and, on the other hand, the worsening of  women’s human rights conditions under Hamas government, heading towards an effective gender separation.
Through the stories of the women I met, I am trying to understand what actually happens when a military operation is declared a success, how is the return to normality of life, and which normality can be actually restored, in order to avoid to forget the real human toll of any war.
The funding of this project would help me return to the Gaza Strip on a regular basis for the next year, since I’m planning to follow up with the stories of five of the women I met on my first trip, all of them suffering both physically and psychologically from the traumas they experienced during the war. It would also allow me to start the production of a short documentary about their everyday lives in Gaza, related to the development of the social and political situation in the Strip.

 

Bio

Simona Ghizzoni was born in Reggio Emilia, Italy, in 1977.
She studied with Giorgia Fiorio in  Reflexions Masterclass and attended the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass.
In 2006  she tied for first prize at the FNAC photo contest, with the work “Scars”, an essay on Sarajevo ten years after the end of the war.
From 2006 to 2010 she worked on the project “Odd Days”, about Eating Disoders.
Awarded with  the 3rd  prize single portrait at World Press Photo 2008 and PHotoEspaña Ojodepez Award for Human Values in 2009.
Since 2010 she began a long term project about the consequences of war on women’s lives, working on  Iraqi refugees in Jordan, in the West Bank and Gaza Strip and in Western Sahara, thanks to The Aftermath Project.
With the project “Afterdark”, about the condition of female victims of Cast Lead operation in the Gaza Strip, she was awarded with the 3rd  prize Contemporary Isssues at World Press Photo 2012.

 

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Features and Essays

The end game in Libya…Bryan Denton has been in the country for most of the last six months covering the events for the New York Times…NYT Lens interviewed him as rebels were pushing towards Tripoli end of last week…

Bryan Denton: Tomorrow Tripoli (NYT Lens: August 2011)

New York Times’ The Battle for Libya gallery … impressive selection from February onwards.

Libya galleries from TIME, NPR, The Atlantic’s In Focus, The Foreign Policy, and Wall Street Journal…

TIME: Libyan Rebels Move on Tripoli 

NPR: The Story Of Libya’s Revolt, In Pictures 

The Atlantic In Focus blog: Qaddafi Losing Grip on Libya

The Foreign Policy: Triumph in Tripoli 

WSJ: Libya’s Revolution

Moises Saman captured the mood in Tripoli just before the rebel push…

Moises Saman: Gaddafi Defiant (Magnum: August 2011)

Maybe a good time to recap on some of the events in the Middle East this year,  by looking at this TIME video of Yuri Kozyrev’s work from Yemen, Egypt, Bahrain, and Libya again…also as Visa Pour l’Image is just around the corner… and the festival will showcase some of the work…

Yuri Kozyrev: On Revolution Road (TIME: June 2011)

Moving on from Libya to other things…

New York Times Magazine did something special with their What They Were Thinking last weekend…

NYT Magazine: Classic Magazine Photographs, Then and Now (NYT Mag: August 2011) “What they were thinking then. What are they thinking now.”

From National Geographic Magazine’s September issue…

Brent Stirton: The Sahara’s Tuareg (NGM: September 2011)

John Stanmeyer: Brazil’s Girl Power (NGM: September 2011)

Michael ‘Nick’ Nichol: Orphan Elephants (NGM: September 2011)

New on VII website…

Giulio Di Sturco: Somali Famine (VII Mentor: August 2011)

Erin Trieb: The Homecoming (VII Mentor: August 2011)

Sim Chi Yin: China’s Lead Curse (VII Mentor: August 2011)

Venetia Dearden: Mariinsky Ballet (VII Network: August 2011)

Lynsey Addario: Saudi Life (VII Network: August 2011)

From VII Magazine…

Antonin Kratochvil: Incognito (VII Magazine: August 2011)

Giulio di Sturco: Doolow Somalia (VII Mag: August 2011)

Jonathan Saruk: Kabul’s Movie Theaters (Reportage by Getty Images: August 2011)

Moises Saman: Syria, Decisively Seen (TIME LB: August 2011)

William Daniels: Revisiting Japan’s Ground Zero (TIME LB: August 2011)

Jake Price: Japan, Five Months On (BNN: August 2011)

Daniel Berehulak: Pakistan: One Year Later (Newsweek: August 2011)

Abbas: Sources of the Ganges (Magnum: August 2011)

Samuel James: In Nigeria, an Islamist Insurgency Strengthens (NYT: August 2011)

Bruce Davidson: NYC Subway Commuters in the 80s (Flavorwire: 2011)

Taslima Akhter: Garment Workers in Bangladesh (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Marcus Bleasdale: Ripe With Abuse (HRW: August 2011)

Jehad Nga: Dadaab (New Yorker: August 2011)

Peter Greste: Somalis Flee to Ethiopia (Al Jazeera: August 2011)

Davin Ellicson: Postcard from Bucharest: After the Revolution (New Yorker Photo Booth: August 2011)

Carlos Saveedra: Daughters of the Goddess Huitaca (Foto8: August 2011)

Alizandra Fazzina: Paper Mill 2 (NOOR: August 2011)

9/11…VII newsletter about the upcoming tenth anniversary with links to features…

VII: 911 Tenth Anniversary (VII: August 2011)

911 with Holgas and Lomos..New trend developing? First Tama/Getty and now Stapleton/Reuters…compare here

Shannon Stapleton: A Different View of 911 (Reuters: August 2011)

Michal Chelbin: Prison Portraits (New Yorker: August 2011)

Brian Shumway: True Men (burn: August 2011)

Anthony Suau: Turmoil on Wall Street (Facing Change: August 2011)

Andrew Moore: Love in Detroit’s Ruins (NYT: August 2011)

Piotr Malecki: Call Centre (Panos: August 2011)

Seamus Murphy: London Riots (Stern: August 2011)

Ryan Gauvin: Shots Out the Rough (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Julio Bittencourt: Big Pool of Ramon (TIME LB: August 2011)

Evan Vucci: Killer Blue- Baptized by Fire (Photographer’s Vimeo:2011)

Evan Vucci: We Don’t Have Enough Power to Fight (Photographer’s Vimeo: 2011)

Thomas Hoepker: Berlin Vintage (Guardian: August 2011)

Stephen Dupont: Generation AK (Vimeo: 2011)

Stephen Shames: Bronx Boys (TIME LB: August 2011)

Sarina Finkelstein: Modern Day Gold Prospectors (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Rodrigo Abd: Mayan Women (Oregonian: 2011)

Articles 

Guardian: Sean Smith’s Best Shot (Guardian: August 2011)

Assignment Chicago: 7 Lies About Photojournalists (Chicago Tribune: August 2011)

TIME LB: John Moore’s story behind the photo : Somalia, One Mother’s Unspeakable Loss (TIME LB: August 2011)

David Campbell: Imaging famine: How critique can help (DC blog: August 2011)

Visual Culture Blog: Defacing Gaddafi (Visual Culture Blog: August 2011)

PDN: Judge Dismisses Copyright Suit Against Ryan McGinley as “Wasteful” (PDN: August 2011)

Lisa Pritchard: Ask An Agent 2 (LPA blog: August 2011)

photo: Massimo Vitali

New York Times Mag: A View From the High (NYT Mag: August 2011) Massimo Vitali

Telegraph: Lomography: the digital photo sceptics strike back (Telegraph: August 2011)

Telegraph: Instagram, Hipstamatic and the mobile photography movement (Telegraph: August 2011)

BJP: Corbis signs deal with Associated Press

BJP: BBC’s Twitter statement is “unacceptable”, says NUJ

Nowness: Corinne Day : Heaven is Real (Nowness: August 2011)

BJP: Award-winning war documentary comes to the UK

photo: Paolo Patrizi

Prison Photography: Photographing the Prostitutes of Italy’s Backroads: Google Street View vs. Boots on the Ground (Prison Photography: August 2011)

Related..

Conscientious: Google Street View and Authorship (Conscientious: August 2011)

MSNBC: At 83, subject of ‘American Girl in Italy’ photo speaks out (MSNBC: August 2011)

NPR: In Japan, Restoring Photos For Tsunami Victims (NPR: August 2011)

PDN: Lee Miller: Great Conflict Photographer, Not So Great Parent (PDN: August 2011)

Carol Guzy: Losing Miss Cassie (Washington Post: 2010)

Events

If you happen to be in Scotland this coming weekend…Some great events and talks happening as part of the Festival of Politics…World Press Photo exhibition and Anastasia Taylor-Lind showing some  of her work and participating in another talk…

Festival of Politics:  Raised by Women: A Photographic Essay on Female Dominated Communities : Anastasia Taylor Lind : Where: Scottish Parliament : Edinburgh : Saturday 27 August, 11:00 – 12:00, Committee Room 3, FREE Chaired by Olivier Laurent, News and Online Editor, British Journal of Photography. Also: Covering Conflict: the role of the photographer and artist : Saturday 27 August, 17:30 – 18:30, Committee Room 3, FREE

Magnum in Motion, Live : NYC (TIME LB)

Crowd Funding - Focused (IndieGoGo)

Interviews and Talks

David Campbell and Jon Levy : ”Aesthetics have no place in photographing famine” (OPEN-i Vimeo: August 2011)

Peter Dench (Telegraph: August 2011)

Ashley Gilbertson (PRX: August 2011)

Don McCullin (TateShots on Youtube: August 2011)

Steve Pyke (Hungry Eye: August 2011)

Ben Lowy (Conscientious: August 2011)

Leonie Hampton (Ideas Tap: August 2011)

Shannon Stapleton (Reuters: August 2011)

Yannis Behrakis (Reuters: August 2011)

Brassai (ASX)

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

photo: Samuel James

Exposure Alexandra Boulat Award for Photojournalism : inaugural winner Samuel James. Work ‘Lagos, Area‘ syndicated by VII

Lens Culture Awards includes, documentary, fine art, abstract, and photojournalism. Deadline Sept.17

Ian Parry Scholarship Private view (Olivier Laurent’s Vimeo: August 2011)

Movies and Videos

The Mexican Suitcase

Paul Strand : Under the Dark Cloth (Youtube)

Hungry Eye TV

Agencies

Anne Bourgeois-Vignon joins INSTITUTE as Director of INSTITUTE | news on BJP

Falcon

Photographers

Justin Maxon

Rian Dundon

Angelos Giotopoulos

Stephanie Foden

Jobs

MSF Canada

Video Producer/Editor for msnbc.com in NYC

Whitechapel Gallery are hiring a Schools & Families Education Curator

To finish off…

From Gawker…Experience an Entire Day in New York in One Photograph…Very entertaining photos by Stephen Wilkes

Photoshop horrors….

Either Testino retouchers photochopped Kate Moss’ daughter’s fingers on purpose or someone fucked up bad…

Also…

This timelapse video of a day in California is worth checking out too..

See also Little People

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Just do what I say and everything will be alright.

It’s time for the return of my irregular series in which I tell games developers exactly what they must do and not do if they want to avoid being flayed and rolled in salt. You can see the rest of these rules here. It’s quite simple: obey my commands and everyone will be happy. No one needs to lose a life.

(more…)

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Director: Takashi Miike
Starring: Kôji Yakusho, Goro Inagaki, Yûsuke Iseya, Takayuki Yamada

Summary: A group of assassins come together for a suicide mission to kill an evil lord.

Director Takashi Miike is best known in the West for the supremely twisted genre flicks Audition and Ichi the Killer, but perhaps not for much longer. 13 Assassins, a far more traditional film than you might expect, may just grab him a whole new audience. A remake of Eiichi Kudo's 1963 film Jûsan-nin no shikaku, it's a thrilling, claret-drenched samurai romp with the best climactic battle scene in recent memory.

The first 80 or so minutes are all about the build-up. Set in the mid-1800s, when a crumbling feudal Shogunate still ruled Japan, the despicable Lord Naritsugu Matsudaira (played with brilliant menace by Gorô Inagaki) runs amok, lopping off limbs and tongues, raping whoever he wants and using his underlings as target practice. He’s basically a pretty nasty chap.

Growing concerned about the damage Lord Naritsugu may do when he rises up the ranks, Shogun official Sir Doi (Mikijiro Hira) hires respected samurai Shinzaemon Shimada (Kôji Yakusho) to assassinate him and prevent any further dishonour. What follows is a lengthy sequence where Shinzaemon gathers his team.

Thanks to the sheer number of samurai amassed by Shinzaemon, this sequence lacks the power of Seven Samurai, the film to which it is clearly indebted. Many of the gang are just fodder. But there's some interesting character amongst them, nevertheless. Shinzaemon's gambling-addicted nephew Shinrokuro (Takayuki Yamada) and the tubby, way-past-his-sell-by-date Sahara (Arata Furuta) stand out. Yet it's the 13th assassin that steals the show, and he's not even a true samurai. Yûsuke Iseya is brilliant as the simian, woods-dwelling Koyata, offering some much needed comic relief to offset the stunted world of the samurai.

But all of this is foreplay. The final battle erupts in a torrent of blood as Shinzaemon's samurai square off against Naritsugu's army in a town rigged with booby traps and weaponry. Spiked wooden walls come crunching together, flames and explosives rip through walls and enemies. At one point a herd of bulls come screaming into an enclosed area, their backs on fire, goring and stomping as they go.

It's the swordplay that really stands out, however. They may not look like much but Shinzaemon's rag-tag gang know how to cut it up. And that's exactly what they do. Heads roll, limbs fly and guts spill in a display that's at once horrifically, gleefully violent, yet also rather constrained, considering Miike's back catalogue. Apart from the bit where a literal tide of blood comes washing over the protagonists, that is. That the film manages to keep the relentless action going for 45 minutes, without once loosing impetus is nothing short of remarkable.

Such is the assured polish of 13 Assassins, it's amazing that principle photography was completed in just two weeks. It looks and sounds gorgeous, a straight-up samurai masterpiece. Indeed, it may signal a resurgence of the genre. Miike is currently putting the finishing touches to another chanbara, Hara-Kiri: Death of a Samurai. If it's even half as good as this, we're in for a treat.

Trailer

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