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Features and Essays

Last week saw the tenth anniversary of the war in Afghanistan..

Most of you have probably already seen this…nevertheless….LightBox put up a gallery of 43 images by war photographers in Afghanistan and the images that moved them most….Lot of familiar frames by Anderson, Morris, Sinclair, Bronstein, Haviv, Murphy, van Agtmael, Nachtwey, etc…. you name it…Hadn’t seen this one by Emilio Morenatti before…

Photo: Emilio Morenatti/AP. Afghanistan. October 4, 2004.

TIME Lightbox: Afghanistan: The Photographs That Moved Them Most (LightBox) Includes Michael Kamber  commenting on a  Tim Hetherington photo and Pancho Bernasconi commenting on a Chris Hondros photo

Just noticed Patrick Witty tweet that this week’s TIME International cover story is on Afghanistan..Cover photo by Adam Ferguson…My eyes were drawn to the headline that accompanies the image… “Why The US Will Never Save Afghanistan”…you compare that to the famous 2010 cover with Jodi Bieber’s Aisha portrait with the headline “What Happens if We Leave Afghanistan”,and I would argue there’s been a change in Afghanistan thinking at TIME’s editorial desk…see the covers side-by-side here.

Panos have a slideshow of Afghanistan images from the past ten years… Was looking at the below Martin Adler one from Kabul in 2002, and noticed the building looked familiar… realised it’s the same one as in a famous Simon Norfolk one from 2001… See the two side-by-side here

Photo: Martin Adler/Panos. Afghanistan. Kabul. 2002.

Panos Pictures (various photographers): 10 Years of War in Afghanistan (Panos)

Donovan Wylie: Capturing the Architecture of War Before It’s Gone (Lightbox)

Nice series on Lightbox by Gillian Laub from a Tel Aviv beach..Was surprised to see the credit didn’t mention Institute… Checked her website…Looks she’s no longer represented by them…

Gillian Laub: Tel Aviv Beach (TIME Lightbox)

Occupy Wall Street…

Nina Berman: Occupy Wall Street (NOOR)

Yunghi Kim: Faces of Occupy Wall Street (Photographer’s website)

Life.com: Occupy Wall Street (Life) Photos by various photographers

Larry Fink: Occupy Wall Street in 1967 (New Yorker)

From Newsweek…First Donald Weber’s photos from Japan… See later in this post for info on Weber’s grant writing workshop…

Donald Weber: Japan: Life After Zero Hour (Newsweek) Fukushima

Lynsey Addario: Famine in Africa’s Horn (Newsweek)

Rafal Milach: Life in Putin’s Russia (Newsweek)

More Russia… this by new VII member Davide Monteleone…

Davide Monteleone: Russian Soul (Phaidon)

Tomas Munita: Chilean Miners (NYT)

Stuart Freedman: Delhi’s Army of Homeless (Panos)

Lauren Greenfield: Child Beauty Queens (Institute)

Lauren Greenfield: Boom to Bust in Ireland (Institute)

Peter diCampo: Ivory Coast (VII Magazine)

Jonathan Saruk: Kabul Cinemas (MSNBC)

Richard Renaldi: Touching Strangers (TIME LightBox)

Lynsey Addario: Kenya (Starved for Attention)

Damir Sagolj: Hunger in North Korea (NYT Lens)

Peter Beste: Norwegian Black Metal (New Yorker)

Robin Hammond: Condemned (Panos)

Seamus Murphy: Libya (VII)

Tom Hyde: After The Fall (Statement Images)

Richard Nicholson: The Last Of London’s Darkrooms (NPR)

Giorgos Moutafis: The Arab Spring Project (Foto8) Moutafis’ website 

Xavier Comas: The House of the Raja (LightBox)

Elliott Erwitt: Sequentially, Yours (Magnum)

Matt Bowditch: Afghan Blueys (Lightbox)

Maciej Dakowicz: Cardiff Nights (M – Le Monde magazine)

Daniel Lilley: The Isle of Vindelis (Foto8)

Interviews and Talks

Don McCullin (CNN)

VII photographers Kashi, Pagetti, Bleasdale, Kratochvil interviewed (Canon Digital Learning Center)

Finbarr O’Reilly (Reuters Photo blog)

It appears Martin Parr has ditched the Nintendo.. Looks like he’s doing his thang with 5D kit and a Gary Fong diffuser in this video…

Martin Parr (YouTube) “Magnum photographer Martin Parr was asked by FotoFreo Festival Director Bob Hewitt to photograph three Western Australian port cities, Fremantle, Broome and Port Hedland.”

Paolo Woods (YouTube)

Davide Monteleone (BJP)

Free Sunday evening? Check this out…

Photo: John Moore/Getty Images

BagNewsSalon webinar discussing the visual framing of “The Great Recession” in the United States and Europe : Date: Sunday October 16th : Time: 10 am PST/1 pm EST/6pm GMT (running for 90 minutes) : Where:  Open-i platform, hosted by the London School of Communications, via live audio : Facebook RSVP here.

Mirjana Vrbaski (Conscientious)

Laura El-Tantawi (Emphas.is)

Jake Price (Verve)

Sergey Chilikov (BJP)

Articles 

Guardian’s monthly recommendations on exhibitions and books…

photo: Bruce Davidson  .. Was fiddling Davidson’s book last weekend…Stunning photos..

Guardian: The Month in Photography

More on the Davidson work…

Guardian: Bruce Davidson’s subway photography takes us to New York’s heart

New Yorker: New Photography at MOMA

BBC: Injured photographer Giles Duley wants Afghanistan return

Magnum Photos have some found Libyan Secret Service photos in their archive…David Campbell raised the issue should they be for sale like any other Magnum photo… Read the debate below…I saw some of the photos printed in the Guardian in July…Credited to Magnum Photos…pic of the spread here (had it on my iPhone)..I don’t know did Guardian have to pay Magnum for this set to be published…

David Campbell: The Libyan Secret Service photo archive – questions for Magnum Photos (DC Storify)

David Campbell: The problem with the dramatic staging of photojournalism: what is the real issue? (DC website)

Telegraph: Diane Arbus, in her own words (TelePhoto)

Telegraph: An Emergency in Slow Motion: The Inner Life of Diane Arbus by William Todd Schultz: review (Telegraph)

NYT Lens: Bringing Turkish Photography to the World Stage

PDN: Steve Jobs: Visionary, Inventor, and Very Challenging Photo Subject (PDN)

Reasons Why Professional Photographers Cannot Work for Free (Professional Photographers)

Nick Turpin: Distrify: A new model for distribution? (photographer’s blog)

Time: Joel Sternfeld: A Modern Master’s First Pictures (Time Lightbox)

Thames and Hudson: Magnum Contact Sheets – Production

Wayne Ford: We English: Simon Roberts extensive survey of the English at leisure (Wayne Ford Posterous)

BJP: Noor Images adds Andrea Bruce and Giancarlo Ceraudo as new members

No Caption Needed: Review of Errol Morris, Believing is Seeing (Observations on the Mysteries of Photography) (New York: Penguin, 2011) (No Caption Needed)

Joanna Hurley: Notes on the Artist Statement (Hurley Media)

A Photo Editor: Why Does Everyone Think They Need A Photo Book? (APE) Joerg Colberg’s thoughts on the matter

Granta: Remembering Tim Hetherington

PDN Photo of the Day: Marcus Bleasdale: Early Morning Prayers (PDN)

NYT Lens: Jack Delano’s American Sonata

Gizmodo: Photoshop Will End Blurry Pics Forever

Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Manu Brabo

Guardian: Featured photojournalist Ahmad Masood

The Independent: Out with the new: Turbine Hall’s latest work is tribute to old movies (Independent) | slide show (Guardian)  On a slightly different note, I was at Tate Modern over the weekend and saw their shop is selling Martin Parr Autoportrait ceramic plates for £65.. Fancy one? Take a look

Verve Photo: Diana Markosian (Verve)

Verve Photo: Katie Orlinsky (Verve)

Wired: Back to Basics: Analog Photography Project Aims to Slow Things Down

Adam Marelli: An in-depth look at Henri Cartier-Bresson’s composition style (adammarelliphoto.com)

Magnum Photos: Advice to young photographers (PDF)

Telegraph: National Gallery announces first major photography exhibition

PDN: Who Photographers Follow On Tumblr

Crowd funding

Condemned by Robin Hammond (Emphas.is)

Land of Hope and Dreams by Amnon Gutman (Kickstarter)

BTC oil pipeline by Amanda Rivkin (Empas.is)

Agencies and Collectives

Aletheia Newsletter

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

More awards for Yuri Kozyrev…

Yuri Kozyrev Wins 2 Prix Bayeux-Calvados Awards for Libya Coverage (PDN) Same news on BJP

Magenta Flash Forward 2012 Call for Submissions

Reminders…

Applications for the Tim Hetherington Grant are due 15 Oct. 

Time LightBox Next Generation Competition

NatGeo Photo Contest

IdeasTap Photographic Award: Finalists

Workshops

Grant Writing with Donald Weber : NYC Nov 17, 2011 : DC Nov 19, 2011

Duckrabbit three-day photo film workshops in London (30 Nov-2 Dec) and Birmingham (7-9 Dec)

Jobs

Brighton Photo Fringe is seeking a new Director

Events

BJP Vision 2011

multiMedia and Photo Communities

Foam Talent issue : Issuu

1000 Words : new issue

Contacts Editions

F8Magazine

52 by 52 : “A weekly photo challenge is set by fifty-two accomplished photographers throughout the course of a year”

Photographers

Reuters photographer, Finbarr O’Reilly, who shot the World Photo of the Year 2005,  has a website now…

Finbarr O’Reilly

Carlos Javier Ortiz

Paul Jeffrey

Sean Hawkey

To finish off… Seen it before, but was a giggle to bump into this again… The Life of Photographer

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“Every Jew has two requests of God: a place in paradise in the next world, and a place on the Tel Aviv beach in this world,” wrote Sholem Asch, the Polish-born novelist, in 1937. Stretching five kilometers from its southern tip at the old port city of Jaffa to the new cluster of high rise hotels and condos at its northern end, Tel Aviv’s beach (or Tayelet as it’s called in Hebrew) probably looked a little different in Asch’s day. But I think of him as part of a long legacy of both travelers and natives who have sought refuge in those sands from Israel’s political dramas, which can gush like a Texas oil well. At the beach, I discovered Israel in all its vitality, without the conflict.

I have been photographing in Israel for almost ten years. The beach is where I go to escape. I walk the full expanse of the shoreline, stopping every few feet to capture a moment. Others are there to escape, too: an eclectic mix of people—old, young, skinny, zaftig and maimed—interact there unlike anywhere else. Arab and Orthodox Jewish women, covered nearly head-to-toe, splash ecstatically in the waves. Suntanned Israeli men parade like peacocks in tiny speedos and large jewelry. Bespectacled, pre-pubescent Americans on teen tours, relatively new Russian emigrants, even newer Ethiopians, and the newest residents—exhausted Philippino or Chinese foreign workers. Everyone is there, and for the same same purpose: to take a break.

This is a nation filled with serious conversations and serious consequences, bad omens from the past and dire warnings of the future. But not on this sliver of sand. Only Tel Aviv’s beach has that unique ability to free Israelis from the yoke of daily turmoil, letting them frolic, flaunt and laugh—a joyful, if temporary, exhalation under a pure, blue sky. The beach, I’ve come to realize, is where the country comes to breathe.

Gillian Laub’s book Testimony, which features portraits of Israelis and Palestinians, was published in 2007. She is currently at work on a book and documentary about the American South.

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From continued “Occupy Wall Street” protests and Amanda Knox’s appeal verdict to Steve Jobs’ passing and the tenth anniversary of the U.S. War in Afghanistan, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

See last week’s Pictures of the Week.

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I first met Steve Jobs on a photo shoot for TIME in 1982. I had no idea that he was going to be my friend or that he was going to be this incredible genius — a part of all our lives, in what we do and what we see. He was speaking to a group of Stanford students in a dorm living room, and it was hard to photograph him there and not be in the way. You had to have light, and I was creeping around. But he was game. I asked him to stand on top of an Apple sign, and he did it. I asked him to stand in front of an Apple cutout (which ended up on the cover of Fortune magazine), and he did that too. I thought, This is you. This is who you are.

He was so much fun because he was so quick — he was such a fast study. You showed him anything and he could get it in a second. I was always fascinated by his design sense. It was wonderful because he liked my pictures.

I really will miss his inventiveness, his ideas, his eyes — and how bright he was all over. He had some kind of electricity about him. He was very, very focused in the office. He demanded a lot of the people who worked for him. I’m sure Steve wasn’t the easiest person to work for, but what a fascinating person to work for.

Diana Walker was TIME’s White House photographer for 20 years, where she captured intimate moments with five Presidents. 

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Xavier Comas, a Spanish photographer based in Bangkok, brings us a haunting set of photographs from Thailand’s southern borderlands. The population here is majority ethnic Malay and Muslim—the descendants of those who once lived in an independent sultanate, whose lands were annexed more than a century ago by Thailand’s Buddhist kings. A longstanding insurgency blows hot and cold in the provinces of Pattani, Yala and Narathiwat, and the region reels from the clandestine attacks of militants and the oft-bloody (and extra-judicial) reprisals of state security forces. Some 60,000 Thai troops are stationed in the country’s restive south.

But Comas’s pictures have little to do with these surface tensions. Instead, he delves into an altogether more elusive and eerie border realm, one of shadows and spirits and the ghosts of a faded past. Camped out in Narathiwat’s Kampung Takok—”scaring village” or “village of fear” in the local Malay vernacular—Comas spent days and nights in the decrepit shell of a once splendid palace. The Rumoh Raja (the “Raja’s house”) used to be occupied by Tengku Samsuddin, a turn of the century aristocrat who governed the semi-autonomous Malay state of Legeh until it and other territories were swallowed up by the kings of Siam in 1909 under the edicts of an Anglo-Thai treaty.

Comas describes the residence as “crippled” and “collapsed,” withering under a “cancer of neglect.” In earlier times, though, its finely carved teak halls would have borne witness and played host to the riches of a host of empires—the Dutch, the Chinese, the Portuguese and others. Now, the building has been stripped and plundered of its luxuries. But it’s not empty. Living inside the wrecked palace is a motley group of women, elders and a few children. They were brought to the house by a man believed to have blood ties to its former inhabitants: Daiyoha, a 76-year-old shaman who Comas says “is the strangest man I’ve ever met.”

Though Muslim, many in this part of southern Thailand also heed older animist traditions. Daiyoha, who appears to the right in the fifth photo, believes in the power of supernatural forces, and carries rings, quartz amulets and other totemic objects. For decades, a hulking wooden eagle was perched in a space of prominence inside the palace, a menacing talisman that spoke of the royal family’s power. That was carried off years ago. But the shaman still brandishes the ancient Kris dagger of the palace’s Rajas, and claims the sacred weapon can fly on its own. He says the upper floors of the palace are haunted by—among other apparitions—the spirits of two women in red, court concubines who still dance in mourning for their fallen Raja.

Comas sees no poltergeists during one lonely night-time vigil, but feels a vast silence cloaking the house, its dilapidated rooms strewn with coffee cups, animal droppings and the rusted traces of brighter days. The structure still stands on what Comas deems “formidable pillars,” suffused with stories and spirits, perhaps imperceptible to our eyes now, but alive in the flutter of a rattan blind and the fall of a shadow. Standing in the manse’s top floor, Comas looks up. “Frail moonlight shimmers through punctures in the roof,” he says, “like stars in a second sky.”

Xavier Comas is a Spanish photographer based in Bangkok, Thailand. He began his career as designer, photographer and illustrator, focusing on book cover art for years. More of his photography can be seen here.

Ishaan Tharoor is a writer-reporter for TIME and editor of Global Spin. Find him on Twitter at @ishaantharoor. You can also continue the discussion on TIME’s Facebook page and on Twitter at @TIMEWorld.

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