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If you were one of the few Americans who caught the second Euro 2012 semifinal last Thursday, you were in for a soccer treat. After two relatively tepid nil-nil draws (England/Italy, Portugal/Spain) that went the distance, the battle between Germany (one of the pre-tournament favors) and Italy (perennial European powerhouse) was an exhilarating goalfest. History ultimately prevailed, as once again, the Italians booted the Germans out of a major international tournament, led by the ageless, timeless Andres Pirlo. The Germans also suffered another surprising blow, in the form of some unflattering editing.

Despite solid all around play by the hard working Germans, the azzurri struck fast and hard on the counter. By the the 36th minute, Italian striker Mario “ Super Mario ” Balotelli had scored the second, killer goal.

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A trip to one of the most infamous sites of recent world history provides a moment for reflection. The EURO 2012 championship, a team event for players and photographers is a whirl of activity, but...

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silentbrad points out an article about the gradual shift of video games from being 'goods' to being 'services.' They spoke with games lawyer Jas Purewal, who says the legal interpretation is murky: "If we're talking about boxed-product games, there's a good argument the physical boxed product is a 'good,' but we don't know definitively if the software on it, or more generally software which is digitally distributed, is a good or a service. In the absence of a definitive legal answer, software and games companies have generally treated software itself as a service – which means treating games like World of Warcraft as well as platforms like Steam or Xbox LIVE as a service." The article continues, "The free-to-play business model is particularly interesting, because the providers of the game willingly relinquish direct profits in exchange for greater control over how players receive the game, play it, and eventually pay for it. This control isn't necessarily a bad thing either. It can help companies to better understand what gamers want from their games, and done properly such services can benefit both gamers and publishers. Of course, the emphasis here is on the phrase 'done properly.' Such control can easily be abused."


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We've had our say. You've had your say. But what about the people who made the games? What were their favourites of the year just ended? Yes, it's that time of year again, when we pester our favourite creators for their reflections and then watch them show us up with their witty and insightful explanations.

Read on to find out what the likes of BioShock developer Ken Levine, Lionhead founder Peter Molyneux, spaceship-loving Richard Garriott and Twisted Metal creator David Jaffe have to say, among many others. Thank you very much to everyone who took the time to contribute.

Dylan Cuthbert is founder of PixelJunk developer Q-Games, and one of the creators of Star Fox 64 3D.

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