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The source of an E. coli outbreak in Europe that has killed 22 people and sickened more than 2,200 is still not known. German authorities at first blamed it on cucumbers grown in Spain, causing outrage among Spanish farmers. They are claiming they lost tens of millions of dollars due to a slump in demand. Tests showed that Spanish cucumbers did not contain the dangerous strain. Bean sprouts from a farm in Germany are now being tested, though the first tests did not find the contamination. Cases have shown up in at least 10 countries and have left more than 600 in intensive care.(30 photos total)
A nurse cares for a patient infected with the virulent E. coli bacteria and undergoing dialysis treatment at an intensive care unit of Hamburg's UKE university clinic on June 1, 2011. The number of people sickened by a mysterious killer bacteria grew, two weeks after the outbreak in Germany, while fears over tainted vegetables hit European farmers hard. Scientists and health officials say they have identified the E. coli bacteria responsible for the outbreak, which has mainly affected northern Germany, but are unable to say what caused it or who was responsible. (Angelika Warmuth/AFP/Getty Images)

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Patrik Stollarz / AFP - Getty Images

A merry-go-round turns inside the cooling tower of the former nuclear power plant in Kalkar, western Germany, on May 28. The plant was constructed from 1977 to 1986. Now it has been converted to a leisure park and receives some 600,000 visitors a year.

Patrik Stollarz/ AFP - Getty Images

Visitors sit in a merry-go-round in front of the cooling tower of the former nuclear power plant in Kalkar, western Germany, near the border with the Netherlands, on May 28. The plant was constructed from 1977 to 1986, but was never operating as nuclear power plant.

Patrik Stollarz/ AFP - Getty Images

Visitors sit in a merry-go-round turning on the compound of the former nuclear power plant in Kalkar, western Germany, near the border with the Netherlands, on May 28. The plant was constructed from 1977 to 1986, but was never operating as nuclear power plant. Today, the plant, built at a cost of some 7 billion Deutsche Mark, was converted to a leisure fun park "Wunderland Kalkar" and receives some 600,000 visitors a year and employs about 550 people on the high season

The German government announced Monday that it would shut down all 17 of its nuclear power plants by 2022, which means that this incongruous sight could become the norm across the country.

Read an analysis of the German decision and the likelihood of other nations following suit.

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