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The time to enter the 25th annual National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest is running short -- entries will be accepted for another few days, until June 30, 2013. The first prize winner will receive a 10-day Galapagos expedition for two. National Geographic was once more kind enough to allow me to share some of the later entries with you here, gathered from four categories: Travel Portraits, Outdoor Scenes, Sense of Place, and Spontaneous Moments. Photos and captions by the photographers. Also, be sure to see Part 1, earlier on In Focus. [46 photos]

From the 'Sense of Place' category, a couple paddle out for a sunset surf in the coastal surfing town of Byron Bay, Australia. (© Ming Nomchong/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest)     

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Sean Gallagher

Think mobile devices are low-power? A study by the Center for Energy-Efficient Telecommunications—a joint effort between AT&T's Bell Labs and the University of Melbourne in Australia—finds that wireless networking infrastructure worldwide accounts for 10 times more power consumption than data centers worldwide. In total, it is responsible for 90 percent of the power usage by cloud infrastructure. And that consumption is growing fast.

The study was in part a rebuttal to a Greenpeace report that focused on the power consumption of data centers. "The energy consumption of wireless access dominates data center consumption by a significant margin," the authors of the CEET study wrote. One of the findings of the CEET researchers was that wired networks and data-center based applications could actually reduce overall computing energy consumption by allowing for less powerful client devices.

According to the CEET study, by 2015, wireless "cloud" infrastructure will consume as much as 43 terawatt-hours of electricity worldwide while generating 30 megatons of carbon dioxide. That's the equivalent of 4.9 million automobiles worth of carbon emissions. This projected power consumption is a 460 percent increase from the 9.2 TWh consumed by wireless infrastructure in 2012.

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The Brazilian Amazon, home to 60 percent of the world’s largest forest and 20 percent of the Earth’s oxygen, remains threatened by the rapid development of the country. The area is currently populated by over 20 million people and is challenged by deforestation, agriculture, mining, a governmental dam building spree, illegal land speculation including the [...]

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Mario Tama, a Getty Images staff photographer since 2001 and based in New York, has covered conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan - as well as numerous humanitarian crises and natural disasters in the US and around the world, including most recently the earthquake in Haiti and the tornadoes in Joplin, Missouri. He's also spent extensive time documenting Hurricane Katrina and it's aftermath. Mario will be working on several feature stories in Brazil, ahead of the Rio +20 UN Conference on Sustainable Energy, his first work featured in this post. The summit aims to overcome years of deadlock over environmental concerns and marks the 20th anniversary of the landmark Earth Summit in Rio in 1992. Brazil is now the world's sixth largest economy and is set to host the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics. Mario’s' editor on the project describes him as passionate and enthusiastic about showing us pieces of a country in which he has traveled before, drawn by the people, the culture and the economics/development of the region. -- Paula Nelson (48 photos total)
Federal highway BR-222, June 9, 2012 in Para state, Brazil. Highway construction through Amazonian rainforest has led to accelerated rates of deforestation. Although deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon is down 80 percent since 2004, environmentalists fear recent changes to the Forest Code will lead to further destruction. Around 20 percent of the rainforest has already been destroyed. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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In this week’s photos from around New York, dinosaurs are unloaded in New Jersey, handbell ensembles perform, activists release black balloons at an Apple store and more.

A model apatosaurus, left, and ankylosaurus, right, were unloaded from trailers Wednesday to be assembled and set in place at Field Station
A model apatosaurus, left, and ankylosaurus, right, were unloaded from trailers Wednesday to be assembled and set in place at Field Station: Dinosaurs in Secaucus, N.J. The dinosaur theme park is set to open in late May. (See related article.) (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal )


NASA’s 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, with space shuttle Enterprise mounted atop, flew up the Hudson River past the New York City skyline Friday on its way to JFK International Airport. (See related article.) (Timothy A. Clary/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)


Activists from Greenpeace released black balloons into the glass cube of the Apple store at Fifth Avenue near 58th Street on Tuesday to protest the absence of renewable energy fueling Apple’s cloud-based data storage service. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal )


Four handbell ensembles from New York and Virginia came together at Riverside Church on Sunday for the 34th Annual English Handbell Festival. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)


Ben Nguyen of Vietnam shook hands with U.S. Congressman Jose E. Serrano in an event organized by Citizenship and Immigration Services at a special Earth Day naturalization ceremony at the Bronx Zoo on Sunday. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


The lap pool in the basement of a newly built townhouse on East 74th Street. (See related article.) (Andrew Hinderaker for The Wall Street Journal)


Police on Monday wrapped up the excavation of a basement on Prince Street, where law enforcement officers had been looking for clues in the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz. (See related article.) (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


Police arrested a member of AIDS activist group ACT UP at Wall Street and Broadway, near the New York Stock Exchange, on Wednesday. AIDS activists joined supporters of the Occupy Wall Street movement in a march through lower Manhattan. (See related article.) (Brendan McDermid/Reuters)


A group of Occupy Wall Street protesters were evicted from a Lower Manhattan space that had served as an informal headquarters on Monday. Here, the group gathered their possessions on the sidewalk while they figured out where to move next. (See related article (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal )


Nine people were injured and several trees, street signs, and newspaper stands were damaged in a car crash at the northwest corner of Bryant Park late on Saturday. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)


Donette Skinner, right, 13, cried as she walked home in Harlem. One of her best friends, Annie Fryar, was shot and killed early on Tuesday. Police said Steven Murray fatally shot his teenage half-sister as she slept, turned the gun on his mother and then confronted police in a frenetic shootout on a nearby street. (See related article.) (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)

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Coal occupies a central position in modern human endeavors. Last year over 7000 megatons were mined worldwide. Powerful, yet dirty and dangerous, use of coal is expanding every year, with 2010 witnessing a production increase of 6.8%. Around 70 countries have recoverable reserves, which some estimates claim will last for over a hundred years at current production levels. Mining for coal is one of the world's most dangerous jobs. While deadliest in China, where thousands of miners die annually, the profession is still hazardous in the West and other regions as well. Our mining and use of coal accounts for a variety of environmental hazards, including the production of more CO2 than any other source. Other concerns include acid rain, groundwater contamination, respiratory issues, and the waste products which contain heavy metals. But our lives as lived today rely heavily on the combustible sedimentary rock. Over 40% of the world's electricity is generated by burning coal, more than from any other source. Chances are that a significant percentage of the electricity you're using to read this blog was generated by burning coal. Gathered here are images of coal extraction, transportation, and the impact on environment and society. The first eight photographs are by Getty photographer Daniel Berehulak, who documented the lives of miners in Jaintia Hills, India. -- Lane Turner (48 photos total)
22-year-old Shyam Rai from Nepal makes his way through tunnels inside of a coal mine 300 ft beneath the surface on April 13, 2011 near the village of Latyrke, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. In the Jaintia hills, located in India's far northeast state of Meghalaya, miners descend to great depths on slippery, rickety wooden ladders. Children and adults squeeze into rat hole like tunnels in thousands of privately owned and unregulated mines, extracting coal with their hands or primitive tools and no safety equipment. (Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

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According to projections by the United Nations, the world population has reached 7 billion and continues to grow rapidly.  While more people are living longer and healthier lives, gaps are widening between the rich and the poor in some nations and tens of millions of people are vulnerable to food and water shortages.  There is, of course, the issue of the impact of that sheer number on the environment, including pollution, waste disposal, use of natural resources and food production.  This post focuses on wheat and the effect of our numbers on the environment.  Wheat is the most important cereal in the world and along with rice and corn accounts for about 73 percent of all cereal production.  It isn't surprising that 7 billion people have a lasting impact on our world's natural resources and the environment in which we live. -- Paula Nelson (36 photos total)
One of the world's breadbaskets lies in the prairies of Canada. This stalk, near Lethbridge, Alberta, helps form the foundation for the most important food product in the world: cereal grains. (Todd Korol/Reuters)

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