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Why does it matter, if Invisible Children was funded by controversial donors? Two reasons – one, we can assume those donors thought IC aligned with their agenda – which is antagonistic to LGBT rights. Two, it fits an emerging pattern in which Invisible Children appears selectively concerned about crimes committed by Joseph Kony but indifferent to crimes, perhaps on a bigger scale, committed by their provisional partner, the government of Uganda – whose president shot his way into power using child soldiers, before Joseph Kony began using child soldiers. Like Kony, the government of Uganda was also indicted by the International Criminal Court in 2005, for human rights abuses and looting in the DRC Congo. Like Kony, the Ugandan army preys upon civilians and is currently accused, by Western human rights groups, with raping and looting in the DRC Congo, where it is hunting for Kony. In the late 1990s, Uganda helped spark a conflict in DRC Congo that, by the middle of the next decade it is estimated, had killed up to 5.4 million civilians, more than any conflict since World War Two.

http://blogs.alternet.org/speakeasy/2012/03/11/invisible-children-funded...

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One billion people worldwide live in slums, a number that will likely double by 2030. The characteristics of slum life vary greatly between geographic regions, but they are generally inhabited by the very poor or socially disadvantaged. Slum buildings can be simple shacks or permanent and well-maintained structures but lack clean water, electricity, sanitation and other basic services. In this post, I've included images from several slums including Kibera slum in Nairobi, Kenya, the second largest slum in Africa (and the third largest in the world); New Building slum in central Malabo, Equatorial Guinea; Pinheirinho slum - where residents recently resisted police efforts to forcibly evict them; and slum dwellers from Kolkata, Mumbai and New Delhi, India. India has about 93 million slum dwellers and as much as 50% of New Delhi's population is thought to live in slums, 60% of Mumbai. -- Paula Nelson (55 photos total)
Cambodian lawmaker Mu Sochuo, from the opposition Sam Rainsy party, pleads with riot policemen to stop a forced eviction of villagers at a slum village in the centre of Phnom Penh, Jan. 4, 2012. Cambodian lawmakers from the opposition Sam Rainsy party visited the village after authorities forcefully evicted villagers from the Borei Keila community in the capital. (Tang Chhin Sothy/AFP/Getty Images)

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It's been just over a month since the capture and death of Libyan dictator Moammar Khadafy, ending his 42-year reign. Since then, the rebels have declared that the nation is liberated, installed a transitional government, and started the process of writing a constitution. Still, substantial problems remain. Pockets of fighting have erupted among rival tribes and some rebels have refused to give up their cache of weapons. Doctors continue to struggle to treat the wounded and sick, with a few of the most severely injured being sent to rehabilitation centers in Boston and elsewhere. Last weekend, Khadafy’s son, Seif, was captured and could face war crimes for his part in the conflict. -- Lloyd Young (EDITOR'S NOTE: We will not post a Big Picture on Friday, November 25, due to the Thanksgiving Holiday.) (40 photos total)
Anti-Khadafy fighters acknowledge the crowd during a review of the brigades from the eastern region to commemorate the liberation of Quiche in Benghazi Oct. 27. (Esam Al-Fetori/Reuters)

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Rebels swept into the center of Tripoli over the weekend, and the end appeared to be inevitable for the 42-year reign of Moammar Khadafy as leader of Libya, but government forces were still putting up sporadic resistance in pockets of the city. The whereabouts of Khadafy were unknown. He is wanted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague for crimes against humanity. The six-month uprising had been marked by slow progress followed by setbacks, but moved with startling speed over the weekend. Gathered here are pictures from the last few days of the fighting and celebrations. -- Lane Turner (31 photos total)
Libyan rebel fighters celebrate as they drive through Tripoli's Qarqarsh district August 22, 2011. (Bob Strong/Reuters)

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I left Beirut midnight on Saturday and didn’t arrive to Helsinki until midday Sunday, so was way too tired to start doing blog updates yesterday. Besides, wanted to see some friends. But here is June’s fourth instalment of Photojournalism Links…

Features and Essays

Based on Facebook updates and hearing from friends it seems several photographers who were working in Libya in in March/April, are heading back there  this week…I wish them safe travels…looking forward to seeing their work….Feels like a second wave of coverage is coming…Rather fitting since International Criminal Court just issued an arrest warrant for Gaddafi..

Some of Moises Saman’s recent work from Tripoli on Magnum site… Includes black and white versions of some of the frames in last week’s NYT slideshow…

Moises Saman: NATO Campaign Against Gaddafi Regime (Magnum: June 2011)

Related to Libya conflict…

Alex Majoli: Dark Passage (Newsweek: June 2011) Arab Refugees Flow Into Europe

Ivor Prickett is one of the photographers heading back to Libya…Here is his beautiful Abkhazia work on Panos Pictures site, in case you missed it…

Ivor Prickett: Gali, Abkhazia – Left in Limbo (Panos: June 2011)

Finbarr O’Reilly: Shocking Clashes in Senegal (TIME: June 2011)

Sean Gallagher shot his first assignment for Newsweek…I’m sure there’ll be plenty more in the future…

Sean Gallagher: Next to the North Korean Border (Newsweek: June 2011)

Chad Ress: America Recovered (TIME LB: June 2011)

Danielle Levitt : The Kids are Alright: High Schoolers (TIME LB: June 2011)

Angelos Tzortzinis: Panic on the Streets of Athens (TIME LB: June 2011)

Conny Luhulima and Geert van Kesteren: Nunusaku (Foto8: June 2011)

Kacper Kowalski: Toxic Beauty (Panos: June 2011)

Leica released their M9-P… Alex Majoli did some work with the camera in Venice…

Alex Majoli: Venice (Leica-camera.com: June 2011)

Mishka Henner: In a Foreign Field (Panos: June 2011)

Dhruv Malhotra: Sleepers (TIME LB: June 2011)

Ashley Gilbertson: Ready to Eat (VII Mag: June 2011)

Susan Anderson: Beauty Speaks: Portraits of 31 Former Miss USA Pageant Queen (TIME LB: June 2011)

Heidi Warner: The Disappearance of the Borscht Belt Hotels (TIME LB: June 2011)

Maria Gruzdeva: Direction, Space! (Foto8: June 2011)

Interviews

Lynsey Addario (Marie Claire: June 2011)

Sebastian Meyer : Photographing Libya’s Violent Conflict (BBC: June 2011)

Lauren Greenfield (Stockland Martel blog: June 2011)

Was reading the National Geographic Magazine’s July issue during my travel yesterday…Great to see Addario’s Baghdad work in print, the one I was praising in last week’s post… The issue includes also some of Michael Christopher Brown’s Libya Hipstas..Empas.is did an interview with him…

Michael Christopher Brown : Going beyond the frontline: Michael C. Brown returns to Libya (Emphas.is: June 2011)

Todd Heisler : A Father’s Voice, Through Kodachrome (NYT Lens: June 2011)

Janine di Giovanni : ‘I believed I had escaped trauma… but I was not as unbroken as I thought’  (Guardian: June 2011) War correspondent Janine di Giovanni saw death and trauma on a scale unimaginable to most of us. She thought she was immune to fear. But, as her compelling memoir reveals, when she and her husband finally put war behind them to start a family, the past came back to shatter their lives…

Alex Majoli (Leica-camera.com: June 2011)

Sean Gallagher (1416.me: June 2011)

Ed Kashi (Youtube)

Karim Ben Khelifa (takepart.com: June 2011) ”The World is Changing, Change With It”

Laura El Tantawy (Sojournposse: June 2011)

Tim and Noah Hussin (Thedigitalnaturalist.com: June 2011) Tim and Noah Hussin about their documentary journey called America ReCycled

Andrew Burton (NYT Lens: June 2011)

Articles

NPPA: History Is Made: Press Photographer Covers Live Presidential Speech (NPPA: June 2011)

! BJP: Street photography subject of second Firecracker event (BJP: June 2011)

photo: Gona Aziz

TIME LB: Iraq Through Iraqi Eyes (TIME LB: June 2011)

TIME LB: Facing Change Collective and the Library of Congress to Cooperate (TIME LB: June 2011)

Bill Kramer: Real World Estimates – Magazine Contract (A Photo Editor: June 2011)

BJP: The future of photography? Kadir van Lohuizen’s launches an iPad app of his journey up the Pan-American Highway (BJP: June 2011)

David Campbell: Debating ‘Who’s afraid of home?’, and the importance of narrative (DC Blog: June 2011)

Jeremy Nicholl: “Jay Maisel Is A Dick”: Freetard Mob Savages Octogenarian Photographer Over Copyright (Photographer’s blog: June 2011)

Jeremy Nicholl: 10 Reasons This Isn’t The Greatest Photo Ever (Photographer’s blog: June 2011)

Leica camera: M9-P in Venice: The Making of (Vimeo) Magnum photographer Alex Majoli took the new Leica M9-P on a journey through Venice. Alex Majoli accompanied one of the around 700 gondolieri for several days and captured a sensitive portrait of the gondolier and his city. Here is a behind the scenes view of Alex’s journey through Venice.

Travel Photographers: Upgrade To The New Leica M9-P For Just $0.25 (TP: June 2011)

Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Luis Robayo (Guardian: June 2011) Luis Robayo is an Agence France-Presse photographer based in Colombia. In this set of photographs he documents Brother Hermes, an exorcist in the Valle del Cauca

Allthingsd.com: Meet the Stealthy Start-Up That Aims to Sharpen Focus of Entire Camera Industry (allthingsd.com: June 2011)

NYT: In Hours, Online Readers Identify Nazi Photographer (NYT: June 2011)

PDN: Benefiting from Portfolio Reviews: How To Stay In Touch (PDN: June 2011)

Telegraph: Photography Sites of the Week (Telegraph: June 2011)

Guardian Eyewitness: Andrew McConnell: Kinshasa strings (Guardian: June 2011) Photographs from the Guardian Eyewitness series

PhotoShelter Guide: The Photographer’s guide to selling like a pro (PS: June 2011)

Lisa Pritchard: Ask an Agent (LPA blog: June 2011)

Absolutely must see! Congratulations to Panos Pictures for their 25th anniversary!

Videos – Panos Pictures: Conversations in Photography: 25 years of Panos Pictures (Panos: June 2011)

Developing Pictures blog: Panos 25 Years (Developing pictures blog: June 2011)

Crowd funding – Erin Trieb : The Homecoming Project (Kickstarter)

PhotographersFabio Bucciarelli

ServicesMetro Print

AgenciesMagnum Photos AGM decisions from BJP

EventsFoto8 Summershow 2011 Launch Party : 8 July : London : £10/£15

Awards

Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize : Deadline 7 July

photo: Alex Masi

Getty Images announces Grants for Good winners (BJP: June 2011) Photographers Alex Masi and Gwenn Dubourthoumieu have won this year’s Grants for Good, which will see them receive $15,000 each for the production of new imagery to support non-profit organisations of their choosing | Same from PDN

The France 24-RFI Web Documentary Award (BJP: June 2011)

Jing Huang – winner of the Leica Oskar Barnack Newcomer Award for his portfolio ‘Pure of Sight’

TwitterKevin van Paassen

TwitterDEVELOP Photo

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David R Arnott writes

Former Bosnian Serb military commander Ratko Mladic appeared before a court in The Hague Friday to hear charges of genocide. Follow the latest developments in the case here, and read a story from a survivor of Bosnia's killing fields here. In the wake of Mladic's arrest, Reuters photographer Damir Sagolj, who served in the Bosnian army during the war of 1992-95, recounted his personal recollections of working in Srebrenica:

"I've been to more than one hundred mass graves, mass funerals and witnessed the long, exhaustive process of victim 
identification. I've taken pictures of bones found in caves and rivers, dug from mud, recovered from woods and mines or 
just left by the road.

"Most of these terrible assignments were around the small, end-of-the-road town of Srebrenica in eastern Bosnia.

Damir Sagolj / Reuters, file

One of hundreds of coffins with remains of Bosnian Muslims is taken to a cemetery near Srebrenica, late July 10, 2007. The mass burial of 465 victims of the 1995 massacre of up to 8,000 Muslim men and boys by Bosnian Serb forces was held the following day at a joint cemetery near Srebrenica.

"The international criminal court says that a genocide was committed in Srebrenica in July of 1995 when Bosnian Serb forces massacred thousands of Muslims after the enclave, ironically under U.N. protection as a safe haven, was overrun by an army led by its ruthless commander.

"Ratko Mladic, a typical officer from what used to be the Yugoslav people's army, was the commander of the forces that overran the enclave. He described it as revenge upon the Turks for the events of the early 19th century. Thousands of white Muslim gravestones at the terrifying and extremely sad Srebrenica memorial remain as a symbol of that 'revenge'. Thousands are still missing, their bones hidden in heavy Bosnian soil.

Damir Sagolj / Reuters, file

A woman holds a photo of her missing son as Bosnian Muslim relatives of the victims and survivors of the Srebrenica massacre meet with ex-Dutch peacekeepers in a former U.N base in Potocari on October 17, 2007. A group of Dutch ex-peacekeepers whose mission was to protect civilians in the U.N. safe haven of Srebrenica visited the site and met with survivors and relatives of victims.

"I was in Sarajevo when the news came to us, transmitted over a noisy, primitive radio system. Local reporters from Srebrenica - who would disappear themselves over the next few days - sent the dramatic message that Ratko's troops were entering the town. We all knew it was going to be bad, but still I had no idea of the scale of the tragedy. Yes, the enclave had fallen, but the U.N. were there, so the civilians and prisoners of war should be treated in accordance with the Geneva conventions. How wrong and naive I was!

Damir Sagolj / Reuters, file

A destroyed house is seen from inside a car on December 20, 2007 near the site where the Srebrenica massacre occurred.

"I have never seen Ratko Mladic, I never photographed him, but his bloody signature is written all over my pictures. Every time I would go to another mass grave or a mass funeral of victims of his 'revenge', the face of a man confident he is doing the right thing would come into the frame. Sleeves rolled up, binoculars in his hands as he ordered his artillery 'Don't let them sleep. Make them lose their minds.'

"I will carry the mud from mass graves and the smell of decomposing bodies on my shoes wherever I go. I will continue shooting my Srebrenica pictures on every story of crimes against humanity no matter how far away and how different they may be.

Damir Sagolj / Reuters, file

Bosnian Muslim returnees to Srebrenica arrive for morning prayers on the first day of Eid al-Adha celebrations, December 20, 2007.

"Last week, after more than 15 years on the run, Ratko Mladic was captured in a small village in Serbia. Looking at the pictures of an old man emerging from a Belgrade court – Mladic is almost seventy now – sends chills down my spine. I'm not even sure I want to see him any more, to hear what he has to say. His words from back then were enough, there is not much else to say.

"All that is important can be understood from the pictures – a sea of coffins lined up for the funeral every 11th of July, a wrinkled face of a woman, the only survivor in her family, as she holds a photo of her dead son, bones bulldozed in the mass graves, the names on the memorial…

Damir Sagolj / Reuters, file

A Bosnian Muslim man searches for the name of a killed relative amongst gravestones of victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, following morning prayers on the first day of Eid al-Fitr in Srebrenica on October 12, 2007.

"Covering a story like this is not an easy thing to do, no matter how big and important it is. Fifteen years of the same – one could ask 'Does anyone care anymore? How many times can the same story be written?'

"The threshold was raised as the years passed and questions were asked – How many at this mass grave, is it over one hundred? Anything special? A baby skull with a bullet hole, maybe a body impaled on the stake? Only thirty bodies?

"As I went from one atrocity site to another Mladic was still in hiding, raising questions that made my head hurt like hell. He would only appear from time to time on the posters or T-shirts of his supporters – there are people still calling him a hero. That is where reality bites and the pictures get scary – ghosts of victims dancing between white grave marks in our photos are harmless.

Damir Sagolj / Reuters, file

Bosnian Muslim women look through the bars as U.N. chief war crimes prosecutor Carla del Ponte arrives for a mass funeral at a cemetery near Srebrenica on July 11, 2007. Families of victims of the Srebrenica massacre gathered to bury more remains in an annual ceremony that has become the main event of their lives since the 1995 atrocity by Bosnian Serb forces.

"The general is in custody now, but, just like these pictures, his 'revenge' remains imprinted in the sad history of a beautiful country.

"Some of the best advice I've ever heard in our profession was to take every assignment as if it had never been done before and
you were the only one to witness it. No matter what year it was – 1995 or 2005 – every time I went to Srebrenica, I had the feeling that I was doing something more that just a regular story.

It is, simply, the biggest story of my life."

Damir Sagolj / Reuters, file

A flower is placed onto the names of the Srebrenica victims as relatives visit their memorial in Potocari, near Srebrenica on October 16, 2007.

 

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