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Original author: 
Casey Johnston

Casey Johnston

Aereo, a service that streams over-the-air channels to its subscribers, has now spent more than a year serving residents of New York City. The service officially expands to Boston tomorrow and is coming to many more cities over the next few months, including Atlanta and Washington, DC. Aereo seems like a net-add for consumers, and the opposition has, so far, failed to mount a defense that sticks.

But the simple idea behind Aereo is so brilliant and precariously positioned that it seems like we need to simultaneously enjoy it as hard as we can and not at all. We have to appreciate it for exactly what it is, when it is, and expect nothing more. It seems so good that it cannot last. And tragically, there are more than a few reasons why it may not.

A little about how Aereo works: as a resident of the United States, you have access to a handful of TV channels broadcast over the air that you can watch for free with an antenna (or, two antennas, but we’ll get to that). A subscription to Aereo gets you, literally, your very own tiny antenna offsite in Aereo’s warehouse. The company streams this to you and attaches it to a DVR service, allowing you both live- and time-shifted viewing experiences.

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The Women's Initiative:

In every country in the world, women are being abused, trafficked, bartered, sold, burned by fire and acid and killed, sometimes by their own families, for “honor” or anger.
 
The Alexia Foundation, recognizing that most of the time abuse of women in the United States is hidden, rationalized, ignored, and sometimes worst of all, quietly accepted by the women being abused, has created a grant to provide resources for a photojournalist to produce a project that illuminates any form of abuse of women in the United States but with global significance.
 
The Alexia Foundation’s main purpose is to encourage and help photojournalists create stories that drive change. While our traditional grant guidelines put no limits on the subject matter for grant proposals, a few proposals about women’s rights in the last few years have been so powerful that they have compelled the Foundation to create a grant specifically on the issue of women’s abuse.  Because this issue is so shocking and deplorable – but continues partly because it is so often unseen or ignored – the Foundation will provide a $25,000 grant so a project can be produced that will illuminate the horrors of what is happening, often invisibly in our own communities.

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Opening at the Half King in New York: Antonio Bolfo - IMPACT: Life on the Housing Beat

‘We were as green as could be, and like other Impact officers I hit the ground running with little to no knowledge of how to operate on the street.  Yet we were expected to  …  solve family disputes, console the parents of murdered children, and entertain the neighborhood drunk.’

- Antonio Bolfo

New York, NY — On July 24th, Antonio Bolfo’s photo exhibit of rookie police officers charged with patrolling a South Bronx housing project will open at The Half King. Bolfo undertook this photo project as an NYPD insider—for two years he worked in a police program called Operation Impact. With only six months of academic training, he and his confederates had to conduct manhunts, defend the helpless, and supply emotional succor to victims of violence.

On opening night, Antonio and Ed Conlon, former NYPD detective and author of Blue Blood, will moderate a slideshow and discussion of Antonio’s work.

The Half King - 505 West 23rd Street, NY, NY 10011    

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I write to announce that Eugene Richards will be leaving Reportage and Getty Images forthwith.

All of us at Reportage have been both honoured and privileged to work with Gene these past 3 years but we have mutually agreed that Getty Images is no longer the right fit for Gene and as a result he will be moving on.

We wish Gene and Janine every happiness and success for the future.

On a personal note Gene and I will remain close friends and I look forward to meeting with him regularly to discuss the industry , projects and which wine to choose for dinner.

Aidan J Sullivan
Vice President Photo Assignment,

Editorial Partnerships and Development
Getty Images

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Last night we hosted a presentation and discussion at Frontline Club in London between Tom Stoddart, Peter Dench, and Aidan Sullivan.  Here is the full video (yes, it’s 90 minutes long, but worth it!).

Dench: I grew up where books mattered.  As a photographer, the holy grail for me was, in 1990, a book and an exhibition.

Stoddart: It still is, even more so, because you’re not going to get 20 pages in the Sunday Times Magazine…photographers have to find different ways of getting their work in front of people…the number one thing is to be in the industry and find ways of getting your work out there that people want to see, no matter how you do it.

Dench: I call it “diversify or die.”

There’s a nice write-up about the event posted on the Frontline Club blog.

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