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samzenpus

chicksdaddy writes "Noted hacker and innovator Peiter 'Mudge' Zatko, a project manager for cyber security research at DARPA for the past three years- will be setting up shop in the Googleplex, according to a post on his Twitter feed on Friday. Zatko, who earned fame as a founding member of the early 1990s Boston-area hacker confab The L0pht and later as a division scientist at government contractor BBN Technologies, announced his departure from DARPA following a three-year stint as a Program Manager in DARPA's Information Innovation Office on Friday. 'Given what we all pulled off within the USG, let's see if it can be done even better from outside. Goodbye DARPA, hello Google!' he Tweeted."

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Science Should Be a Story: Tyler DeWitt at TEDxBeaconStreet

When new friends tell Tyler DeWitt that they hated science classes in school, he doesn't blame them. In this video, Tyler discusses how modern science education has taken a fascinating subject filled with riveting stories, colorful characters, and spectacular demonstrations, and has eviscerated it of its joy, excitement, and intellectual engagement. Science communication should be a narrative, he argues, that draws on analogies, metaphors, humor, and emotional connection. Tyler puts these ideas into action by telling a fun, intriguing story that explains the complex means by which viruses attack their targets. He urges fellow scientists to dispense with jargon, seriousness, and tyrannical technical precision, and to focus on communicating their main ideas through appealing narratives. Tyler DeWitt has taught high school Biology, Chemistry, and English in independent schools in the United States and South Korea, and he has worked as a project manager to develop new K12 science curriculum for the state of Florida. Tyler is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Microbiology at MIT. He has served as a fellow with the Education Foundation of America's Teaching for Experience program, and at MIT he is a National Science Foundation Fellow and a Graduate Resident Tutor. In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep <b>...</b>
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Lucien Vattel: Unboxing Education Through Gaming, Playing, and Making

Trailblazing education and game development visionary Lucien Vattel is at the forefront of a nationwide crusade to revolutionize learning in the classroom and beyond. As the CEO of the Los Angeles-based interactive curriculum creator and digital publisher GameDesk, Vattel is transforming the traditional school model into a hands-on, digitally-charged ecosystem for students to discover and nourish their greatest gifts, while embracing STEM skills through game-based learning. Founded to help at-risk students in low-income regions tap deeply into their intelligence and talents, GameDesk instills the value of learning through play, and empowers students to collaborate and be active producers of the content from which they learn. Building upon this methodology, Vattel founded PlayMaker, a next-generation, choose-your-own adventure middle school program designed to help teachers and students transcend the confines of textbooks and chalk boards. This is just the beginning of the GameDesk insurgence. Vattel recently secured the largest contribution in AT&T history to develop a national digital learning center and fully comprehensive online portal for educators. During the last 15 years, Vattel has spearheaded a variety of educational projects funded by the National Science Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Lockheed Martin, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Motorola, Sandia Labs, National Academies of Science, and others. Previously, Vattel co-founded and <b>...</b>
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TEDxTalks
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8
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Time:
19:30
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Digital Deceit: Jeff Hancock at TEDxWinnipeg

Digital Deceit: Jeff Hancock at TEDxWinnipeg 2012 Deception is one of the most significant and pervasive social phenomena of our age. On average, people tell one to two lies a day, and these lies range from the trivial to the more serious, including deception between friends and family, in the workplace, and in politics. At the same time, information and communication technologies have pervaded almost all aspects of human communication and interaction, from everyday technologies that support interpersonal interactions, such as email and instant messaging, to more sophisticated systems that support organizational interactions. Jeff Hancock is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Communication and Information Science, and co-Director of Cognitive Science at Cornell University. He is currently Chair of the Information Science Department. His work is concerned with understanding they psychological and linguistic aspects of social media, with a particular emphasis on deception, identity, social interaction, and the psychological effects of online interaction. His research is supported by funding from the National Science Foundation and the Department of Defense, and his work on lying online has been featured in the New York Times, CNN, CBC, NPR, BBC and the CBC documentary The Truth About Lying. Dr. Hancock earned his PhD in Psychology at Dalhousie University, Canada, and joined Cornell in 2002. In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self <b>...</b>
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18:35
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Michael Fassbender in Prometheus.

It's no secret that science and the entertainment industry aren't always the best of bedfellows. Back in 2009, I reported from that year's AAAS meeting on NSF's program to encourage responsible science in Hollywood. Then, the message was clear. Hollywood is interested in telling a story, and if scientific accuracy gets in the way, well, it's getting run right over. But after finally seeing Prometheus this past weekend, I've come to realize that the industry's contempt for even vaguely plausible science all-but-guarantees I won't be able to suspend my disbelief. And it doesn't have to be like this.

Warning: spoilers will follow.

My problems with the film began almost immediately. A Lord of the Rings-inspired panoramic landscape gives way to a humanoid standing by a waterfall. He drinks some black goop, and then his DNA begins to fall apart, followed quickly by the rest of him. This mess all dissolves into the river, et voilà—the implication is that humans arose because of this. Just five minutes in and my brain is already beginning to push back against this dreck.

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