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North Korean government

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‘NO PRESSURE’
‘NO PRESSURE’: Xochitl, 3, a Mexican hairless dog, waited for owner Ana Poe of San Francisco in a restroom at the America’s Family Pet Expo in Costa Mesa, Calif., Thursday. (Cindy Yamanaka/The Orange County Register/Zuma Press)

READY TO LEARN
READY TO LEARN: Students Kadidiatu Swaray, 18, left, and Mabinty Bangura, 15, arrived for class at the Every Nation Academy private school in Makeni, Sierra Leone, Friday. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

OFFENDED
OFFENDED: North Koreans shouted slogans denouncing South Korean President Lee Myung-bak during a rally Friday at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang. The North Korean government has said Mr. Lee’s recent comments about the country ‘hurt the dignity’ of its people. (Vincent Yu/Associated Press)

IN PAIN
IN PAIN: A homeless young woman accused of having premarital sex in public was caned by a sharia police officer at a public square in the town of Langsa, Indonesia, Friday. Aceh is the only Indonesian province that enforces laws based in the teachings of Islam. (Riza Lazuardi/AFP/Getty Images)

TAKING A BREATHER
TAKING A BREATHER: Stanislas Wawrinka of Switzerland caught his breath during his quarterfinal match against Spain’s Rafael Nadal in the Monte Carlo Tennis Masters tournament in Monaco, Friday. (Lionel Cironneau/Associated Press)

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North Korea has long been enigmatic - especially to the West.  An elaborate cult of personality created around the ruling Kim family permeates both the cultural and political lives of the nation. The world's most militarized nation, it has been developing nuclear weapons and a space program.  In 2002, President George Bush labeled North Korea part of an "axis of evil," primarily due to its aggressive military posture but also because of its abysmal human rights record.   North Korea has long maintained close relations with the People's Republic of China and Russia.  In an attempt to ameliorate the loss of investments due to international sanctions over its weapons program, North Korean officials have initiated a tourism push, focused on Chinese visitors.  Still, every travel group or individual visitor is constantly accompanied by one or two "guides" who normally speak the mother language of the tourist.  While some tourism has increased over the last few years, Western visitors remain scarce.  The last several photos in this post are by Associated Press photographer David Guttenfelder, who offers rare glimpses of life in the shuttered country. -- Paula Nelson (54 photos total)
Rolling out the red carpet for tourists is not commonly associated with the reclusive North Korean government, but that is what workers did for the departure ceremony of Mangyongbyong cruise ship in Rason City on Aug. 30. About 130 passengers departed the rundown port of Rajin, near the China-Russia border, for the scenic Mount Kumgang resort near South Korea. North Korea's state tourism bureau has teamed up with a Chinese travel company to run the country's first ever cruise. (Carlos Barria/Reuters)

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