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Original author: 
timothy

coondoggie writes "At the Design Automation Conference (DAC) here this week, John Kubiatowicz, professor in the UC Berkeley computer science division, offered a preview of Tessellation, describing it as an operating system for the future where surfaces with sensors, such as walls and tables in rooms, for example, could be utilized via touch or audio command to summon up multimedia and other applications. The UC Berkeley Tessellation website says Tessellation is targeted at existing and future so-called 'manycore' based systems that have large numbers of processors, or cores on a single chip. Currently, the operating system runs on Intel multicore hardware as well as the Research Accelerator for Multiple Processors (RAMP) multicore emulation platform."

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Original author: 
Nathan Ingraham

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There's little doubt that the traditional password is in danger of being replaced — much has been written about its vulnerabilities and flaws, and organizations like DARPA and Google are hard at work looking for alternatives. Biometric sensors like the fingerprint scanner are one options, but some students and researchers from UC Berkeley are taking a more mental than physical approach to security. Using an off-the-shelf, consumer-oriented headset with a built-in electroencephalogram (EEG), the team developed a way for users to log in and authenticate their identities using only their brain waves.

The impetus for this project came from the availability of low-cost EEG sensors — while researchers have long proposed using EEGs to...

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Closing the Loop between the Brain and Education: Dr. Adam Gazzaley at TEDxASB

Dr. Adam Gazzaley obtained an MD and a Ph.D. in Neuroscience at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, completed clinical residency in Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania, and postdoctoral training in cognitive neuroscience at UC Berkeley. He is the founding director of the Neuroscience Imaging Center at the UC San Francisco, an Associate Professor in Neurology, Physiology and Psychiatry, and Principal Investigator of a cognitive neuroscience laboratory. His laboratory studies neural mechanisms of perception, attention and memory, with an emphasis on the impact of distraction and multitasking on these abilities. His unique research approach utilizes a powerful combination of human neurophysiological tools, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)). In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
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Leaders in Big Data

Google Tech Talk October 22, 2012 ABSTRACT Discussing the evolution, current opportunities and future trends in big data Presented by Google and the Fung Institute at UC Berkeley SPEAKERS: Moderator: Hal Varian, an economist specializing in microeconomics and information economics. He is the Chief Economist at Google and he holds the title of emeritus professor at the University of California, Berkeley where he was founding dean of the School of Information. Panelists: Theo Vassilakis, Principal Engineer/Engineering Director at Google Gustav Horn, Senior Global Consulting Engineer, Hadoop at NetApp Charles Fan, Senior Vice President at VMware in strategic R&D
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Socio-PLT: Quantitative and Social Theories for Programming Language Adoption

Google Tech Talk November 14, 2012 Presented by Leo A. Meyerovich ABSTRACT Why do some programming languages succeed and others fail? We have been tackling this basic question in two ways: First, I will discuss theories from the social sciences about the adoption process and what that means for designing new languages. For example, the Haskell and type systems communities may be suffering some of the same challenges that the public health community did for safe sex advocacy in the early nineties. Second, informed by these studies, we gathered and quantitatively analyzed several large datasets, including over 200000 SourceForge projects and multiple surveys of 1000-13000 programmers. We find that social factors usually outweigh intrinsic technical ones. In fact, the larger the organization, the more important social factors become. I'll report on additional surprises about the popularity, perception, and learning of programming languages. Taken together, our results help explain the process by which languages become adopted or not. Speaker Info: Leo A. Meyerovich is a Ph.D. candidate at UC Berkeley researching browser parallelization, the Superconductor language for visualizing big data, and language adoption. Earlier, he worked on security extensions for JavaScript and the Flapjax language for functional reactive web programming (www.flapjax-lang.org).
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TEDxJaffa -- Professor Dorit Aharonov -- Using the scientific method for self-improvement

Professor Dorit Aharonov will talk about the ways she discovered to use scientific methods of inquiry to learn about herself and foment change in her daily life. By combining body study and movement with scientific discovery, she suggests ways to adjust our lives for the better with a scientific bent. Dorit was born in Washington DC and grew up in Haifa, Israel. She did her BSc in Physics and Mathematics summa cum laude in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where she continued to do her PhD (after a break of one year at the Weizmann Institute), jointly in the Computer science and Physics departments. In her PhD she discovered ways to make quantum computers noise tolerant. After a one year postdoc in the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton and one year in UC Berkeley, she joined the Hebrew University computer science department where she is now a full professor, and together with her group of students studies quantum computational processes. More generally, she is fascinated by mathematical beauty and its connection to the physical world. She received several awards for her research work. Her other passion is body-mind processes, and in particular, martial arts. For the past 18 years she has been practicing and studying Tai-Chi, Yoga and Kung-Fu, and in addition has recently become a teacher in the Feldenkreiz method of self improvement and awareness through movement. Other interests of hers include human rights, art, literature, being outdoors, hiking, inspiring <b>...</b>
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Carat: Collaborative Energy Debugging

Google Tech Talk September 27, 2012 Presented by Adam Oliner. ABSTRACT We aim to detect and diagnose code misbehavior that wastes energy, which we call energy bugs. This talk describes a method for performing such diagnosis on mobile devices and an implementation, called Carat, for iOS and Android. Carat takes a collaborative, black-box approach. A non-invasive client app sends intermittent, coarse-grained measurements to a server, which identifies correlations between higher expected energy use and client properties like the running apps, device model, and operating system. Carat successfully detected all energy bugs in a controlled experiment and, during a deployment to a community of more than a quarter of a million users, detected (and sometimes diagnosed) thousands of instances of buggy apps running in the wild. About the speaker: Adam Oliner Adam is a postdoc in the EECS Department at UC Berkeley, working in the AMP Lab. Before coming to Berkeley, he earned PhD in computer science from Stanford University, where he was a DOE High Performance Computer Science Fellow and Honorary Stanford Graduate Fellow. Adam received a MEng in EECS from MIT, where he also earned undergraduate degrees in computer science and mathematics. His research focuses on understanding complex systems.
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Scott Jones

Oracle v. Google

A few minutes after the Oracle v. Google verdict, the ten jurors filed out to the elevator. A group of several reporters, including me, had hunkered down close to the elevators to wait for the jury as they walked out. Several Oracle lawyers stood farther back, also eager to hear from the ten men and women who had dealt their side a major setback.

A court security guard, who had been outside the jury room throughout deliberations, walked the jurors straight to the elevator, saying the jurors didn't want to talk to anyone. That wasn't quite true. The foreman of the jury, Greg Thompson, stopped and answered reporters' questions for about twenty minutes, while Oracle lawyers listened quietly to his answers.

Thompson's brief chat with reporters revealed that the jury had a strong pro-Google bent during both the patent phase, which Google won, and the copyright phase, which ended with a split verdict.

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