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United States Army

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Work seen at Photolucida

Pasab ©Dima Gavrysh


Dima Gavrysh just celebrated the birth of his first child, a wonderful milestone after years of focusing his lens on the difficult subject matter of war.  He has approached this subject in a variety of mediums and produced a number of compelling series in collaboration with charitable organizations such as Doctors Without Borders.  Dima has also been embedded with the US Army in Afghanistan numerous times creating projects such as Soldiers of Zerok and  Inshallah (which went on to receive Top 50 honors in Critical Mass , 2010).  The body of work that he brought to Photolucida was all captured in stunning black and white using a mobile phone.  Dima has a remarkable ability to capture the tension and charged experience of war with an artist's eye. 

Dima received his
MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in June 2012.
He obtained his first degree in Kiev, Ukraine in 2000 as a Director of
Photography in Motion Picture Imaging. For the past 12
years Dima has worked as a documentary photographer with major publications and
news agencies such as New York Times, Associated Press, and Bloomberg News. Dima was been the recipient of numerous awards and recently has a solo exhibition of this work at the Pictura Gallery. He is currently working on publishing his first book.


Inshallah
Inshallah (God willing in Arabic) is a project that explores the Soviet and American occupations of Afghanistan, and draws on my childhood fantasies that romanticize the military and intertwine with my past and present personal conflicts.

Zerok #1©Dima Gavrysh


As a Ukrainian who was born and raised in the former Soviet Union, this is the
second time that I live in a country that is fighting a war in Afghanistan.

Ambush ©Dima Gavrysh


I create a dark fairytale filled with my fears and dreams, based on my fascination with the army’s strength and order, set on the front lines of what has become America’s longest running war in history. Mesmerized by the complexity of the Afghan chaos, I strive to better comprehend my personal relationship to these wars: two empires, two mentalities, same battlefield, twelve years apart.

 Finch ©Dima Gavrysh

IED ©Dima Gavrysh

 Suicide Bomber ©Dima Gavrysh

Khost #3 ©Dima Gavrysh

 Larry ©Dima Gavrysh

EOD ©Dima Gavrysh

Tangi #2 ©Dima Gavrysh

Kandahar #2 ©Dima Gavrysh

 Paktika #2©Dima Gavrysh

 Brothers ©Dima Gavrysh

August 12th ©Dima Gavrysh

 Paktia #1 @©Dima Gavrysh

Kandahar #1 ©Dima Gavrysh

Zerok#2 ©Dima Gavrysh

Khost #2 ©Dima Gavrysh

Air Assault #2 ©Dima Gavrysh

Concussion Dust ©Dima Gavrysh

BAF ©Dima Gavrysh

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Researchers have developed a computational model that can predict video game players’ in-game performance and provide a corresponding challenge they can beat, leading to quicker mastery of new skills. The advance not only could help improve user experiences with video games but also applications beyond the gaming world.

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Charlie Haughey was drafted into the US Army in October of 1967. He was 24, and had been in college in Michigan before running out of money and quitting school to work in a sheet metal factory. The draft notice meant that he was to serve a tour of duty in Vietnam, designated a rifleman, the basic field position in the Army. After 63 days in Vietnam, he was made a photographer, shooting photographs for the Army and US newspapers, with these instructions from the Colonel: “You are not a combat photographer. This is a morale operation. If I see pictures of my guys in papers, doing their jobs with honor, then you can do what you like in Vietnam.” He shot nearly 2,000 images between March 1968 and May 1969 before taking the negatives home. And there they sat, out of sight, but not out of mind, for 45 years, until a chance meeting brought them out of dormancy and into a digital scanner. At first, it was very difficult for Haughey to view the images and talk about them, especially not knowing the fates of many of the subjects of his photos. When the digitization hit 1,700 negative scans, Haughey put them on a slideshow and viewed them all at once, and didn’t sleep for three days after. He’s slowly getting better at dealing with the emotional impact of seeing the images for the first time in decades. A team of volunteers has worked with Haughey to plan a 28-image show, titled A Weather Walked In, which opens April 5th in the ADX art gallery in Portland, Oregon. The difficulty of keeping notes in a war zone along with the passage of decades has faded the details behind many of the images, and the captions reflect this fact, with many shots of unknown people in forgotten locations at unspecified times. It is hoped that publication of the pictures can yield more information. More images from the collection will be released as the project progresses. You can follow the progress on facebook and Tumblr. Thanks to Chieu Hoi project volunteer Kris Regentin for preparing much of this introduction and the accompanying captions. -- Lane Turner (46 photos total)
Bowed head in truck: Soldier and location unidentified. Charlie's first response to this photo: "It was not uncommon to find anyone with a head bowed for a moment, more often when we were heading out than when we were coming back. Interesting that he has a flak jacket, he's taking precautions on both sides of the fence. M16, a steel pot, a flak jacket, and a prayer."

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The second collection of images from 2012 once again brought us nature at its full force and beauty along with news and daily life coming from countries like Russia, Syria, Egypt, England, India and Italy. The following is a compilation - not meant to be comprehensive in any way - of images from the second 4 months of 2012. Please see part 1 from Monday and here's part 3. -- Lloyd Young ( 47 photos total)
Tightrope walker Nik Wallenda walks the high wire from the United States side to the Canadian side over the Horseshoe Falls in Niagara Falls, Ontario, on June 15. (Mark Blinch/Reuters)

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