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00_NOP writes "Researchers from the New School for Social Research in New York have demonstrated that if you read quality literary fiction you become a better person, in the sense that you are more likely to empathize with others [paper abstract]. Presumably we can all think of books that have changed the way we feel about the world — so this is, in a sense, a scientific confirmation of something fairly intuitive."

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An anonymous reader writes "Have the storytelling capabilities of the two already met? A New Yorker interview with Gears of War 4 writer Tom Bissell explores the question. Bissell says, 'More and more, I’m seeing that games are mining good, old-fashioned human anxieties for their drama, and that’s really promising. Games, more and more, are not just about shooting and fighting, and for that reason I’m optimistic and heartened about where the medium is heading, because I think game designers are getting more interested in making games that explore what it means to be alive. ... At the same time, though, pure storytelling is never going to be the thing that games do better than anything. Games are primarily about a connection between the player, the game world, and the central mechanic of the game. They’re about creating a space for the player to engage with that mechanic and have the world react in a way that feels interesting and absorbing but also creates a sense of agency. So writing, in games, is about creating mood and establishing a basic sense of intent. The player has some vague notion of what the intent of the so-called author is, but the power of authorship is ultimately for the player to seize for him or herself.'"

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GTAC 2010: Lessons Learned from Testability Failures

Google Test Automation Conference 2010 October 28-29, 2010 "Lessons Learned from Testability Failures" Presented by Esteban Manchado Velázquez, Opera Software ASA. Often, QA staff focus on the testing itself. However, ensuring a good level of testability is crucial for project quality. For the sake of discussion, we can consider a project ""testable"" if its code is easy to unit test, it is easy to deploy multiple times reliably, and it has good introspection capabilities. When the testability level of a project is not monitored, it can end up becoming a burden for the team. These testability problems usually add up in small steps, making them hard to detect if we do not make the effort to look for them. Some examples of testability problems are poor communication about expected behavior, high thresholds for making tests, and low traceability of bugs. These problems make not only testing, but also implementation, harder. It follows that testability is something that teams must devote a considerable amount of time and energy to. First, testability allows a project to grow to several teams. Second, by facilitating testing it enables more and better tests, which results in higher quality. Finally, many developers do not realise its importance and impact, thus it is not something that will typically be addressed unless someone focuses on it. Esteban Manchado Velázquez has been working on software development for around 10 years and is currently Quality Assurance Engineer and <b>...</b>
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