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Balazs Gardi

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Original author: 
Fred Ritchin

What do we want from our media revolution? Not just where is it bringing us—but where do we want to go? When the pixels settle, where do we think we should be in relationship to media—as producers, subjects, viewers? Since all media inevitably change us, how do we want to be changed?

There used to be a time when one could show people a photograph and the image would have the weight of evidence—the “camera never lies.” Certainly photography always lied, but as a quotation from appearances it was something viewers counted on to reveal certain truths. The photographer’s role was pivotal, but constricted: for decades the mechanics of the photographic process were generally considered a guarantee of credibility more reliable than the photographer’s own authorship.

But this is no longer the case. The excessive use of photographs to “brand” an image (whether of oneself online, of celebrities, of products, of major companies, or of governments), and to illustrate preconceptions rather than to uncover what is there (presidents are made to look presidential, and poor people are generally depicted as victimized), as well as the extraordinary malleability of the photograph due to software such as Photoshop, make photography more of a rhetorical strategy, like words, rather than an automatic proof of anything. Photographs must now persuade, often in concert with other media, rather than rely on a routine perception that they inevitably record the way things are.

The billion or so people with camera-equipped cellphones, meanwhile, make photography, like all social media, an easily distributed exchange of information and opinions with few effective filters to help determine which are the most relevant and accurate. The professional photojournalist and documentarian, now a tiny minority of those regularly photographing, often are unsure not only how to reach audiences through the media haze, but also how to get their viewers to engage with the often extraordinarily important situations they witness and chronicle.

This moment of enormous transition forces a rethinking of what photography can do, and what we want it to accomplish. For example, if a young person wanted to become a war photographer, we have hundreds of books showing how others have photographed war. But what if a young person wanted, instead, to become a photographer of peace? The genre, unfortunately, does not yet exist.

Perhaps, then, we might want to begin focusing less on the spectacle of war and more on those impacted by the consequences of war—as Monica Haller has done, along with many others. The all-type cover of her book, Riley and His Story, disputes any conventional reading: “This is not a book. This is an invitation, a container for unstable images, a model for further action…. Riley was a friend in college and later served as a nurse at Abu Ghraib prison. This is a container for Riley’s digital pictures and fleeting traumatic memories. Images he could not fully secure or expel and entrusted to me…. This is not a book. It is an object of deployment.”

The collaboration is intended to help Riley Sharbonno resurrect buried memories and deal with some of what he went through in a war that destabilized his life. There are pictures that he does not remember taking of events that he does not remember witnessing. Photographs, once rediscovered, sometimes assuage his guilt, providing a reason for what has happened. Some of the grand half-truths about war are diluted. But there is anger, too: “I want you to see what this war did to Riley.”

Similarly, Jennifer Karady revisits the enduring trauma of violent conflict in her collaborations with soldiers, working for about a month with each one to re-stage calamitous situations in civilian life that they had experienced in war. Finding a discarded tire on the side of the road in Virginia evokes memories of a possible IED, for instance, or looking out of a window in upstate New York while protected by sandbags recalls a vulnerability to attack—each of these pictures is made with family members participating. Karady views the procedure as potentially therapeutic for those involved, while helping to make the legacy of war somewhat more comprehensible to family and friends stateside. And unlike the imagery from so many war photographers, her pictures are not at all glamorous.

Some are also using their photographs to make sure that the violence is not forgotten by the broader society. In her project “Reframing History,” Susan Meiselas returned to Nicaragua in 2004 with nineteen murals created from her own photographs made during that country’s Sandinista Revolution twenty-five years earlier. She placed the murals at the sites where the imagery was originally made, collaborating with local communities in visualizing their own collective memories and also helping to better acquaint Nicaraguan youth with their own past. (Imagine then if it were possible to place photographs from Robert Frank’s landmark book, The Americans, made in the 1950s, on billboards around this country where the photos were made—given the critical nature of many of his photographs, it would be an extraordinary way to gauge societal change, or the lack of it.)

And some are trying to share the vagaries of war as they occur in a sort of real-time family album. Basetrack, created by Teru Kuwayama and Balazs Gardi, was an experimental social-media project that consisted of a small team of embedded photographers primarily using iPhones, which focused upon about a thousand Marines in the 1st Battalion, Eighth Marines, during their deployment to southern Afghanistan in 2010–11. They curated a news feed alongside their own efforts, employed Google Maps as an interface, wrote posts in addition to photographing, all with a view “to connect[ing] a broader public to the longest war in U.S. history,” intent on involving their audience, many of them family members, in the discussion. Trying to establish transparency, they created an editing tool for the military to censor photographs and texts that might put soldiers in danger, and asked the military to supply reasons for the censorship, which were then made visible when a viewer placed the cursor over the blacked-out section.

It was a relatively effective system, until in 2011, when the Facebook discussion became too difficult for the military to handle and the photographers were “uninvited” a month before the troops’ deployment ended. Apparently a good deal of the content that military officials found problematic was about relatively minor matters, such as parents complaining that their sons and daughters had to wear brown and not white socks on patrol. Now only the Facebook page is still active, with curated news and continuing audience discussions. One mother’s response to the project: “It has truly saved me from a devastating depression and uncontrollable anxiety after my son deployed. Having this common ground with other moms helped me so much and gives me encouragement each day.”

And then there are others who, rather than wait for the apocalypse, are attempting to see what can be done to help prevent it. In James Balog’s long-term photography project, “Extreme Ice Survey,” cameras are positioned in remote arctic and alpine areas, automatically photographing the melting of the ice to help more precisely calculate the impact of global warming, and to create a visual record of a planet in crisis. According to the EIS website: “currently, 28 cameras are deployed at 13 glaciers in Greenland, Iceland, the Nepalese Himalaya, Alaska and the Rocky Mountains of the U.S. These cameras record changes in the glaciers every half hour, year-round during daylight, yielding approximately 8,000 frames per camera per year.”

Or, if we want to make sure that the opinions of the subjects photographed are better understood, why not at times show them their image on the back of the digital camera, and ask what they think of the ways in which they are depicted, and record their voices?  An even more collaborative exchange of perceptions is that between Swedish photographer Kent Klich and Beth R., a former prostitute and drug addict living in Copenhagen whom he began photographing in the 1980s. In the 2007 book Picture Imperfect, his photographs, along with case histories and images from Beth’s family album as a child, are paired with an enclosed DVD of Beth’s daily life for which she herself was the primary filmmaker.

Finally, when making pictures, maybe they can serve another, more practical function. For French artist JR’s 2008–2009 project, “28 Millimeters, Women Are Heroes,” photographs were not only used to document the faces of women living in modest dwellings in various countries, but in Kenya he began to make the oversize prints water-resistant so that when used as roof coverings the pictures themselves would help to protect the women’s fragile houses in the rainy season

Countless innovators, often working far from the spotlight, are today creating visual media that can be useful in a variety of ways. Rather than simply attempting to replicate previous photographic icons and strategies, these newer efforts are essential to revitalizing a medium that has lost much of its power to engage society on larger issues.

And then what is needed are people who can figure out effective and timely ways to curate the enormous numbers of images online from all sources—amateur and professional alike—so this imagery too can play a larger role. As badly as we need a reinvention of photography, we also will require an assertive metaphotography that contextualizes, authenticates, and makes sense of the riches within this highly visible but largely unexplored online archive.

Fred Ritchin is a professor at NYU and co-director of the Photography & Human Rights program at the Tisch School of the Arts. His newest book, Bending the Frame: Photojournalism, Documentary, and the Citizenwas published by Aperture in 2013.

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Features 

Now know why I couldn’t find Chien-Chi Chang’s Burma work in May when writing about this year’s Visa Pour l’image program….It’s only being published now… in National Geographic Magazine’s August issue…

Chien-Chi Chang: Land of Shadows (NGM: August 2011) Burma

Somalia drought in the news…

Tyler Hicks: Fleeing Somalia’s Drought (NYT: July 2011)

Robin Hammond: Drought Crisis in Somalia (Guardian: July 2011)

South Sudan….

Francesco Zizola: South Sudan on the Eve of Independence (NOOR: July 2011)

Dominic Nahr: Republic of South Sudan Gains Independence (Magnum: July 2011)

Cedric Gerberhaye: Land of Cush (Magnum Emergency Foundation: July 2011) Sudan

I had a quick look at the latest New Yorker issue at my local newsagents’ the other day…It had, what must have been a 10,000 word, article by Philip Gourevitch on Rwandan cycling team…Photos by Dominic Nahr… Only two frames tho, unless I counted wrong…double spread of the below image to open the piece and then another….Would have expected more photos to be used for such a long piece, but then again, New Yorker is pretty word heavy magazine…Luckily we can see 10 frames on their brilliant Photo booth….

Dominic Nahr: Rwandan Cycling Team (New Yorker: July 2011)

Sven Torfinn: In Sierra Leone, Widened Access to Health Care Saves Lives (NYT: July 2011)

KC Ortiz: West Papuan Rebels (Newsweek: July 2011)

Libya…

Plenty of Katie Orlinsky’s photos in the latest Visura Magazine… Do make sure to also read the text…

Katie Orlinsky: Libya (Visura Magazine: July 2011)

Bryan Denton: As Rebels Capture Towns, Destruction Follows (NYT: July 2011)

David Degner: Libyans Live With 5 Months of War (MSNBC: July 2011) More on Degner’s website

I was checking on the VII website yesterday whether there were any features I hadn’t seen… Nothing new on the front page, but plenty on the VII Network page… The VII front page does often feature series by the Network photographers, but not all of them… not quite sure what is the criteria,as for instance Lynsey Addario’s new work is pretty much always on the VII front page…including the  recent Five-Star Delhi…The below Bhutan work wasn’t tho.. Anyway, have to remember to keep checking the Network page more often…Although, VII is closing the Network soon…Guess it’ll all be clearer then…

Lynsey Addario: Bhutan (VII Network: July 2011)

Jessica Dimmock: Gossip Girls (VII Network: July 2011)

Seamus Murphy: Chinese Tourists in Italy (VII Network: July 2011)

VII Network members from Afghanistan…

Tivadar Domaniczky: Living with the 1-8 (VII Network: 2011) Afghanistan

Eric Bouvet: French Commandos (VII Network: 2011) Afganistan

Also Afghanistan…

Charles Ommanney: Petraeus’s Final Days in Afghanistan (Newsweek: July 2011)

Balazs Gardi: Afghanistan with iPhone (bewaremag.com: July 2011)

Chloe Dewe Matthews: The Caspian Sea (Panos: July 2011)

Alinka Echeverria: The Road To Tepeyac (Foto8: July 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen: Gold Fever (NOOR: July 2011)

Nina Berman: September 11: The Afterglow (NOOR)

Sergio Ramazzotti: The Interpreter (Parallelo Zero Vimeo: 2011)

Magnum Photos: Tour de France (Magnum in Motion: July 2011)

Mark Redondo: In God’s Hands (Visura: July 2011)

Gordon Parks: F.S.A. (NYT Lens: July 2011)

Colombia…

Alvaro Ybarra Zavala: Hunting FARC (Reportage by Getty Images: July 2011)

Franco Pagetti: Women’s Prison (VII Magazine: July 2011) Colombia

Carlotta Zarattini: Cambodia (NYT Lens: July 2011)

Kenneth O’Halloran: Living with Alzheimer’s (TIME LB: July 2011)

Gabriela Bulisova: Formerly Incarcerated Women (Al Jazeera English: July 2011) US Prison System

Martin Usborne: Dog’s in Cars (TIME: LB: July 2011)

Daniel Etter: Syria  - A Revolution Silenced (Photographer’s website: 2011)

Kosuke Okahara: Inevitable Moment (Photographer’s website: 2011) Cairo

Events - Frontline Club Photography Network Party : 20 July : London

multiMedia

New issue of Visura Magazine is available online

Viceland Photo Issue

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

This year’s Ian Parry Scholarship winner and finalists have been announced….

Ian Parry Scholarship Winner and Finalists (pdf) (Ian Parry Scholarship press release: July 2011)

BJP: Landscape first for Ian Parry Scholarship (BJP: July 2011)

Ed Ou wins the City of Perpignan Young Reporter Award for his Children of Men work (BJP: July 2011)

Congratulations to all the winners in the Press Photographers’ Year competition…

photo: Adam Dean  | First Prize: photo essay

The Press Photographers’ Year 2011 : Winners’ list :  Slideshow of Winning work

The winner of the 2011 Inge Morath, Zhe Che (Ingemorath.org: July 2011)

Open Society Documentary Photography Project announces Moving Walls 19 photographers (soros.org: July 2011)

Articles

More on Arles…

Francis Hodgson: Arles the fun of the fair (FT: July 2011)

Ben Burbridge: Arles 2011 (Photoworks blog: 2011)

Doug Mills shooting stills and video at the same time…crazy shiiiit….

NYT Lens: Doug Mills : Shooting Twice at Once (NYT Lens: July 2011)

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: David Azia (Guardian: July 2011)

Verve: Stefano de Luigi (Verve Photo: July 2011)

Photoshelter: 11 Content Ideas for Your Photo Blog (Photoshelter: July 2011)

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.20: Famine iconography as a sign of failure (DC blog: July 2011)

David Campbell: Imaging Famine: a debate (DC blog: July 2011)

Guardian: Why you are the future of photography (Guardian: July 2011) A new show suggests that webcams, Google Street View and a cat named Nancy Bean are set to change the world of photography as we know it

BJP: Sports Photography: Breaking the waves (BJP: June 2011)

Getting Started in Google Plus: A Photographer’s Guide (Piziq.com)

Jehad Nga writes about his father on TIME Lightbox…

Jehad Nga: 1960′s Libya: A Glimpse of Life Before Gaddafi (TIME LB: July 2011)

Interviews

Lynsey Addario (NPR: July 2011)

Alec Soth (Hereontheweb: July 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen (I Am Nikon blog: 2011)

Edward Burtynsky (Themorningnews.org: 2011)

Donald Weber (DVA foto: July 2011)

David Walter Banks (NPR: 2011)

Daro Sulakauri (NYT Lens: July 2011) Sulakauri’s website

Katie Orlinsky (Youtube: 2011)

Leonie Hampton (Ideastap: July 2011)

Don McCullin (BBC: 2011)

Taryn Simon (Guardian: May 2011)

Platon (BBC Radio: July 2011)

Mishka Henner (Telegraph: July 2011)

Tessa Bunney (e-photoreview: July 2011)

Charles Ommanney and Brooks Kraft (Youtube:  2004)

Books

Pieter Hugo: Permanent Error book review on BJP (BJP: June 2011)

Taryn Simon: A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters on book review on Foto8 (Foto8: July 2011)

Photographers 

Nick Ballon

Christina Theisen

Polly Braden

Zhe Chen

Jon Browning

Kate Hooper

To finish off…. Check out  Cathal McNaughton‘s contemporary take on Elliott Erwitt classic below…I saw McNaughton’s frame on a Reuters slideshow on Northern Ireland…

And two videos demonstrating the rolling shutter effect….

iPhone video enhanced by rolling shutter effect

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Before we take a look at the Royal Wedding coverage, just let you know, that I have kept updating the ‘Tim Hetherington/ Chris Hondros In Memoriam’ post with related links…Below a couple of the more recent links… the first three below I found via @LucasJacksonRTR

Articles – Max Hastings: Death or Glory (FT: April 2011)

Articles - Régis Le Sommier: My Footsteps in Your Footsteps (Paris Match: April 2011)

Articles – Washington Post: Style writer Dan Zak reflects on collaborating with photographers (WP: April 2011)

Four more…

Olivier Laurent: Remembering Chris Hondros (BJP: April 2011)

Donald R. Winslow: Chris Hondros Remembered As A “Prophetic Humanist” (NPPA: April 2011)

NPPA: London Funeral For Tim Hetherington In May

Getty Images: Fiancée of Getty Images Photographer Chris Hondros Announces Fund to Aid Photojournalists

Features…

Features and Essays - Balazs Gardi: On the Rough Edge of Rio (Newsweek: April 2011)  Police and Drug Lords Battle for the Streets of Rio

photo: Bryan Denton

New York Times: Battle for Libya photo gallery (NYT: May 2011)

Jonas Bendiksen’s most recent NatGeo work featured on NPR PictureShow… Worth another look for sure…Compelling, not-overly-stylised, image-making in context with important subject matter…photojournalism at its best, really.

Features and Essays - Jonas Bendiksen: Bangladesh: A Present-Day Water World (NPR: May 2011)

Peter diCampo‘s Life Without Lights was featured on PDN’s Photo of the Day…

Features and Essays – Peter diCampo: Life Without Lights (PDN: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Pier Casotti: Arctic Spleen (Photographer’s website: 2011)

Features and Essays - Abbas: Children of the Lotus (Magnum in Motion: April 2011)

Features and Essays - Platon: Champions to End Malaria (New Yorker: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Sean Gallagher: China’s Wetland Revolution (NatGeo: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Greg Funnell: Rwanda (Guardian: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Melanie Burford: The Monster Under the Water (Prime Collective: April 2011)

Now to the wedding…

TIME magazine had assigned VII photographers Christopher Morris and Joachim Ladefoged for the royal wedding… Really enjoyed these Chris Morris frames from the day before wedding…haven’t yet seen his big day coverage other than this tilt-and-shift baby

Features and Essays – Christopher Morris: Royal Anticipation (TIME LB: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Joachim Ladefoged: The Royal Kiss (TIME LB: April 2011)

Martin Parr continues his love-affair with cakes in his Royal Wedding coverage…He seems to have had two assignments for the day, as both TIME and Guardian have his work up on their websites… Not bad, if you can get such gigs for one shoot! Neither of the two slideshows share any shots exactly the same, but there are several of same scenes…three comparisons below.. Guardian shots on the left, TIME Lightbox on the right…I don’t know if it’s just me, but I thought it was surprising that the slideshows do not share a single frame since it’s basically the same shoot/assignment…It’s almost like both clients were promised certain images exclusively…Otherwise I would have expected Parr to make a strongest possible edit and file that to both…Obviously picture editors at TIME and Guardian have chosen their faves for their slideshows, but I doubt very much that if they were doing their selection from the same original Parr edit, that there wouldn’t be overlap…I’m just curious, why would anybody file two frames almost exactly the same (the cakes in the middle below) instead of just one…unless of course you file tons or have promised a certain kind of exclusivity…Although, my thinking is flawed in the sense that it’s difficult to see much exclusivity in having certain frames, if there are other around elsewhere very much like it…who knows…I don’t…Just wondering…

I hope he remembered not to charge the expenses twice;)

Features and Essays – Martin Parr: Bunting and Bonding: Martin Parr’s Wedding Parties (TIME LB: May 2011)

Features and Essays – Martin Parr: Walsall Celebrates the royal wedding (Guardian: April 2011)

Veronica was out and about too…

Features and Essays – Veronica Sanchis: Royal Wedding (Photographer’s website: April 2011)

By the way, if anyone needs an assistant on occational basis in London – for instance on location, in studio, or for scanning/ spotting/retouching – do get in touch with Veronica. She is already assisting a couple of photographers in the capital, but would have time for more. You can find Veronica’s contact details on her website.

Features and Essays – Tiffany Jones: A Royal Picnic (Photographer’s website: April 2011) via @drinckx 

Always love David Burnett’s blog posts…

Blogs – David Burnett: Of Big Events and Such (Photographer’s blog: April 2011)

A lot of Twitter chatter on Saturday regarding which of the UK papers had the best royal wedding cover…Seems a lot of them went for the safe bet, the kiss on the balcony.  The Times, however, did something different… and based on the examples, they stole the show…

Congrats to @Wiggys and @jonhilldesign are in order…

Articles - The Media Blog: Times takes Royal Wedding cover crow (Media Blog: April 2011)

A lot of talk online in the recent days also about Steve McCurry’s Craigslist ad for an intern… It turned out Vincent Laforet is also looking for someone – well actually three people – to help him around the studio…The opportunities offered by the two photographers couldn’t be much different…

Articles – A Photo Editor: Photographers Steve McCurry and Vincent Laforet Hiring Help – New vs. Old (school) (APE: April 2011)

Speaking of Steve McCurry…I ended up reading a blog post (found via @duckrabbitblog) by Arif Iqball, a participant of one of McCurry’s workshops…Not a glowing endorsement to attend one to put it mildly…I was hesitating whether to post the link,  but then I thought that to shy away from sharing it would be a disservice to any people reading this blog who might consider attending one of his workshops… Obviously, the below is just one person’s view…Although, you might also want to read the comments, as there seems to be others with similar experiences…

Arif Iqball: Reflections on Steve McCurry Myanmar Workshop (Photographer’s blog: March 2011)

Articles – Slate: War -Zone Insurance (Slate: Apri 2011) Getting covered for war- and terrorism-related accidents

Awards - Overseas Press Club Awards (Poynter: April 2011)

AwardsMagenta Foundation Flash Forward 2011 winners

AwardsSony World Photography Awards 2011, L’Iris D’Or and winners announced (Professional Photographer: April 2011)

Awards – BJP: David Goldblatt wins Kraszna-Krausz Photography Book Award (BJP: April 2011)

Articles – PDN: Agnes Dherbeys Wins OPC Robert Capa Medal

InterviewsAgnes Dherbeys : Thai Protest Photos Earn the Robert Capa Award. Agnes Dherbeys Is interviewed on Lens (NYT Lens: April 2011)

There’s been a lot of media interest in the sale of some of John G Morris’ collections… I remember linking to both Guardian’s and Newsweek’s pieces already…just in case you missed those, here’s two more…

Articles – NYT Lens: John Morris auctions collection of Capa, Lange, Cartier-Bresson,Gene Smith and John Morris (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Articles – BBC: Photo pioneer Morris’s collection goes under the hammer (BBC: April 2011)

Tips for creatives by Greg Benson

Tips and Tutorials –  Greg Benson: Tips for creatives  1 | 2 | 3 | 4 (Photographer’s blog: April 2011)

JobsAP are looking for a Full-time Chief Photographer based out of Kenya (Associated Press) via @gallagher_photo

WebsitesFirecracker May 2011

Articles – Poynter: Emphas.is builds community of support for quality photojournalism (Poynter: April 2011)

Articles - Teru Kuwayama: Which of Us Dies First? (Gizmodo: April 2011)

Articles – Michael Kamber: Kamber response to Teru’s attacks (LS: April 2011)

CrowfundingBesieged :  4 photojournalists in Congo (Emphas.is)

InterviewsChristoph Bangert : A Personal Story From Japan (NYT Lens: April 2011)

InterviewsBrian Ulrich :  Show Us Your Studio (Lightwork: April 2011)

photo: Brian Ulrich

Articles – Viz.: Dead Malls, Dead Stores – Toward a New American Gothic (Viz: April 2011)

InterviewsElizabeth Biondi (NYPH: April 2011)

InterviewsLarry Towell (Magnum Foundation: April 2011)

InterviewsMatt Slaby (APE: April 2011)

InterviewsRachel Smith (NYPH: April 2011)

Ernie Pyle was killed 66 years ago… They found this in his pocket….  (via @jimsheeler)

Articles – Ernie Pyle: On Victory in Europe(journalism.indiana.edu: 2011) “This column was never completed. A draft of it was found in Pyle’s pocket, April 18, 1945, the day he was killed by a Japanese machine-gunner on the island of Ie Shima.”

Articles – CNN: ‘Bang Bang Club’: Demands of film distort truth (CNN: April 2011)

To finish with….Something funky for Sunday..Not PJ related at all…‘Motion stills’ from From Me To You blog

Still looking forward to this… Somewhere to Disappear..a road trip adventure across America with Alec Soth.

And remember kids…”All the technique in the world doesn’t compensate for the inability to notice.” –Elliot Erwitt via @melisslyttle

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I was supposed to begin with World Press Photo links, but after last night’s events in Cairo, I think it’s only right to start with Egypt…

Photo: Marco Longari

Features and Essays - NYT Lens: Pictures of the Day: Egypt and Elsewhere (NYT: February 2011)

The New York Times Egypt gallery again….

Features and Essays - NYT: Protests in Egypt (NYT: February 2011)

Photo: Alan Chin

Features and Essays - Alan Chin: Mubarak No More (BNN: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Ed Ou: Young Egyptian’s Spread Their Message (NYT: February 2011) video Cairo’s Facebook Flat

Features and Essays – Magnum: Egypt by Magnum photographers (Magnum: February 2011)

From Los Angeles Times…

Features and Essays – Michael Robinson Chavez: Firsthand account of Cairo clashes (LAT: February 2011) Times photographer Michael Robinson Chavez recounts his experiences covering the bloody clashes as thousands of supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak attacked anti-government protesters in Cairo’s Tahrir Square on Wednesday.

Photo: Moises Saman

InterviewsEd Ou and Moises Saman : Photographing the Celebration in Cairo (NYT Lens: February 2011)

Great piece by Stephen Farrell on the Lens blog the other day…still relevant as an insight into how difficult it was for a lot of photojournalists to work in Cairo…

Interviews - Stephen Farrell : What Not to Bring to Tahrir Square (NYT Lens: February 2011)

Interviews - Ron Haviv : Reading faces in Tahrir square (MSNBC: February 2011)

Now to World Press Photo…Congratulation to Jodi Bieber for winning the top prize this year!

Awards - World Press Photo 2011 Winners Gallery

Photo: Jodi Bieber

Articles - CPN: Jodi Bieber wins World Press Photo of the Year 2010 (CPN: February 2011)

InterviewsJodi Bieber (World Press Photo: February 2011) A phone call to Jodi Bieber
World Press Photo managing director called South African photographer Jodi Bieber to tell her the news that her photo was selected as the World Press Photo of the Year 2010.)

Great World Press Photo coverage by BJP’s @OliviercLaurent yesterday….

Articles - BJP: Jodie Bieber wins World Press Photo (BJP: February 2011)

Articles - BJP: Independent photographers win big at World Press Photo (BJP: February 2011)

Photo: Olivier Laban-Mattei

Articles – BJP : World Press Photo judges about the shocking images in this year’s result (BJP: February 2011)

Articles - NYT Lens: Is This the Best News Picture in the World? (NYT Lens: February 2011

Damon Winter/3rd place POYi/Hipstamatic debate…

Articles – Poynter: Chat replay: What role do image apps like Hipstamatic have in photojournalism? (Poynter: February 2011)

Photo: Damon Winter

Interviews – Damon Winter: Through My Eye, Not Hipstamatic’s (NYT Lens: February 2011)

Interviews – Damon Winter : Winter explains process, philosophy behind award-winning Hipstamatic photos (Poynter: February 2011)

Articles – Chip Litherland: There’s an App for Photojournalism (Photographer’s blog: February 2011)

Articles – DVA Foto: Some thoughts on iPhone pictures and POYi (Dva Foto: February 2011)

About POYi in general…

Articles - NYT: And the Winnner Is…. Anonymous (NYT Lens: February 2011)

And don’t forget to read the latest from Shit Photojournalists Like…

Blogs - SFL: Photography Contests (SFL: February 2011)

And to other things…

Photo: Steve McCurry

Features and Essays – Steve McCurry: The Last Roll of Kodachrome (Vanity Fair: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Christopher Anderson: A Little Goes a Long Way (Magnum in Motion: February 2011) Hunger in America

Features and Essays – Peter DiCampo: Life Without Lights (Project website) Project blog

Features and Essays – Christian Lutz: Tropical Gift (MSNBC: February 2011)

Features and Essays - Kevin Frayer/AP: A Bird’s-eye View of Afghanistan (TIME: February 2011) Helmand province as seen from the air

Features and Essays – Brent Stirton: Gold’s Costly Dividend (Human Rights Watch: 2011)

Features and Essays - Katie Orlinsky: Persevering in Ciudad Juárez (NYT: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Brian Cassey: Cyclone Yasi – CAT 5 (Fotostrada: February 2010) Queensland, Australia

Sad news from Afghanistan…

News – PDN: Photojournalist Giles Duley Gravely Injured in Afghanistan (PDN)

Always worth checking out the Month in Photography…Guardian’s multimedia guide to best exhibitions and books….

Photo: Balazs Gardi

Exhibitions and Books – Guardian: The Month in Photography

Articles - Telegraph: Sony World Photography Awards 2011 – professional finalists and shortlisted images (Telegraph: February 2011) Same in New Yorker

Fundraising - The Middle East Journals of Tom Hurndall (Indiegogo)

BlogsThe Atlantic : In Focus

Articles – Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Carlos Barria (Guardian: February 2011)

InterviewsPeter Turnley interview on Ceausescu, Honecker,Tiananmen, Mubarak (CNN: February 2011)

Interviews - Yumi Goto (e-photoreview: February 2011)

Interviews - Mike Berube (e-photoreview: January 2011)

Interviews - Jonathan Taggart (NYT Lens: February 2011)

CompetitionsChanges-Art

Competitions - Foam Magazine is accepting submissions from under 35yo photogs for their Talent Issue.

Grants - Judges named for Getty Images Grants for Good. Photographers may apply by March 1.

FestivalsThe New York Photo Festival now open for submissions Deadline FEB 25 2011 Theme: Provocation

Festivals – Noorderlicht : Voices of the Middle East : Call for submissions

Workshops/Events - Rhubarb-Rhubarb : See expecially their seminars page here : Next two seminars: Title: Photography Still Moving Date: 19th March 2011 Time:10.30am – 4.30 pm Venue: The Box, QUAD Market Place Cathedral Quarter Derby DE1 3AS UK AND Title: The Crossing : WM Date: 26th March 2011 Time: 11am – 6pm Venue: The Theatre , The Custard Factory, Gibb Street, Digbeth, Birmingham . B9 4AA

Equipment - Thuraya

Equipment - BGAN

Articles - Todd Bigelow: 10 things photo assistant should pay attention to (Todd Bigelow blog: February 2011)

Articles - Wada Laube: Some lessons from Leibovitz (Wada Laube blog: February 2011) Found via @LucasJacksonRTR

Articles - Casey Templeton: Bringing Your Vision to Your Clients Brand (Photographer’s blog: February 2011)

I’m ashamed to state this… but I can’t help but recognise myself in the people in Tim Fadek’s photo below…. I might be out with Veronica and our friends having a great time or something and I still can’t stop fiddling my iPhone…

Photo: Tim Fadek

Articles/Features and Essays – Tim Fadek: Is Social Media Destroying Public Interaction? (BNN: February 2011)

Photographers - Victoria Will

PhotographersBen Cannon

Photographers - Spencer Murphy

PhotographersCharles Ludeke

Agencies - The Church of London

I saw @timfadek tweet this… “Viber is great, free phone calls to other members on iPhone. Like skype but more reliable” http://www.viber.com/ Have to check it out, definitely….

@valerioberdini tweeted this….pretty funny… How To Be Cool at a Gallery Opening

Gotta love Bill Cunningham…Probably first time I’ve seen Anna Wintour without sunglasses…She looks pretty… the sunglasses always gave me a mean vibe of her…

Trailer - Bill Cunningham New York

News - Alec Soth diversifies into print & scan photography services.

Nearly 2,5K views yesterday…all time record…and I didn’t even do updates…I think it was all those people googling “Jodi Bieber” that brought most of the traffic..

To finish off, a joke: “A man goes to doctor..”I’m addicted to Twitter”, he says…Doctor says: “I’m sorry, I don’t follow you” via @JemimaGoldsmith

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