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Cedric Gerbehaye

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War/Photography, on view from Nov. 11 to Feb. 3, is a magnificent, wide-ranging exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. As chief curator Anne Wilkes Tucker explains in the sumptuous catalogue, that slash in the title is important: this is not a show simply of photographs of war. It’s a demonstration and examination of the relationship between the two and how that relationship has changed over time. There are plenty of images of combat, but the catchment area extends way beyond the battlefield–both in space and in time–to include preparations for war, refugees fleeing its consequences, damage to property and the physical and psychological aftermath of conflict. Taken by some of the most famous photographers—more than 280 are showcased—in the history of the medium, by aerial reconnaissance units and unknown combatants and civilians, the pictures are drawn from the archives of photo agencies such as Magnum, military archives and personal family albums. It’s a stunning show, full of well-known pictures, surprising new ones and—if one consults the catalogue—surprises about well-known pictures.

More than a few of the featured pictures have been either faked or staged. That is to put it too simply, for the slipperiness of the distinction between “real” and “arranged”, or “genuine” and “fake”, turns out to be one of the themes of the show. The problem crops up right from the get-go, with Roger Fenton’s famous pair of pictures of the Valley of Death (1856) from the Crimean war—one of which shows cannonballs strewn more abundantly than the other. (slide #1) The scholarly war over which picture was taken first continues to rage. I thought this question had been definitively settled by Errol Morris in his book Believing is Seeing but John Stauffer argues in the catalogue for precisely the opposite conclusion. The “Dead Rebel Sharp Shooter” in Alexander Gardner’s famous image from the Civil War (slide #2) was dragged to the place where he is seen to have died and arranged in such a way that the rifle — not his own but a prop carried by the photographer — added extra pathos.

As with the Civil War, so in the First World War: it was impossible to take pictures of actual combat. One of the reasons why the famous footage of soldiers going over the top at the Battle of the Somme is faked is because it is on film. Filmed at a training ground, it shows a soldier who is shot, falls down, looks at the camera — and folds his arm before dying. Among the most spectacular images of the war, James Frank Hurley’s “An Episode after the Battle of Zonnebeke” (c.1918) (slide #3) seems like a composite expression of our idea of the Western Front — because, it turns out, it is a composite print made from multiple negatives. As Siegfried Sassoon wrote in his poem “Cinema Hero”: “It’s the truth/That somehow never happened.”

The complexity of Hurley’s image is in stark contrast to Wesley David Archer’s photograph of a pilot who has bailed out of his burning plane (c.1933) (slide #4). It is a picture full of suspense because we don’t know whether the parachute is going to open. What we do now know, courtesy of his widow, is that it was done with a model airplane. Armed with this knowledge you go back to the original and… it still looks amazing! You don’t feel cheated so much as admiring of someone who could create such a truth after (or independent of ) the fact.

Everyone is familiar with the doubts that continue to swirl around Robert Capa’s picture of the “Death of a Loyalist Militiaman” (1936) (slide #5) in the Spanish Civil War. No one can agree on exactly the circumstances in which it was made. And so, ironically, while photography is generally assumed to be strong as evidence but weak in meaning, Capa’s photograph has come to resemble painting, of which the contrary is held to be true. Joe Rosenthal’s image of the flag-raising on Iwo Jima in 1945 is an especially complicated case in that it was widely assumed to have been staged, faked, rigged or something like that, even if we can’t remember exactly what is supposed to have gone on because it’s all a bit muddled up with memories of the Clint Eastwood film about what happened.

The full story, as narrated in the catalogue, is that the flag was raised twice — not for Rosenthal’s benefit but, in the words of the Lieutenant Colonel who ordered it to be done, “so that every son-of-a-bitch on this whole cruddy island (could) see it.” (slide #6) How do we know this is accurate? Because there are photographs – i.e. photographs of the sequence of events that led to Rosenthal taking his photograph – to prove it. (see below) In any case, the success of Rosenthal’s image was due to the way that it not only recorded a moment and event but, in doing so, expressed a truth of enduring – even mythic – proportions about the Marine Corps. The same could be said of Len Chetwyn’s iconic picture from the North Africa (1942) campaign: a photograph which proves, at the most basic level, that this was indeed a battle waged by men in shorts! (not shown). The fact that a detail from it is used on the cover of a beautiful Australian edition of Alan Moorhead’s African Trilogy highlights the way that documentary veracity and imaginative truth are mutually supporting. The surprising thing – which turns out not to be so surprising if we consider how perfectly the picture is composed and lit — is that it’s the photograph that provides the imaginative half of that equation. Smoke grenades had indeed been deployed, but for pictorial effect rather than combat effectiveness.

Louis R. Lowery / Bob Campbell / Bill Genaust — The Museum of Fine Arts Houston

Three examples of photographs that documented the sequence of events leading to Rosenthal's iconic photograph of the flag raising on Iwo Jima.

So there is a delicious irony, in a show that is so scrupulous and judicious in its investigation of the relationship between real and doctored pictures that the catalogue seems, in one instance, to have fallen victim to a booby-trap in its midst. John Filo’s photograph of the killings at Kent State in 1970 shows a distraught woman kneeling over the body of a dead student. Unfortunately it so happened that a pole in the background looked like it was coming out of her head. Since this pole was aesthetically unpleasing, it was removed from the picture as published in Life magazine and elsewhere. Amazingly this clumsily doctored version – you can see quite clearly how the pole has been erased – is the one printed in the War/Photography catalogue! (slide #7)

Courtesy of Jeff Wall

Dead Troops Talk (a vision after an ambush of a Red Army patrol, near
Moqor, Afghanistan, winter 1986), 1992

As we move into the contemporary the distinction between art and documentary becomes increasingly hard to sustain—or to put it the other way around, the No-Man’s Land between the two grows ever larger—as shown in works by color photographer Luc Delahaye (slide #8) and photojournalist Damon Winter’s Gurskey-esque view of a plane-load of troops “Flying Military Class” (slide #9). In Regarding the Pain of Others, Susan Sontag argued that Jeff Wall’s “fictional” image “Dead Troops Talk (a vision after an ambush of a Red Army patrol, near Moqor, Afghanistan)” was among the most successful war photographs of recent times. (note: Wall’s image is not part of the War/Photography exhibition) So perhaps Peter van Agtmael’s well-known shot of a line of U.S. troops sheltering from the downdraft of a helicopter in a rocky grey landscape in Nuristan, Afghanistan, in 2007, works on us powerfully for two reasons. (note: van Agtmael’s image is not part of the War/Photography exhibition) First because a compositional similarity to W. Eugene Smith’s shot of Marines sheltering from an explosion on Iwo Jima in 1945 (slide #10) establishes its place in the heroic and noble tradition of documentary photography. Second, because an uncanny resemblance to Wall’s image tacitly acknowledges that the fictive now sets a standard of authenticity to which the real is obliged to aspire.

Peter van Agtmael—Magnum

An American Blackhawk helicopter lands at the Ranch House, an isolated U.S. outpost in the Waigul Valley of Nuristan Province, near Afghanistan's eastern border with Pakistan, 2007.

The relationship between Wall’s large works and the scale and ambition of history paintings has often been remarked on. But Gary Knight’s picture from Dyala Bridge, Iraq, 2003 (slide #11) achieves an even more remarkable relationship with the art of the past. A photograph taken in the immediate aftermath of fighting, it combines the documentary immediacy and evidential power of the best photojournalism with the epic grandeur of history painting.

Geoff Dyer is an award-winning writer and journalist. See more of his work here.

WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath will open at the Museum of Fine Art Houston on Nov. 11, 2012.  The exhibit will then travel to Annenberg Space for Photography, Los Angeles; Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; and Brooklyn Museum through February 2014.

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William Klein’s urgent, radical, gritty, blurred and out of focus photographs are as dynamic and visceral as any the medium has produced. His revolutionary magnus opus ‘Life is Good & Good For You in New York’ is an uncompromising, groundbreaking portrait of urban life, which at the time of its publication in 1956 not only shocked the established order, but reinvented the photographic document and is now widely regarded as one of photography’s greatest and most influential works.

Daido Moriyama is the most celebrated photographer to emerge from the Japanese ‘Provoke’ movement. His grainy high contrast black-and-white photographs, focused on the urban environment of post-war Tokyo’s Shinjuku district, echo those of Klein’s New York. Like Klein, Moriyama has consistently revisited, reinvented and reworked his photographs within a process of constant flux.

The Tate Modern’s latest exhibition ‘William Klein + Daido Moriyama‘ brings together the work of the two photographers as a double feature—side by side retrospectives of photographers whose work is inextricably linked but independently minded. 

Following Matisse, Picasso; Albers, Maholy-Nagy; Rodchenko and Popova, the show is the latest in a program of double headers at the Tate Modern that explore two artists and how their work relates to one another. 

Simon Baker, the Tate Modern’s Curator of  Photography and International Art, spoke with TIME about the exhibition—the first full show he has curated since joining Tate Modern.

“It’s a matter of historical record that Klein’s book on New York and then his book on Tokyo were massively influential in Japan, and so the idea of the show exploring both influence and affinity, things that [Klein and Moriyama] have in common beyond the idea of influence, is very important. We are not saying that William was the beginning of all of Moriyama’s ideas, Moriyama was really influenced by Andy Warhol. He was massively influenced by Jack Kerouac and the Beat writers. So he had this series of really interesting dissident American influences of which one of them was William Klein—and we thought this was a good starting point.

Both photographers were really involved in the show’s installations. There are certain places in the show where they had free reign to do what they wanted. William’s response was to make huge blow-ups of his pictures—which realize his constant striving for impact and to make his images as confusing and overwhelming as the cities that they are of.

William Klein

Dakar, school’s out, 1985. Painted contact 1998

Moriyama’s response was to make a huge work called Memory, which is a grid of 1.5 meter wide photographs taken from different points in his career. There are images in there from Provoke, from Farewell Photography, from Japan: a Photo Theater, but there are also things from last year or maybe two years ago. He’s similarly free with his past.

We’ve also tried on the wall to show quite large grids of work so you have the sense of looking at images on the page. We have 70 framed prints from New York—There’s a whole group of children playing like you get in the book. There’s a whole group of shots at night in ballrooms like you get in the book—and also unpublished images from the same series. You get this sense of multiplicity.

We did the same thing with Moriyama. An incredible series of prints of Japan: A Photo Theater—which was his first really important book—are actually cut, mounted as exactly the same pairs that are on the pages of the book. So you’re standing in front of 75 small prints, many of which are like the small pages of the book.

We are not suggesting that the framed works are better than the book, but just that they give you a way into the material in the book, whilst remembering that the book is the really important thing. We’ve tried to keep that balance throughout the show. They think of their work in terms of layouts and sequences and series so we’ve tried to make that a feature of the installation.

Daido Moriyama

Memory of Dog 2, 1982

The show also focuses on what it means to photograph a great city like New York or a great city like Tokyo. And it’s interesting that Klein and Moriyama both photographed each other’s cities. Klein was a New Yorker who photographed New York and then went to Tokyo. Daido initially photographed entirely in Tokyo and then went to New York and did great work there.

Restless is the way to describe Klein’s attitude to his own work. [With Life is Good & Good For You in New York] He knows that he made a great book. And when he talks about it, he talks about wanting to change everything and he talks about blowing things up too big, making everything too grainy. Making the contrast too high. And he talks about that as a very deliberate thing. That he was trying to make a different aesthetic for photography.

Many people regard Robert Frank’s The Americans as the pinnacle of photo book-making, but Frank’s Americans doesn’t have the kind of impact, especially globally as [Life is Good & Good For You in New York]. What Klein’s book did for the way people think about photography in Latin America, in Europe and in Japan is probably unparalleled. And in that sense its greatness is hard to argue with.

But what I also think is really important and what the exhibition really claims is we’re used to thinking of the post-war 60s and 70s in a particular way, often skewed toward America. And for a long time, black-and-white photography, but particularly Japanese black-and-white photography, just wasn’t known here and wasn’t that understood. Provoke was this amazing work being made by a genuine avant-garde with theorists and thinkers and poets and writers. It was a proper thinking, functioning, avant-garde that was happening in Japan. The importance of that is beginning to be understood.

I think in another 10 years or so Moriyama, Takanashi and Nakahira will be as well known and in that moment, as well understood, as Eggleston and Friedlander.

Klein explored photography. He did some of the best photo books ever and moved on [to make films]. He moves in a very restless way, which I think is very interesting. Moriyama has been more consistent. He’s stuck very closely with photography.

The great pleasure for us and the great opportunity for Tate was to work with both of them directly. They’re both really active. Daido is doing amazing work. William’s still making photographs. He’s still interested in working. And for us; in a photography way, it is like getting to work with Matisse and Picasso while they’re still around. They are these great figures and we’re very fortunate to be able to work with them both.”

Simon Baker is the Tate Modern’s Curator of Photography and International Art

The Exhibition William Klein + Daido Moriyama is showing at Tate Modern, London from Oct. 10, 2012 – Jan. 20, 2013

Klein and Moriyama films Directed by Martin Hampton/Produced by Tate Media © TATE 2012

 

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Features and Essays

South Sudan is now independent… Some photos from the days prior the declaration of independence…

Pete Muller: Small arms and cattle-raiding in southern Sudan (Guardian: July 2011) One of the  photos…the one of police, very evocative of Dominic Nahr’s DRC Soldiers I thought…see for yourself.

Pete Muller: Into Existence: Southern Sudan on the Eve of Independence (TIME LB: July 2011)

Tyler Hicks: South Sudan Prepares for Independence (NYT: July 2011) Some of Hicks’ black and white work from South Sudan was featured on Lens blog.

Cedric Gerbehaye: Birth and Death in Southern Sudan (TIME LB: July 2011)

John Moore: Surviving the U.S. Recession (BagNewsNotes: July 2011)

Martin Parr: Harrow School (Magnum: July 2011)

Ed Kashi: Malawi (VII: July 2011)

Went to the Foto8 Summer Show opening at HOST gallery last Friday… Terrific work and a great night out…although, I might have got a bit too carried away with the drinking…Anyhow, check out all the work exhibited…The below photo by Dougie Wallace was Veronica’s favourite…I quite like it too…

photo: Dougie Wallace

Foto8 Summer Show 2011: Shortlisted (Foto8: July 2011) Feature on BBC

New Panos member Mads Nissen has been to Manila, Philippines for an interesting story about one of the most crowded cities in the world…

Mads Nissen : Among the Madding Crowd (Panos: July 2011) Philippines

Michael Sharkey: Young (Gay) Americans (Guardian: July 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen: Via PanAm (NYT Lens: July 2011)

William Daniels: Faded Tulips (Burn: July 2011) Kyrgyzstan

Yola Monakhov: Empire State (TIME LB: July 2011)

Tyler Hicks: Opportunities at Home Reduce Illegal Immigration From Mexico (NYT: July 2011)

Bryan Denton is back in Libya for NYT with writer Chris Chivers..

Bryan Denton: The Battle for a Libyan Village (NYT: July 2011) Great Libya coverage by the two over on At War blog

Atlantis Shuttle was launched past Friday…NYT sent Todd Heisler to take photos…Slideshow here…In relation to the Atlantis launch, I suppose, the Lens blog featured some of David Burnett’s terrific photos from the the launch of Apollo 11 in 1969…

David Burnett: Apollo 11 (NYT: July 2011)

Been interesting to note several big names getting their first sites during the last year or so…Christopher Morris, Gary Knight, Christopher Anderson…now Charles Ommanney has a website too…Do check out the tear sheets…There are a lot of them…Going through provides a stunning visual recap on contemporary history of U.S. Presidential politics…Love the other stuff too…

Charles Ommanney

Interviews and Talks

Giles Duley :  ”Bomb Took 3 Limbs, but Not Photographer’s Can-Do Spirit” (NYT: July 2011)

Stephanie Sinclair : The Lives of Child Brides (PBS.org: July 2011)

photo: Damon Winter

Kathy Ryan : New York Times Magazine (Le Lettre: 2011)

Bruce Davidson (Telegraph21: 2011)

Anton Corbijn (Foam: July 2011)

“I’m more interested in a photography that is ‘unfinished.’” – Paolo Pellegrin

Paolo Pellgerin (Today’s Zaman: July 2011)

John Szarkovski (Charlie Rose: 2005)

Jehad Nga (Wired Raw File blog: 2011)

Dominic Nahr (Vimeo: 2011)

Masaru Goto (Invisible Photographer Asia: 2011)

Olivia Arthur (e-photoreview: June 2011)

Amanda Rivkin (photographer’s blog: 2011)

Roof Unit Artists Preview 2 : Liz Hingley, Laura Hynd, Chloe Dewe Mathews : July 13 : Bethnal Green, London

Articles

NYT: Georgia – Photographers Still Jailed (NYT: July 2011)

Magnum to distribute Tim Hetherington’s archive…

Photo: Tim Hetherington

Magnum: News from Magnum: Magnum Photos to Distribute Archive of Tim Hetherington (Magnum: July 2011)

‘Debate’ around modern war photography continues over at Duckrabbit…Make sure to read the comments…

Duckrabbit: War Photographers’ biggest story: themselves part 1 \ part 2  (duckrabbit: July 2011)

Everybody’s was talking about Arles online last week…I’ve never been there… Need to try and make my way next year…Festival review by Guardian’s Sean O’Hagan….

Guardian: Les Rencontres d’Arles 2011 (Guardian: July 2011)  review Europe’s high-profile photography festival is a disjointed affair this year, but it’s worth making the trip to see the stunning showcase of Mexican work

Guardian: War photography? Isn’t there an app for that? (Guardian: July 2011) Two war photographers have used camera-phones and a simple app to record stunningly personal images of soldiers and locals in Afghanistan

Guardian: The month in photography (Guardian: July 2011) The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books, featuring Pieter Hugo, Vanessa Winship, Elliott Erwitt, Taryn Simon and Walker Evans.

Emphas.is: Crowdfunding vs Grants (Emphas.is blog: July 2011)

BBC:  Rediscovering the work of Ernst Haas, a master of colour (BBC: July 2011)

David Campbell: Photographic anxiety: should we worry about image abundance? (DC blog: July 2011)

Poynter: AP drops freelance photographer who Photoshopped his shadow out of image (Poynter: July 2011)

Marcus Bleasdale: A Fixer in Need: Good News from The Pastor (TIME LB: July 2011)

BJP: Leica partners with Facing Change collective (BJP: July 2011)

Anthony Suau: The Leica S2: On the Road with FCDA (FCDA blog: May 2011)

Stephen Farrell: Reporting Under Fire: a Survey of a Century of War Correspondents (NYT At War blog: June 2011)

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

From Guardian….Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse winners of  the Rencontred d’Arles Discovery Award.

Ian Parry Scholarship deadline extended to Thursday 14th July

NPPA Announces Short Grants For Photographers

Shortlist for 2011 IdeasTap Photographic Award

Oskar Barnack Award 2011 winners on Vimeo

Agencies 

Magnum Photos July Newsletter

From BJP….Picturetank, the Paris-based photo cooperative, is looking for photographers to join

Noor is looking for new members. Deadline 5 August

Magnum Photos have an opening for a sales role in their London office. Applications are open

Books

Seba Kurtis: Drowned (Here: 2011)

Platon’s Power gallery on Guardian website | article

Platon: Power (Chronicle: 2011) There’s also an app

WorkshopsEddie Adams Workshop : Class of 2011

To finish off…

Use an action to make any picture look like an instagram picture  Via @lucasjackson

Is this for real????

The iPhone SLR Mount.

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It’s all Egypt again, to start-off with…

Some of the best photos I’ve seen from Tahrir Square…

Features and Essays – Yuri Kozyrev: The Battle for Tahrir Square (TIME: February 2011)

Features and Essays – NYT (various photographers): From the Protests in Egypt (NYT: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Jacopo Quaranta: A Night in Tahrir Square (TIME February 2011)

TIME has also updated Dominic Nahr’s gallery I posted on Tuesday, with some new images..

Features and Essays – Dominic Nahr: The Clashes in Cairo (TIME: February 2011)

Features and Essays - Guy Martin: Clashes in Cairo (WSJ: February 2011)

It’s not surprising photographers are moving in small packs in conditions as in Cairo during this week and end up with similar photographs. It does however give an interesting opportunity to compare, how two photographers see and capture identical scenes….As pointed out by @melissalyttle, Dominic Nahr and Guy Martin for instance seem to have moved together as both of the two slideshows above include several photographs that have been taken as if the two men have been standing, in Lyttle’s words, “shoulder to shoulder”….See for yourself in the below examples…I find especially the first example striking… The two photographs are pretty much identical…only slight differences in contrast and saturation…About the photo of the man wiping blood off his head, I’m almost 100% certain we are looking at the same man, despite the fact his jacket does look different colour…this might be due to post processing… I’m pretty sure the wall is the same, and its colour is slightly different as well in the two photograps…

Dominic Nahr for TIME:

Guy Martin for Wall Street Journal:

Egypt in New Yorker Photo Booth…

Features and Essays - Kate Brooks: Postcard from Tahrir Square (New Yorker: February 2011)

Features and Essays - Joao Pina: Postcard form Tahrir Square (New Yorker: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Nadia Shira Cohen: Postcard from Tahrir Square (New Yorker: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Ron Haviv: Egypt (VII: February 2011)

From LA Times…

Features and Essays - Caroly Cole: Egypt (LA Times: February 2011) audio slideshow

Features and Essays – LA Times (Carolyn Cole and Michael Robinson Chavez): Protests in Egypt (LA Times: February 2011)

Features and Essays - Sean Smith: Egypt protests: events in Tahrir Square (Guardian: February 2011) Another Guardian gallery by various photographers

Great photos by Ivor Prickett on the Panos site…and it’s not 6×6…

Features and Essays – Ivor Prickett: Days of Anger (Panos: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Jason Larkin: Cairo’s Ornate (or Odd) Portals to the Past (NYT Lens: February 2011)

The harrasment of journalists and photographers has been worrying…

Articles – NYT Lens: Even the Middle Ground Is Perilous in Cairo (NYT Lens: February 2011)

Articles - PDN: Photographers Beaten, Robbed as Pro-Mubarak Gangs Turn on Press (PDN: February 2011)

Articles – MSNBC: Hotel staff take photojournalists’ cameras in Cairo (MSNBC: February 2011)

Interviews - Chris Hondros interview regarding the madness in Tahrir Square in Egypt (BagNewsNotes: February 2011)

Interviews - Magnum photographer Peter Van Agtmael tells of ordeal in Cairo’s streets (BJP: February 2011)

Interviews - Ron Haviv : Mob mentality creates dangerous conditions for protesters and journalists (MSNBC: February 2011)

Articles – Andrew Burton: Account of an Attack (Photographer’s blog: February 2011)

This is from week ago…

InterviewsScott Nelson (NYT Lens: February 2011)

NewsABCNews ongoing list of journalists arrested/injured/attacked/threatened in Cairo

I wondered how they all filed during the internet shut down..

Articles - PDN: From Egypt, Photographers Persisted in Filing Photos (PDN: February 2011)

Elsewhere in North Africa…

Features and Essays - Christian Als: Postcard from Algeria (New Yorker: February 2011)

Something completely different…

Features and Essays - Piotr Malecki: The Knacker’s Yard (Panos: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Alvaro Ybarra Zavala: Silent Murmur (Photographer’s website: 2011)

Features and Essays - Gerd Ludwig: Chernobyl (Huffington Post: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Jerome Sessini: Referendum in Southern Sudan (Reportage: February 2011)

Features and Essays - Tomas Lekfeldt: AfriChina (Moment Archive: 2011)

Features and Essays – David Moore: Inside London’s Secret Crisis-Command Bunker (Wired: February 2011)

MoviesHow to Make a Book With Steidl

Books – A Million Shillings – Escape from Somalia by Alixandra Fazzina is voted number 10 in a list of Amazon’s bestsellers in photojournalism

Awards - Sony World Photography Awards Finalists and Shortlisted (SWPA)

Awards – Announcement for female documentary photographers: The 2011 Inge Morath Award is now open for submissions

World Press Photo judging…

InterviewsDavid Burnett, Vince Aletti, Ruth Eichhorn and Heinz Kluetmeier : WPP judges (World Press Photo: February 2011)

Another great blog post by Burnett…A must read!

Articles – David Burnett: To Photography and To Photographers (Photographer’s blog: February 2011)

Anastasia is everywhere…and to my surprise it’s not 6×6 this time…

Articles - Verve: Anastasia Taylor-Lind (Verve: February 2011)

I heard by the way, that her Gaza Zoo feature is published in today’s Telegraph Magazine, if you are interested…

[NB. the below link did work when I was doing this post, but not when I later checked. Fingers crossed it's OK, again]

Articles – BJP: French retail chain offers three photojournalism grants (BJP: February 2011) FNAC, a French entertainment retail chain, has unveiled the recipients of its inaugural photojournalism grants with photographers Jan Banning, Cedric Gerbehaye and Anastasia Taylor-Lind each receiving €8000

Articles – BJP: New World Order : Images from the frontline of the recession by Christian Lutz, Marchand & Meffre, Ian Teh, etc (BJP: February 2011)

Articles / Tutorials – Joyel L: How to find a fixer (Photographer’s blog: February 2011)

Articles / Tutorials - Assignment Chicago: Two Essential Ingredients of Contest-Winning Photos (Chicago Tribune: February 2011)

Articles / Tutorials – Reuters: Want to know how to cover street protests? Here’s some useful photo tips and what to look out for (Reuters: February 2011)

A must read….

Articles – Justin Mott: Now What? Vol. 1: Why Being Busy Can Mean Being Broke (Photographer’s blog: February 2011)

Articles - Chip Litherland: i’ll just shoot some weddings (Photographer’s blog: February 2011)

Articles - Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Alexandre Meneghini (Guardian: February 2011)

AgenciesMagnum Photos February 2011 Newsletter

Multimedia - New issue of 1000 Words Magazine is out

MultimediaEverybody Street

Articles / Interviews - Misha Erwitt : The Woman in the ‘Family of Man’ Family (NYT Lens: February 2011)

Twitter accounts I’ve just started following…

Twitter - David Guttenfelder

TwitterScott Nelson

Twitter - Kevin German

Twitter - David Walter Banks

TwitterAutographABP

TwitterShit Photojournalists Like

Twitter - David Axelbank

JobsPanos seeks multi-media intern

Books – Phil Coomes: 64×64: Farewell to Kodachrome (Blurb)

WorkshopsWorkshop in Slovenia with Antonin Kratochvil and Marcus Bleasdale : March 2011 : Slovenia

To finish off, again, a joke: “Conan O’Brian’s advice to Egypt: “If you want people to stay at home and do nothing, you should turn the internet back on.”

As for me, I’m now going to turn off this computer and go cycling on the Brighton seafront. Even if it rains. Have a good weekend everybody.

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