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David Degner

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Residents of the besieged neighborhood of Khadeiye run through the streets to avoid snipers.  Sheets are hung and moved as the snipers move to try and block their view .
One of the members of the Free Army of Syria, and formerly a soldier in the Syrian Army, looks around a corner after hearing shots fired nearby in Khadeiya.  The collection of volunteers guard their neighborhood from inside houses as the Syrian Army fires at them from across the streets and high locations.
A well known wedding singer, whispers the words of a revolutionary song into the ears of children so they can sing them.
Water, and electricity have been cut since Khadeiya was taken by the opposition.  Now electricity is snuck in on clandestine power lines and water is distributed from old wells.
A member of the Free Syrian Army approaches the border of Khadeiya where the Syrian Army is firing on them.  Scattered machine gun fire can be heard coming from both sides but the real fear comes with the sound of artillery and RPGs.
Families have made a refugee camp out of an orphanage in Homs.  The only requirement is that a member of the family must have died or be in jail.  This room houses three families from beside Baba Amr, Homs.  After the fled the violence their houses were completely ransacked, allegedly by pro-government thugs.
In a house on the border of Baba Amr, Homs bullet holes riddle the walls and furniture.  Blocks of the city were abandoned and most shops were closed.
A small party is held in the center of Khadeiya where men and their children  come mainly to sing anti-government songs and dance.
One of the soldiers of the Syrian Free Army is brought into a makeshift hospital after he was hurt in an explosion.  The small clinic is the only one left after 3 other hospitals and clinics were shelled.
One of the officers of the Free Syrian Army sits with his family in their home in Khadeiya.  He is unusual for keeping his family in the middle of the bullet riddled neighborhood.  But he is too well know as a member of the opposition and as he says
Many of the remaining people and cars of Kahdeiya have been shot multiple times.    This soldier showed me 3 bullet holes.  One doctor showed me the 9 times he has been wounded while retrieving patients in their makeshift ambulance.
The main square of Khadeiya is pitted with holes from mortars and explosives.  At one time this square was used for organizing anti-government protests where many were originally killed.
A small party is held in the center of Khadeiya where men and their children  come mainly to sing anti-government songs and dance.
One of the residents of Khadeiya, Homs was shot in the legs by a sniper after leaving the evening protest.   After being patched up in the clinic he returned to the protest to tell his friends he is ok.
Damascus, Syria

Draft.

This report does not give an accurate description of all Syria’s current complexity. It is a look at one opposition neighborhood for one day.

After a year of intense fighting and low level suppression many parts of Khaldeya have bullet holes, the cars, the walls, the water tanks, the people. This suburb of Homs has been emptied of families and filled with bullet holes. The doctor that runs out to pick up wounded has 9 bullet holes. Sheets are hung in the street to block the view of snipers are like swiss cheese.

I was given one of the rare 7 day visas to enter Syria as a journalist. I wasn’t the best journalist to be sent, my expertise is Egypt, my Arabic language is Egyptian. But thanks to a good fixer and some digging we were able to travel around Homs relatively freely.

Getting into Khaldeya required a local guide and some quick driving down a road with a history of snipers. The bullet holes in other cars confirmed that sometimes they were shot. While in the neighborhood shots ring out at irregular intervals

The rebels are very aware of the Syrian government’s storyline that they are gangs of terrorists and were more than willing to show us around. Often when I start talking with a soldier he will pull out his army ID and go into the story of how he escaped.

Most of the soldiers claim that their weapons came from defecting soldiers, though they have had to buy ammunition from anywhere they can.

There was one former Syrian Army officer who told of how his brother was walking home from the first protest in Khaldeya when a sniper shot him through the stomach. At that moment he decided to defect and join the rebels. Now he is too well known so he stays with his family, unwilling to send them away. “I would rather have them die here with me than away from me” he says.

To defend their neighborhood the volunteers have smashed holes through the walls of the homes. A maze of paths are opened and closed as they move around the inside. As I move with them they aren’t so afraid of bullets as of the RPGs.

In one of the few houses with electricty a few volunteers write songs for the evening’s protest. It’s an almost daily event of a few men and children gathering in a central location. A couple of famous wedding singers lead the festivities.

One of the residents left the party early, half an hour later he was driven back in an ambulance, with fresh bandages. A sniper had shot him through the legs on his way home.

The rebellion in Syria is one of the most complex of the revolutions of the Arab spring. It isn’t a peacefull protest in a square, or violent fight from east to west, or easily described along majority, minority sectarian lines. It has many fronts, many divided families, is partially peaceful, partially violent, and has no clear majority of people or power. It also has many neighbors that want to influence the outcome.

This complexity is undercovered partially because there were relatively few foreign journalists based in Syria to start with and now it is excedingly hard for journalists to get in for long term coverage.

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Couple of weeks again since last updates..Been busy with some assignments and with a move from East London to Turnpike Lane which has left me wireless at home until mid-March which in turn means updating the blog is a bit of a hassle until then….Lots to share… So much going on during the last three weeks…World Press Photo…POYi, and of course the tragedies in Syria…

Features and Essays

From NatGeoMag March issue… Ed Kashi from Marseille, France….

Ed Kashi: Marseille’s Melting Pot (NGM) Edit on VII Photo. Surprised to see it there already. I would imagine there’s an embargo since NGM is still on the newsstands.

Brent Stirton’s World Press Photo winning Rhino Wars…

Brent Stirton: Rhino Wars (NGM)

Lynn Johnson: The Apostles (NGM)

Had just been thinking that hadn’t seen Dominic Nahr’s work in Time recently, and then two latest issues had work… from Egypt and Senegal…

Dominic Nahr: Revolution Lost (Lightbox) Egypt

Dominic Nahr: Senegal Spring (Lightbox)

Paolo Marchetti: Gangs of Port-au-Prince (Newsweek)

Andrea Bruce: Refugee Camps in Afghanistan (NYT Lens)

New York Times Magazine has a special photo issue on London coming up this Sunday…A lot of the work can be seen online…Would love to get my hands on the hard copy… Know a newsagent in Soho that usually get Sunday’s NYT on Tuesday…Costs £10 though….

Mark Neville: Here is London (NYT Mag)

Really enjoyed these portraits…

Gareth McConnell: Migratory Models (NYT Mag)

Lightbox has updated its Syria gallery by Romenzi…

Alessio Romenzi: Syrian Civil War (Lightbox)

Jehad Nga: Tripoli (NYT) Libya

Davide Monteleone: Libya’s Teachers, Schools, and Children After Gaddafi (Newsweek)

David Degner: Bahrain’s Stillborn Revolution (Photographer’s website)

Jorge Uzon: A Personal Landscape in Patagonia (NYT Lens)

Andrew Cutrano: Michigan Primary (Lightbox)

Matt Slaby: Being Latino in Arizona (TIME)

Marco Grob: Faces of the Latino Vote (Lightbox)

Stephen Crowley: Politics Photos (NYT Lens)

Mitch Epstein: Trees in the Urban Jungle (NYT Mag)

Damon Winter: Stella McCartney at Work (NYT Magazine)

Two really strong series by Panos photographer Mads Nissen…

Mads Nissen: Giving Life, Risking Life (Panos)

Mads Nissen: Ouma’s Wedding (Panos)

Adam Dean: Me N Ma Girls (Panos)

Ton Koene: Afghan Police Recruits (zReportage)

Robert Frank: Unseen New York Photos (NYT Lens)

Larry Towell: Faces of the Taliban (CNN)

Ernesto Bazan: Cuba (Lightbox)

Rob Hornstra: Sochi Singers (Lightbox)

Donald Weber: A Gun to Your Head: Inside Post-Soviet Interrogation Rooms (Lightbox)

Have to be honest, if these photos had not been taken by Parr, probably wouldn’t have paid any attention to them…

Martin Parr: Frozen Face of Minnesota (Start Tribune) Related

Gerd Ludwig: Long Shadow of Chernobyl (Boston Globe)

Eirini Vourloumis: Greek Austerity (NPR)

Peter Dench: A Decade of England Uncensored (CNN)

Kristoffer Tripplaar : Post Offices (NYT Lens)

Stefano De Luigi: Homeland (VII)

Sim Chi Yin: China’s Petitioners (VII Mentor)

Damir Sagolj: Myanmar’s War on Opium (The Atlantic)

Always an inspiration…Look at Paolo Pellegrin’s retrospective…

Paolo Pellegrin: Retrospective (Magnum)

Zhang Xiao: China’s Changing Coastlines (Lightbox)

Kate Nolan: The Young Women of Kaliningrad (Foto8)

Anoek Steketee: Amusement Parks in Rwanda (Lightbox)

Lucas Jackson: American Embassy in Baghdad (NYT)

JB Russell: Reconstructing Iraq (Panos)

Jason Andrew: On the Road with the Tea Party Express (New Yorker)

Tina Remiz: The Place Where I Am Not (Firecracker)

Kenneth O’Halloran: Ireland’s Ghost Estates (NYT Mag)

Daniel Cuthbert: First On Scene: Paramedics in South Africa (Photographer’s website) multimedia

Bruce Gilden: Foreclosures, Las Vegas & Reno (Magnum in Motion)

Pavel Prokopchik: Apashka: The Last dervish of Kazakhstan (Foto8)

Tomasz Szustek: Ireland in the Time of Recession (Uspecto)

Lauren Fleishman: Love Ever After (Lightbox)

Misha Friedman: Tuberculosis (NYT Lens)

Victor Blue: Disappeared in Guatemala (CNN)

Oded Balilty: Ultra Orthodox Jewish wedding in Israel

Jean Gaumy: One year after the Fukushima disaster (Magnum)

Interviews

Canon USA has done more interviews with VII Photo members… John Stanmeyer looking rather mad-professor-y..

Canon: VII Photo interviews

Yuri Kozyrev : At Home on Revolution’s Road (NYT Lens)

Alex Webb : Chicago (Leica blog)

Samuel Aranda : World Press Photo Winner (BJP)

Brent Stirton (BJP)

Aidan Sullivan : WPP (BJP)

Donald Weber (BJP)

New Statesman’s photo editor Rebecca McClelland interviewed Don McCullin….

Don McCullin (New Statesman)

Ragnar Axelsson (Ideas Tap)

Lynsey Addario (Canadian Business)

Lynsey Addario (Women’s Media Center)

Jodi Bieber (A Photo Editor)

Anthony Shadid : Arab Spring (SCPR)

Guy Martin : Arab Spring (MSNBC)

Lise Sarfati (ASX)

Alec Soth (Sartorialist)

Christopher Anderson (ASX)

Peter Dench (PicBod)

Rob Hornstra (BJP)

Tomas van Houtryve (PDN)

Anja Niedringhaus (AP photo blog)

Peter DiCampo (BBC)

Tomasz Lazar : Turning Point (NYT Lens)

Temo Bardzimashvili : Turning Point (NYT Lens)

Articles

R.I.P. Anthony Shadid. Such a great journalist.

photo: Ed Ou

NYT: Anthony Shadid, Reporter in the Middle East, Dies at 43

NYT: Remembering Anthony Shadid

NYT: ‘House of Stone,’ a Memoir by Anthony Shadid

New Yorker: Remembering Anthony Shadid

Rest in Peace. Marie Colvin and Remi Ochlik

Marie Colvin. photo: Ivor Prickett

NYT: Two Western Journalists Killed in Syria Shelling

NYT: Parting Glance: Rémi Ochlik

Lightbox: Remi Ochlik Tribute in Images

“I expected to see horrible things. Yes, I was afraid” – Remi Ochlik

Guardian: Remi Ochlik

NYT: Conflict Reporting in the Post-Embed Era

Frontline Club: Freelance News Safety Survey

Robert Fisk: The heroic myth and the uncomfortable truth of war reporting (Independent)

NYT: Two Wars, Seen Many Ways

PDN: Remembering the 13 Syrians who died while rescuing a photojournalist

Kent Kobersteen: What it Takes to be a National Geographic Photographer (The Photo Society)

Kathy Ryan reflects on the New York Times Magazine’s London issue and finding young talent…

“A photographer should try to present something clear, deliberate” – Kathy Ryan

Kathy Ryan: London in Pictures (NYT Mag 6th Floor blog)

Related to an earlier NYT Mag issue…

NYT Mag 6th Floor blog: Fiddling With the Irish Cover

World Press Photo related…

Big congratulations to Samuel Aranda for his World Press Photo of the Year!

NYT: World Press Photo Winner

NYT: Samuel Aranda Meets the Subjects of His Award Winning Photo

WPPY winner Samuel Aranda talked to NYT Lens in December about working in Yemen under cover

“Can We See Through Symbols?” No Caption Needed blog wrote in October about Aranda WPPY’s image

BBC News: The story behind the World Press Photo

David Campbell: This photo is not just what it is: reading the World Press Photo debate

BJP: World Press Photo: Does the winning image reference Michelangelo’s Pietà?

Pietà by Michelangelo and Samuel Aranda’s World Press Photo of the Year next to each other:

BJP: World Press Photo: What was missing from this year’s entries?

BJP: World Press Photo: A judge’s top tips for future entrants

Every World Press Photo winners from 1955-2011

POYi related…

photo: Yuri Kozyrev

NYT Lens: At Home and Away: Pictures of Year

PDN: Yuri Kozyrev Wins POYi’s 2011 Freelance Photographer of the Year Award

New Yorker: Desert Island Books by Peter van Agtmael

How to by PDN….

PDN: How to land environmental portrait assignments

PDN: How I Got That Job: John McDermott’s adidas Assignment

PDN: Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Andrew Lichtenstein on the Aftermath Project Grant

PDN: All the New Work That’s Fit to Print

PDN: Ten favorite photo accessories

Dench on Parr: ” Since winning first prize at his camera club, he has never submitted work for a competition or consideration for a festival. Prizes are bestowed; inclusion in festivals requested”

Peter Dench: In Conversation With Martin Parr (Photographer’s blog)

Nowness: Juergen Teller Exposed

Lightbox: The Disappearing Afghan Box Camera

DVA Foto: Jon Stewart slams Time Magazine (and Pellegrin’s cover image)

NYT: ‘Hell and Back Again’ Shows War Stories Don’t End When War Movies Do

Lightbox Tumblr: Paolo Pellegrin shooting Italian PM [video]

NYT Mag 6th Floor blog: Erasing ‘The Americans’

NYT Mag 6th Floor blog: Snapshots of the Famous

photo: Jared Moossy

NYT Lens: Turning Art Into Activism

Mike Davis: What do learn from photojournalism contests

Reuters: Editing the Oscars (Reuters photo blog)

Yossi Milo Gallery: Yossi Milo Gallery Announces Exclusive Representation of The Estate of Tim Hetherington

Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Kieran Doherty

Guardian: Featured photojournalist Susana Vera

Wayne Ford: Year in Development — celebration of photographic printers’ art

Verve: Laura Boushnak

Verve: Olof Jarlbro

Verve: Dörthe Hagenguth

Verve: Philip Gostelow

Verve: Ross McDonnell

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

World Press Photo of the Year

Photo: Samuel Aranda

World Press Photo: 2012 Contest gallery

Pictures of the Year International : Winner 2012 galleries

Congrats to all the photographers chosen for this year’s PDN 30!

photo: Ilvy Njiokiktjien

PDN:’30′ 2012

Lightbox: James Nachtwey receives Dresden International Peace Prize and Wim Wenders presents the award

PDN: Moriyama, Ai Weiwei to Be Honored at ICP Infinity Awards

PDN: AP’s Charles Dharapak wins Photographer of the Year in White House News Photogs Assn. contest

Inge Morath Award 2012

Emerging Photographer Fund 2012

CPN: Editor’s Choice by New Statesman Photo editor Rebecca McClelland

BJP: Photographers Leonora Hamill and Eric Pillot have won this year’s HSBC Photography Prize

Photocrati Fund : April 1

Photo Contests and Grants Calendar

Agencies and Collectives

VII Photo : Newsletter

Magnum Foundation Winter 2012 Newsletter

Prime Collective : Newsletter

Statement Images : New Members

Crowd Funding

Redux Pictures: John Keatley and Arts Aftercare needs your help!

Festivals

Visa Pour l’Image : How to Participate

multiMedia

Polka Magazine

Once Magazine If you wanna pitch stories… go here

Jobs

MSNBC : Picture Editor

MSNBC : Paid Intern Picture Editor

AP Interns

Magnum : Head of Licensing and Content Syndication

Photographers

Alessio Romenzi

Andrew Cutrano

Jorge Uzon

Ton Koene

Pavel Prokopchik

Jan Dago

New Tumblr blog “The Brazilian Far West” by Sebastian Liste….

Sebastian Liste : blog

Andreas Laszlo Konrath

Tom Broadbent

Kate Nolan

Kalle Koponen

Meeri Koutaniemi

To finish off… Don McCullin + iPad = FAIL

and The ultimate analysis on Samuel Aranda’s WPPY

and a great response to a letter asking for money

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Features and Essays

Occupy Wall Street… Terrific photos by Ashley Gilbertson…

Ashley Gilbertson: #Occupy Wall Street (VII) Gilbertson’s earlier Wall Street series: Down on Wall Street and After the Fall

Spencer Heyfron: Faces of Occupy Wall Street (Newsweek) Heyfron’s website

Nina Berman: Beyond the Fringe of Protest (NYT Lens)

From Chicago…

Jon Lowenstein: Occupy Chicago (NOOR)

Guillermo Cervera: Trading War for Waves (NYT Lens) Cervera’s archive

Brent Stirton: Virus Hunter (TIME Lightbox)

Libya…

Jehad Nga: Return to Libya (TIME Lightbox)

Michael Christopher Brown: Libya After Gaddafi (Newsweek)

Bryan Denton: Pictures from a Rebellion (Corbis blog) Libya

Afghanistan..

Ben Lowy: Life During Wartime (NYT Mag) | 6th Floor blog: Hipstamatic in Kabul

Larry Towell: Afghanistan 2011. Part II (Magnum)

Last Friday, President Barack Obama announced complete withdrawal of US forces from Iraq by the end of 2011…

In August, the New York Times took a look back at the war in Iraq on the frontlines and at home in the US…I don’t think I ever shared the slideshow…Various photographers’ work included…Below frame from Todd Heisler’s iconic Final Salute…(Remember seeing it first time as it was exhibited in Berlin as part of the touring World Press Photo 2006 exhibition, and being really amazed by it. Actually another Iraq series from the same exhibition, by Peter van Agtmael,  is etched in my memory as well. I saw the WPP 2006 show literally two weeks before I began studying photojournalism, so it had special impact.)

photo: Todd Heisler

New York Times (various photographers): Iraq: Drawing Down and Moving Ahead (NYT)

Mauricio Lima: The Circus Comes to Baghdad (NYT)

Ayman Oghanna: Iraqis (Photo Booth)

Last week I posted a link to Stephanie Sinclair’s Hillary’s Angels on VII…This week we have Diana Walker’s photos of Hillary herself on Lightbox. The series is also TIME cover story on all markets…Lightbox slideshow opens with a frame that is printed double spread in the magazine…

Diana Walker: Hillary Clinton (LightBox)

Lynsey Addario: Road Trip (VII)

Lynsey Addario: Somali-Kenyan Famine (VII)

Moises Saman: Awaiting Tunisia’s Vote (NYT)

Tomas van Houtryve: Open Secret (VII Magazine)

Nancy Borowick: Mother’s Cancer (TIME Lightbox)

Alberto Maserin: Portraits of Priests (TIME Lightbox)

Timothy Fadek: Chongqing, China (Polka) “The biggest city you’ve never heard of.”

Abbie Trayler-Smith: The BRIT School (Panos)

Kacper Kowalski: Winter (Panos)

Jack Delano: Puerto Rico (NYT Lens)

Larry Fink: Vanity Fair’s Oscar parties (Photo Booth)

Lara Platman: Harris Tweed (BBC)

Toby Smith: Energy in China (NYT Lens)

Edward Burtynsky: View From Above  (Lightbox)

David Degner: Egypt’s Unfinished Revolution (FT Magazine)

Mustafah Abdulaziz & Justin Maxon: Providence (Vimeo)

Mikolaj Nowacki: Parting (VII Mentor)

Will Hartley: In Between Dreams (Foto8)

Interviews and Talks


Martine Franck (WSJ)

Check out DevelopPhoto’s Vimeo…

Develop Photo Vimeo Channel for Photography related videos  (DevelopPhoto Vimeo) Includes recent videos of photographers such as Ed Kashi, Donald Weber, and Peter van Agtmael speaking about the future of photography. Those originally from PhotoQ’s series Facing the Future here.

Dominic Nahr (The Fader)

Lars Tunbjork (New Yorker Photo Booth)

Ron Haviv (Takepart.com)

Juergen Teller (BJP) Teller on  his controversial shoot with Kristen McMenamy for 032c magazine.

Ziyah Gafic (PDN)

Matt Eich (Conscientious Extended)

Rankin (IdeasTap)

Shannon Jensen (10Answers) Jensen is one of the recent additions to Reportage by Getty Images Emerging Talent. Her portfolio here.

Articles

photo: Nicole Tung

Mike Kamber: On Young Photographers and Conflict’ in Libya (NYT Lens) On photographing conflict for the first time

Russia Beyond the Headlines: Yuri Kozyrev: Walking the revolution road 

photo: Franco Pagetti

Telegraph: Baptism of fire: the story of the VII photo agency (Telegraph) When seven photojournalists decided to join forces, it was just days before 9/11 happened. Their role has been in sharp focus ever since

Gizmodo: How to Be a Citizen Journalist Without Getting Killed

Flavorwire:  A Look at Patti Smith’s First Major Photography Exhibition, ‘Camera Solo’

Toronto Star Photo Blog: Rick Madonik tells about his Libyan fixer

Capital New York: For Tim Hetherington’s close friend and ‘Restrepo’ subjects, mounting a South Bronx gallery show of the late photographer’s work becomes a tribute

PDN: What do you charge for editorial retouching, and how? (PDN)

Telegraph: Photography at the V&A

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist Adnan Abidi 

New Yorker Photo Booth:  Great Mistakes, Vanessa Winship’s favorite accidental photo

IJNet: Five Google tools journalists don’t use but should

Source: Top Ten Tips on getting the most of your photography degree

Penumbra Project: Surviving as a photographer in the new economy

photo: Eli Reed

Magnum: Advice for young photographers – part 3 (IdeasTap)

Joerg Colberg: What Happened to the Mid-Career Artist (Conscientious)

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.23: Gaddafi’s death

David Campbell: Agencies as publishers: a new approach to photojournalism (DC blog)

Marco Bohr: Google Street View and the Politics of Exploitation (Visual Culture Blog)

Verve: Valerio Bispuri (Verve)

Also in new breed of documentary photographers.. Chien Chi-Chang (Verve)… ahem…

Guardian: Occupy London empty tent claims based on ‘rubbish science’  (Guardian) Scientist specialising in camouflage said photographers with thermal imaging equipment were not using right camera settings

Adam Westbrook: 10 common video storytelling mistakes (and how to avoid them) (AW blog)

Adam McCauley: Covering 9/11 with Ashley Gilbertson (Storify)

BJP: The Third Floor Gallery is Cardiff is looking for £12,000 to expand

BJP: Spotlight on crowdfunding: Photographer Neil Osborne is raising funds to document how one man saved the Black Turtle

BJP: The London Street Photography Festival + Grant Smith to present “Stand Your Ground” at BJP’s Vision

BJP: The Open Eye Gallery is reopening in new premises. BJP asks the director and curator what we can expect to see

Petapixel: Adobe Image Deblurring Done on Capa’s Famous D-Day Photo

Videos

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #3

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #2

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #1

Page One : Inside The New York Times : trailer

Vicki Bennett: Deconstructing the way we perceive space in cinema (Contact Editions)

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

Andrea Morales Wins TIME’s Next Generation Photography Contest | Morales’ website

FotoVisura Grant. The deadline is December 5, 2011.

PhotoPhilantrophy Grant Rounds Schedule

Blogs

NPPA Visual Student

Crowd funding

Go and support my friend Amanda’s project…She’s already past the halfway mark…

Amanda Rivkin : BTC Oil Pipeline (Emphas.is)

Events and Exhibitions


Giles Duley : Becoming the Story : Artist Talk: Wednesday 2 November 6-9pm (talk starts at 7pm) Private View: Thursday 3 November  7 – 9pm Exhibition Runs: 4 – 26 November : KK Outlet : London

Hell and Back Again by Danfung Dennis : Screening : November 7 :  Foto8 :  London

Amazon : exhibition in aid of Sky Rainforest Rescue : Somerset House, London :  photography from Sebastião Salgado and Per Anders Pettersson

Magnum Photos symposium to discuss the role of contact sheets in photograph :  26 November : London

The Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar

Jobs

MediaStorm’s Spring Internship : Deadline November 1

B&H is hiring a full-time Photo Related Blogger

NPR : assistant producer for multimedia

Reuters freelance TV news producer

Agencies and Collectives

Statement Images is looking for new members

Zeppelin

Photographers

Suzanne Lee

Jussi Puikkonen

Tania Lee Crow

As a final note… Busiest day so far on the blog last Friday with 2,870 views and looks like October is on its way of becoming to be the month with most traffic ever…around 37,000 views…Thanks for visiting.

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Features 

Now know why I couldn’t find Chien-Chi Chang’s Burma work in May when writing about this year’s Visa Pour l’image program….It’s only being published now… in National Geographic Magazine’s August issue…

Chien-Chi Chang: Land of Shadows (NGM: August 2011) Burma

Somalia drought in the news…

Tyler Hicks: Fleeing Somalia’s Drought (NYT: July 2011)

Robin Hammond: Drought Crisis in Somalia (Guardian: July 2011)

South Sudan….

Francesco Zizola: South Sudan on the Eve of Independence (NOOR: July 2011)

Dominic Nahr: Republic of South Sudan Gains Independence (Magnum: July 2011)

Cedric Gerberhaye: Land of Cush (Magnum Emergency Foundation: July 2011) Sudan

I had a quick look at the latest New Yorker issue at my local newsagents’ the other day…It had, what must have been a 10,000 word, article by Philip Gourevitch on Rwandan cycling team…Photos by Dominic Nahr… Only two frames tho, unless I counted wrong…double spread of the below image to open the piece and then another….Would have expected more photos to be used for such a long piece, but then again, New Yorker is pretty word heavy magazine…Luckily we can see 10 frames on their brilliant Photo booth….

Dominic Nahr: Rwandan Cycling Team (New Yorker: July 2011)

Sven Torfinn: In Sierra Leone, Widened Access to Health Care Saves Lives (NYT: July 2011)

KC Ortiz: West Papuan Rebels (Newsweek: July 2011)

Libya…

Plenty of Katie Orlinsky’s photos in the latest Visura Magazine… Do make sure to also read the text…

Katie Orlinsky: Libya (Visura Magazine: July 2011)

Bryan Denton: As Rebels Capture Towns, Destruction Follows (NYT: July 2011)

David Degner: Libyans Live With 5 Months of War (MSNBC: July 2011) More on Degner’s website

I was checking on the VII website yesterday whether there were any features I hadn’t seen… Nothing new on the front page, but plenty on the VII Network page… The VII front page does often feature series by the Network photographers, but not all of them… not quite sure what is the criteria,as for instance Lynsey Addario’s new work is pretty much always on the VII front page…including the  recent Five-Star Delhi…The below Bhutan work wasn’t tho.. Anyway, have to remember to keep checking the Network page more often…Although, VII is closing the Network soon…Guess it’ll all be clearer then…

Lynsey Addario: Bhutan (VII Network: July 2011)

Jessica Dimmock: Gossip Girls (VII Network: July 2011)

Seamus Murphy: Chinese Tourists in Italy (VII Network: July 2011)

VII Network members from Afghanistan…

Tivadar Domaniczky: Living with the 1-8 (VII Network: 2011) Afghanistan

Eric Bouvet: French Commandos (VII Network: 2011) Afganistan

Also Afghanistan…

Charles Ommanney: Petraeus’s Final Days in Afghanistan (Newsweek: July 2011)

Balazs Gardi: Afghanistan with iPhone (bewaremag.com: July 2011)

Chloe Dewe Matthews: The Caspian Sea (Panos: July 2011)

Alinka Echeverria: The Road To Tepeyac (Foto8: July 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen: Gold Fever (NOOR: July 2011)

Nina Berman: September 11: The Afterglow (NOOR)

Sergio Ramazzotti: The Interpreter (Parallelo Zero Vimeo: 2011)

Magnum Photos: Tour de France (Magnum in Motion: July 2011)

Mark Redondo: In God’s Hands (Visura: July 2011)

Gordon Parks: F.S.A. (NYT Lens: July 2011)

Colombia…

Alvaro Ybarra Zavala: Hunting FARC (Reportage by Getty Images: July 2011)

Franco Pagetti: Women’s Prison (VII Magazine: July 2011) Colombia

Carlotta Zarattini: Cambodia (NYT Lens: July 2011)

Kenneth O’Halloran: Living with Alzheimer’s (TIME LB: July 2011)

Gabriela Bulisova: Formerly Incarcerated Women (Al Jazeera English: July 2011) US Prison System

Martin Usborne: Dog’s in Cars (TIME: LB: July 2011)

Daniel Etter: Syria  - A Revolution Silenced (Photographer’s website: 2011)

Kosuke Okahara: Inevitable Moment (Photographer’s website: 2011) Cairo

Events - Frontline Club Photography Network Party : 20 July : London

multiMedia

New issue of Visura Magazine is available online

Viceland Photo Issue

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

This year’s Ian Parry Scholarship winner and finalists have been announced….

Ian Parry Scholarship Winner and Finalists (pdf) (Ian Parry Scholarship press release: July 2011)

BJP: Landscape first for Ian Parry Scholarship (BJP: July 2011)

Ed Ou wins the City of Perpignan Young Reporter Award for his Children of Men work (BJP: July 2011)

Congratulations to all the winners in the Press Photographers’ Year competition…

photo: Adam Dean  | First Prize: photo essay

The Press Photographers’ Year 2011 : Winners’ list :  Slideshow of Winning work

The winner of the 2011 Inge Morath, Zhe Che (Ingemorath.org: July 2011)

Open Society Documentary Photography Project announces Moving Walls 19 photographers (soros.org: July 2011)

Articles

More on Arles…

Francis Hodgson: Arles the fun of the fair (FT: July 2011)

Ben Burbridge: Arles 2011 (Photoworks blog: 2011)

Doug Mills shooting stills and video at the same time…crazy shiiiit….

NYT Lens: Doug Mills : Shooting Twice at Once (NYT Lens: July 2011)

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: David Azia (Guardian: July 2011)

Verve: Stefano de Luigi (Verve Photo: July 2011)

Photoshelter: 11 Content Ideas for Your Photo Blog (Photoshelter: July 2011)

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.20: Famine iconography as a sign of failure (DC blog: July 2011)

David Campbell: Imaging Famine: a debate (DC blog: July 2011)

Guardian: Why you are the future of photography (Guardian: July 2011) A new show suggests that webcams, Google Street View and a cat named Nancy Bean are set to change the world of photography as we know it

BJP: Sports Photography: Breaking the waves (BJP: June 2011)

Getting Started in Google Plus: A Photographer’s Guide (Piziq.com)

Jehad Nga writes about his father on TIME Lightbox…

Jehad Nga: 1960′s Libya: A Glimpse of Life Before Gaddafi (TIME LB: July 2011)

Interviews

Lynsey Addario (NPR: July 2011)

Alec Soth (Hereontheweb: July 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen (I Am Nikon blog: 2011)

Edward Burtynsky (Themorningnews.org: 2011)

Donald Weber (DVA foto: July 2011)

David Walter Banks (NPR: 2011)

Daro Sulakauri (NYT Lens: July 2011) Sulakauri’s website

Katie Orlinsky (Youtube: 2011)

Leonie Hampton (Ideastap: July 2011)

Don McCullin (BBC: 2011)

Taryn Simon (Guardian: May 2011)

Platon (BBC Radio: July 2011)

Mishka Henner (Telegraph: July 2011)

Tessa Bunney (e-photoreview: July 2011)

Charles Ommanney and Brooks Kraft (Youtube:  2004)

Books

Pieter Hugo: Permanent Error book review on BJP (BJP: June 2011)

Taryn Simon: A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters on book review on Foto8 (Foto8: July 2011)

Photographers 

Nick Ballon

Christina Theisen

Polly Braden

Zhe Chen

Jon Browning

Kate Hooper

To finish off…. Check out  Cathal McNaughton‘s contemporary take on Elliott Erwitt classic below…I saw McNaughton’s frame on a Reuters slideshow on Northern Ireland…

And two videos demonstrating the rolling shutter effect….

iPhone video enhanced by rolling shutter effect

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David Degner / www.IncendiaryImage.com

Derna, a city famous for the large number of fighters that traveled to Iraq and Afghanistan now sends many of its young men to fight on the front in Libya. Many people describe the lack of freedom, opportunity, and government abuse as pushing the youth toward violent international jihads but now the trend has changed. Young men are either going to fight against Gaddafi or staying in the city in hopes of the future opportunity.

Meredith Birkett writes

 

For five months, we've covered the war in Libya. As with many news stories that wear on for weeks, months and years, the imagery can start repeating itself. Rebels in stark desert positions. Pro-Gadhafi gatherings in Tripoli. The sad human toll shown through suffering in hospital wards.

So when photojournalist David Degner decided to move in the opposite direction of the fighting, to see what was going on elsewhere in Libya, we appreciated seeing this new facet of the country. Degner wrote to msnbc.com:

Before the revolution Libya was commonly known as the place defined by "Gadhafi." Now its definition consists of "Gadhafi and rebellion." Since I rushed into Libya with other journalists in February, most photos coming from Libya have only reinforced this simple definition, but of course, Libya's history and psyche is much more complex than the simplified war images we see.

So now, I have returned to try and learn more and explore the small towns in peaceful eastern Libya. The eastern towns near the Mediterranean Coast are never more than a few hours drive from the fighting front near the middle of the country.

For a country at war the east is surprisingly secure and unified on the surface and as far down as I could dig. But the effects of the war are still felt every day with funerals, a lack of hard currency and electricity cuts.

Each crisis comes on the individual level, from the farmer that can't reach his normal markets in Tripoli to the father that can't find a hospital to treat his daughter's rare illness.

See the rest of Degner's images in a slideshow.

 

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After days of media blackout and unconfirmed reports of a bloody, but successful, uprising against Col. Moammar Gadhafi in Libya, David Degner’s photographs provide a view of the aftermath of fighting in Baida, eastern Libya.

All photographs taken Feb. 23, 2011, by David Degner for The Wall Street Journal

In Baida, as in many cities in Libya’s east, flags flew from the era before Gadhafi Wednesday. The days-long fight for Baida began in the first days of anti-Gadhafi protests last week.

Wednesday, a day after the last forces loyal to Col. Gadhafi in eastern Libya were defeated, Baida’s elders met in the town’s assembly hall to begin rebuilding.


Police, witnesses say, initially clashed with protesters in Baida using tear gas and other non-lethal methods. When protests swelled, Col. Gadhafi’s government ordered in reinforcements. Here, anti-Gadhafi protesters demonstrated outside city hall Wednesday.

Local police turned on the soldiers after the soldiers opened fire on unarmed civilians. The government forces retreated to Al Abrak Airport, outside of town. Townsmen followed and laid siege to the airport. Here, the remains of a battle are scattered in the terminal.

Baida’s airport, the site of some of the fiercest fighting of the uprising in eastern Libya. For four days, rebels battled forces loyal to Col. Gadhafi and commanded by one of his sons.


Spent bullet casings litter the ground at Al Abrak airport in eastern Libya.

After days of firefights, feints and an ambush on unarmed local sheiks, the regime forces surrendered their hold on the vital local airport Tuesday morning.


Evidence of previous days’ fighting at Al Abrak airport.

Ad hoc local forces—who, like citizens across eastern Libya, became heavily armed as entire army units joined forces with locals and police stations were abandoned—fought off government troops.

Witnesses say locals countered the government helicopters with anti-aircraft machine guns and Kalashnikovs.

Here, civilians displayed the guns and ammunition that they claim to have taken from mercenary soldiers in a fight.

A key challenge facing elders in Baida now is how to rein in the revolutionary zeal of the region’s youth, who are charged with emotion after several days of violent battle culminating in an historic victory.

Wednesday, Masouda al-Alamy, a distinguished professor of animal science at the city’s Omar Mukhtar University, called the meeting of elders to order. “Today, we meet and can speak freely for the first time,” she said. Here, Sheikh Mohamad Darnawi, right, spoke.

Local notables, including tribal sheikhs, university professors and prominent businessmen, met in a domed town meeting hall ringed with green plush seats.

The top items on the agenda at Wednesday’s meeting included forming committees to take charge of security, food and fuel distribution, reopening schools, and collecting weapons pillaged during the protests.

Recently resigned Minister of Justice Mustapha Mohammed Abdul Jalil was given a position of prominence on the dais at Wednesday’s meeting.


Prisoners, who say they are Libyans from Sabah, Tripoli, and Fazan were captured in fighting against anti-Gadhafi forces.


These captured pro-Gadhafi fighters told the photographer they were from Chad, seeming to confirm previous reports that Col. Gadhafi has employed foreign fighters to swell the ranks of his army and put down the uprising against his rule.


A young doctor in Baida hospital shares images he recorded on his cell phone of the dead and wounded from the previous days’ fighting. According to the head of the hospital 63 people died during the uprising and hundreds were wounded, overwhelming this 100 bed regional hospital.


Wounded Libyans recover in Baida hospital.


A view looking out across eastern Libya.

All photographs by David Degner for The Wall Street Journal

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Let’s start with some World Press Photo winners’ interviews…

Interviews - Daniel Morel (BJP: February 2011)

Interviews - Jodi Bieber (Mediaclubsouthafrica: February 2011)

InterviewsAndrew McConnell (Msnbc: February 2011) Photoblog exclusive: Interview with World Press Photo winner Andrew McConnell

InterviewsMichael Wolf (BJP: February 2011) World Press Photo: Is Google Street View photojournalism?

Photographers - Michael Wolf

I took another look at the winners gallery on the Word Press Photo site, and I couldn’t feel a bit baffled that the 1st prize sports story went to photographer Adam Pretty for ‘sports portfolio’… his photos were great, but how portfolio can be seen as a story, I don’t understand…I preferred the 2nd prize winner Tomasz Gudzowaty’s Mexico Car Frenzy piece in the sense that it was a clear story and very, very strong… Had to check out his personal site…

Photo: Tomasz Gudzowaty

PhotographersTomasz Gudzowaty

Wasn’t familiar with his work before…Neither did I know of these photographer…no that they were the only ones…

Daily Life 2nd prize singles winner…

PhotographersMalte Jaeger

Daili life 2nd prize stories winner…

PhotographersFernando Moleres

It was nice to see some smiles in the World Press Photo winners gallery too..Such a great and simple idea by Amit Madheshiya…

The above is from Arts and Entertainment: 1st prize stories

Interesting fact, if true, in Scott Strazzante tweet yesterday…”All you need to know about subjectivity of contests- World Press Photo of the Year voted out in 1st round of POYi portrait judging”

Articles – BagNewsNotes: What’s Wrong with the World Press Choice of “Photo of the Year”? (BNN: February 2011)

Articles – DuckRabbit: World Press or Propaganda? (Duckrabbit: Februrary 2011)

Articles - Joerg Colberg: It is that time of the year again(Conscientious: February 2011)

Photos: Jodi Bieber (left); Steve McCurry (right)

Articles – David Campbell: Thinking Images v.10: Jodi Bieber’s Afghan girl portrait in context (David Campbell blog: February 2011)

Articles – Jeremy Nicholl: An Unfortunate Event At World Press Photo (Jeremy Nicholl blog: February 2011)

Articles - Greg Ruffing: On Technology and Photography: Damon Winter in POY, Michael Wolf in World Press (Photographer’s blog: February 2011)

POYi…

Articles - PDN: Damon Winter Wins Newspaper Photographer of the Year at POYi (PDN: February 2011)

Bill Allard on photo contests…

Articles - William Albert Allard: Awards (Photographer’s blog: February 2011)

PhotographersWilliam Albert Allard

Back to Cairo….

Photo: Alex Majoli

Features and Essays - Alex Majoli: The Agony and Ecstacy (Newsweek: February 2011) Egypt

Photo: Peter Turnley/Corbis

Features and Essays - Peter Turnley: Turning Point of Revolution in Egypt (Photographer’s website: February 2011) Same series on The Online Photographer with interesting notes by Turnley himself.

Photo: David Degner

Features and Essays - WSJ (David Degner and Guy Martin): Celebrations Follow Resignation in Egypt (WSJ: February 2011)

More photos added since Saturday to the Cairo gallery by Dominic Nahr on the TIME website…

Features and Essays – Dominic Nahr: Uprising in Cairo (TIME: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Etienne De Malglaive: Fort Liberty in Tahrir Square (Photographer’s archive: February 2011)

Articles - BJP: Dispatches from Tahrir Square – Photographers recount their experiences in Cairo and look at the future (BJP: February 2011)

Photo: Francesco Alesi

Features and Essays – Francesco Alesi: The Limbo Nation (Parallelo Zero: 2011) Nagorno Karabakh, South Caucasus

Features and Essays - Ed Kashi: The Leaves Keep Falling (VII Magazine: February 2011) Legacy of Agent Orang

Features and Essays – Richard Nicholson: London’s Last Darkrooms (Telegraph: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Evan Joseph: New York City At Night (Telegraph: February 2011)

Features and Essays – David Trilling: Turkmenistan: While Officials Frolic, Caspian Gas Mecca Rusts and Groans (Eurasianet.org: 2011)

Features and Essays - Sebastien van Malleghem: Police (burn: February 2011)

Poulomi Basu’s To Conquer Her Land now in Guernica….

Features and Essays - Poulomi Basu: To Conquer Her Land (Guernica: February 2011)

Daniel Cuthbert’s Bushmen on BBC…

Features and Essays - Daniel Cuthbert: South Africa’s Bushmen under threat (BBC: February 2011)

Eugene Richards interview Gerry Badger did with him in 2009…related to his War is Personal work and book

InterviewsEugene Richards (BJP: 2009)

Speaking of books…Congratulations again to Ben Lowy …

Photo: Ben Lowy

Articles – BJP: Benjamin Lowy wins First Photography Book Prize (BJP: February 2011)

Articles - CDS Awards: William Eggleston Selects Benjamin Lowy to Win First Book Prize in Photography (CDS: February 2011)

More books…

BooksDewiLewis : new 2011 catalogue is now available to download.

Interviews - Larry Clark (Guardian: February 2011)

InterviewsPhilip Lorca di Corcia (NYT: February 2011)

Interviews - Jon Levy (Vimeo)

Intervews - Misha Erwitt (Leica blog: 2011)

Saw Andrew Burton tweet this: “If you work, contribute or are interested in any form of media, entertainment or journalism, READ THIS:”

Articles - NYT: David Carr: At Media Companies, a Nation of Serfs (NYT: February 2011)

Articles – NYT: War Photographer Remembered at Paris Show (NYT: 2011)

Articles - A Photo Editor: Recent Facebook Changes Are Bad For Professional Photographers (APE: February 2011)

Articles - Verve Photo: Rachel Mummey (Verve: February 2011)

My friend Conor O’Leary, is probably even a bigger PJ hound than me… tweeted this the other day…

“New website and new work from Mikhael Subotzky”…better check it out then…

The above is from Subotzky’s couple of years old Beaufort West series

PhotographersMikhael Subotzky … the new work

Photographers - Will Berridge

AgenciesVII Network February 2011 newsletter

InterviewsEdward Linsmier (Tampabay.com: February 2011) St. Petersburg Times photo intern Edward Linsmier

Resources - Shakodo

TutorialsHow to shoot video for News and documentary (iTunes)

Resources - The Pocket Locator | more info

Videos / InterviewsPhotographer Alec Soth on a Life of Approaching Strangers (Youtube)

Grants - Michael P. Smith Fund For Documentary Photography

To finish off, a joke… “So this SEO expert walks into a bar, grill, pub, public house, Irish bar, bartender, drinks, beer, wine, liquor…” via @pud

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See the action in Egypt Friday through the lenses of The Wall Street Journal’s photographers.


In Alexandria, many entrepreneurs sold flags around the city. (David Degner for the Wall Street Journal)

A square in Alexandria was filled with people Friday. Alexandria, a conservative city and stronghold for the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood, provided the original spark for what eventually would escalate into Egypt’s facebook revolution. (David Degner for the Wall Street Journal)

Outrage at the death of 28-year-old Khaled Said, allegedly beaten to death in an Alexandria Internet café by two police officers in June, inspired the wildly popular Facebook page that called for Egyptians to go into the streets and call for the government to step down, 18 days ago. (David Degner for the Wall Street Journal)

Amongst the many Egyptian flags flying in Alexandria Friday, a small green one represented Islam. (David Degner for the Wall Street Journal)

The Corniche — the sweeping six-lane boulevard along Alexandria’s long seafront — was impassable within minutes of the announcement of Mr. Mubarak’s resignation, as thousands of people poured into the streets. (David Degner for the Wall Street Journal)

A woman standing through the moonroof of a car in Alexandria held up a flag. (David Degner for the Wall Street Journal)

Alexandria is home to some five million people, and, in the moments that followed Friday evening’s news that Mr. Mubarak would step down as president of Egypt, nearly all of them seemed to pour into the streets in celebration. (David Degner for the Wall Street Journal)

People celebrating in Alexandria waved signs, hung out car windows, and danced on the sea wall. (David Degner for the Wall Street Journal)

A man kneeled in a road and prayed in Alexandria. (David Degner for the Wall Street Journal)

Many families joined in the celebration in Alexandria. (David Degner for the Wall Street Journal)

People celebrating in Tahrir Square in Cairo used aerosol cans to create streaks of fire. (Guy Martin for the Wall Street Journal)

A man gazed towards a screen in Tahrir Square. (Guy Martin for the Wall Street Journal)

A man in Cairo held up a laptop displaying an image of celebrations in Egypt after hearing the news that Mr. Mubarak was resigning. (Guy Martin for the Wall Street Journal)

Two men embraced in Tahrir Square after hearing that Mr. Mubarak was resigning. (Guy Martin for the Wall Street Journal)

People lighted flares in Tahrir Square. (Guy Martin for the Wall Street Journal)

Flares illuminated the crowd in Tahrir Square. (Guy Martin for the Wall Street Journal)

A man covered his face while talking on the phone in Cairo after hearing of Mr. Mubarak’s resignation. (Guy Martin for the Wall Street Journal)

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Features and Essays – Agnes Dherbeys: Red Shirts (updated) (VII Magazine: May 2010)

Features and Essays – Stanley Greene: Cannes (NOOR: May 2010)

Features and Essays - Nina Berman: Tea Party (NOOR: May 2010)

Features and Essays - Lynsey Addario: Reaching Out to Afghan Women (NYT: May 2010)

Features and Essays - Boston Globe: Afghanistan May 2010 (Boston Globe Big Picture: May 2010)

Features and Essays – James Estrin: Faltering Hope in Haiti (NYT: May 2010)

Articles - PDN: Was Annie Leibovitz a Victim of Fraud? (PDN: May 2010)

Tutorials - David Degner: 13 Photography Portfolio Website Options (Incendiary Image: May 2010)

Features and Essays - Christopher Morris: Obama’s Burden (Telegraph21: May 2010) video

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