Skip navigation
Help

David W Cerny

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
(author unknown)

One of the oldest forms of storytelling is that of re-enactment, donning the costumes of the story's subjects, miming their actions, performing a narrative before a live audience. Whether organized by history enthusiasts, government offices, religious groups, or just for fun, military battles and religious events are the most popular subjects for re-enactment. Collected here are recent performances from around the world, covering a few events from the past 2,000 years. [36 photos]

Actors wearing military uniforms of the Hungarian and Austrian Hapsburg dynasty reenact the first stage of the 1849 Battle of Isaszeg, Hungary, on April 6, 2013 during the Isaszeg Historical Days event. The battle was part of the Spring Campaign of the Hungarian Revolution of 1848 between the Austrian Empire and the Hungarian Revolutionary Army. (Peter Kohalmi/AFP/Getty Images)     

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
(author unknown)

Heavy rainfall over Europe during the the past week has swollen many rivers past their flood stage, wreaking havoc unseen in decades across Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Hungary, Slovakia, Poland and the Czech Republic. At least 18 people across the region have been killed, and tens of thousands have been evacuated. In Germany, the crest of the Elbe River is now approaching the North Sea, as the swollen Danube River is surging toward the Hungarian capital of Budapest. Collected here are images from the past several days of those affected by these historic floods, even as meteorologists predict more rain over the coming weekend. [36 photos]

The city hall of Grimma, Germany, surrounded by floodwater, on June 3, 2013. Flooding has spread across a large area of central Europe following heavy rainfall in recent days. Eastern and southern Germany are suffering under floods that in some cases are the worst in 400 years. Tens of thousands of Germans, Hungarians and Czechs were evacuated from their homes as soldiers raced to pile up sandbags to hold back rising waters in the region. (AP Photo/dpa, Jens Wolf)     

0
Your rating: None

Today is the vernal equinox, the first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere. It also marks the end of "the winter that wasn't," as the past several months in North America have been dubbed. It was the fourth-warmest winter in the United States since record-keeping began 117 years ago. In accord with the unusual weather, this turn of the season brings us snow in Arizona and Saudi Arabia, while conditions remain sunny and warm in America's Northeast and Western Europe. Collected here are scenes from around the world as a strange winter gives way to spring. [40 photos]

The sun sets behind cherry blossoms which have come into full bloom due to the early warm weather in Washington, D.C., on March 19, 2012. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

0
Your rating: None

Frigid temperatures have gripped Europe in the last week, with the mercury reaching as low as 35 degrees Celsius below zero. After what had been a relatively mild winter, the sudden cold caught many unprepared. Eastern Europe is hardest hit, with over 100 deaths in Ukraine, and with over 11,000 people in remote villages cut off by snow in Serbia. Most of the fatalities recorded have been homeless people found frozen to death outside, and emergency tents with hot meals have been set up to help them in several affected countries. Russia and Poland are mobilizing help for the homeless. Travel in Romania has been chaos as a blizzard hampered efforts to clear both rails and roads. Recorded temperatures in Italy were the lowest in 27 years. -- Lane Turner (45 photos total)
A woman looks out a bus in Bucharest on February 2, 2012. (Vadim Ghirda/Associated Press)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

CROWNING AROUND
CROWNING AROUND: Swimmers took part in a New Year swim in the Vltava River on Friday in Prague. Prague Castle is seen in the background. (Matej Divazna/AFP/Getty Images)

DIRTY WATER
DIRTY WATER: A Pakistani boy waded through a dirty water channel on the outskirts of Peshawar, Pakistan, on Friday. An estimated 250,000 children die annually in Pakistan from water-borne diseases, local media APP reported on Wednesday. (Umar Qayyum/Xinhua/Zuma Press)

SLIPPERY SLOPE
SLIPPERY SLOPE: Britain’s Kristan Bromley competed in the men’s skeleton race during the FIBT Bobsleigh and Skeleton World Cup competition in Altenberg, Germany, on Friday. (David W Cerny/Reuters)

HAILSTONES
HAILSTONES: An Indian girl picked up hail after a hail storm and heavy rain outside the Sikh Shrine Golden temple in Amritsar on Friday. (Narinder Nanu/AFP/Getty Images)

EPIPHANY
EPIPHANY: A worshiper kissed a pillar in the Church of the Nativity, traditionally believed by Christians to be the birthplace of Jesus Christ, during Orthodox Christmas in the West Bank city of Bethlehem on Friday. (Bernat Armangue/Associated Press)

NEW BISHOPS
NEW BISHOPS: Marek Solczynski of Poland and Charles John Brown of the U.S. lay on the ground before being appointed bishops by Pope Benedict XVI during the Eucharist for the Solemnity of Epiphany on Friday at St Peter’s basilica at the Vatican. (Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images)

IN THE DRINK
IN THE DRINK: A man dragged packages of potable water in a flooded street in the Tres Vendas neighborhood in Campos, Brazil, Friday. A dike burst in the flood-hit northern Rio de Janeiro state Thursday, forcing the evacuation of their nearly 4,000 residents, authorities said. (Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images)

0
Your rating: None

IN MOURNING
IN MOURNING: Dagmar Havlova, seen through the window of a hearse, and thousands of Czechs paid their respects to her husband, Vaclav Havel, in Prague Wednesday. Mr. Havel, whose ‘Velvet Revolution’ toppled communist rule, died Sunday at age 75 after a respiratory illness. (David W Cerny/Reuters)

MANY OPTIONS
MANY OPTIONS: A vendor sat near displays of cellphone numbers of Kuwait’s Zain and South Africa’s MTN carriers in Khartoum, Sudan, Wednesday. (Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters)

SOLDIERS STRETCH
SOLDIERS STRETCH: Soldiers rehearsed Wednesday on Rajpath Boulevard in New Delhi for India’s upcoming Republic Day celebrations. (Kevin Frayer/Associated Press)

DIGGING OUT
DIGGING OUT: A boy shoveled mud from his home in Iligan, Philippines, Wednesday. Flash flooding from Typhoon Washi left hundreds of people dead and displaced hundreds of thousands. (Erik De Castro/Reuters)

HELPING HANDS
HELPING HANDS: Soldiers carried Zeinab al-Shogery, whose leg is injured, from a polling station in Giza, Egypt, Wednesday. The country is holding staggered parliamentary elections. Recent clashes between the military and pro-democracy activists have left at least 14 people dead. (Nasser Nasser/Associated Press)

VOTER OUTREACH
VOTER OUTREACH: Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov.Romney waved to voters inside a pizza parlor in Newport, N.H., Wednesday. (Jessica Rinaldi/Reuters)

0
Your rating: None

The source of an E. coli outbreak in Europe that has killed 22 people and sickened more than 2,200 is still not known. German authorities at first blamed it on cucumbers grown in Spain, causing outrage among Spanish farmers. They are claiming they lost tens of millions of dollars due to a slump in demand. Tests showed that Spanish cucumbers did not contain the dangerous strain. Bean sprouts from a farm in Germany are now being tested, though the first tests did not find the contamination. Cases have shown up in at least 10 countries and have left more than 600 in intensive care.(30 photos total)
A nurse cares for a patient infected with the virulent E. coli bacteria and undergoing dialysis treatment at an intensive care unit of Hamburg's UKE university clinic on June 1, 2011. The number of people sickened by a mysterious killer bacteria grew, two weeks after the outbreak in Germany, while fears over tainted vegetables hit European farmers hard. Scientists and health officials say they have identified the E. coli bacteria responsible for the outbreak, which has mainly affected northern Germany, but are unable to say what caused it or who was responsible. (Angelika Warmuth/AFP/Getty Images)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None