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Gaston Lacombe

Captive

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In zoos all around the world, visitors go to admire some of the most beautiful, rare or fierce creatures on Earth, but often fail to notice the deplorable habitats in which they are kept.

I have been gathering pictures from zoos all around for the last three years. I like most zoos — I really do. Some zoos need to be congratulated for making great efforts at conserving endangered species, providing shelter to animals who could not otherwise survive and educating the public on ecological issues.

However, even in the best zoos, there are animals that are stuck in cement enclosures too small for their needs, or in rooms where the only vegetation they see are the plants painted on the wall. I’ve seen animals living in cages where they cannot even sit up, or have no access to daylight or clean water. At these moments, I feel guilty for supporting a system that treats animals cruelly, and at these moments, I take pictures.

 

Bio

Gaston Lacombe is a photographer and filmmaker, originally from the Canadian province of New Brunswick.

He has left his footprints all over the globe, including living in Latvia for 12 years, and is presently based in Washington DC. He completed his Professional Photography degree at the Center for the Digital Imaging Arts at Boston University (Washington DC campus), and also has studied at the B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. level in History.

He specializes mostly in documentary projects that have taking him to all corners of the planet. This includes an art residency in Antarctica with the government of Argentina in early 2012. His work has been shown in PDN magazine, the Washington Post, the Toronto Star, and many other publications. His photos have also been exhibited in solo and group shows in North America and Europe, including at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC.

 

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Gaston Lacombe

 

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Martine Franck, an esteemed documentary and portrait photographer and second wife of Henri Cartier-Bresson, died of cancer in Paris on Aug. 16 at the age of 74. A member of Magnum Photos for more 32 years, Franck was a co-founder and president of the Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation.

“Martine was one classic Magnum photographer we could all agree with,” said photographer Elliott Erwitt. “Talented, charming, wise, modest and generous, she set a standard of class not often found in our profession. She will be profoundly missed.”

Born in Antwerp, Belgium in 1938, Franck studied art history at the University of Madrid and at the Ecole du Louvre in Paris. In 1963, she began her photographic career at Time-Life in Paris, assisting photographers Eliot Elisofan and Gjon Mili. Although somewhat reserved with her camera at first, she quickly blossomed photographing the refined world of Parisian theater and fashion. A friend, stage director Ariane Mnouchkine, helped establish Franck as the official photographer of the Théâtre du Soleil in 1964—a position she held for the next 48 years.

As her career grew, Franck pursued a wide range of photographic stories, from documentary reportage in Nepal and Tibet to gentle and evocative portraits of Paris’s creative class. Her portfolio of the cultural elite includes photographic peers Bill Brandt and Sarah Moon as well as artist Diego Giacometti and philosopher Michel Foucault, among others. In 1983, she became a full member of Magnum Photos, one of a small number of female members at the legendary photographic agency. Balancing her time between a variety of stories, her work reflects an innate sensitivity to stories of humanity.

In a piece published in the Guardian in 2006 about her time photographing a Buddhist monastery in Nepal, Franck chose to highlight a photo (slide #2 above) of an elder monk sitting with a young apprentice.

“I was there for an hour, just sitting quietly in a corner, observing,” she explained. “The picture is somehow a symbol of peace, and of young people getting on with old people. Although I didn’t think that at the time—in the moment, it’s just instinctive. Afterwards, maybe, you realize what the photograph means.”

Her humanitarian work paired her with numerous social humanitarian organizations and was heralded for the truths it revealed. But her name was also often associated with Henri Cartier-Bresson.

In an interview on Charlie Rose, Franck recalled her first time meeting her future husband in 1965.

“His opening line was ‘Martine, I want to come and see your contact sheets,’” she recalled. They married in 1970.

Throughout her career, Franck served as a powerful advocate, both for Magnum and for the continued legacy of her husband. Serving as the president and co-founder of the Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation, Franck ensured that the spirit of his work survived.

Franck continued to work on her own photography, participating in group projects with Magnum, including “Georgian Spring.” As recently as this April, Franck’s expansive collection of portraits were exhibited in Paris at the Galerie Claude Bernard.

Magnum photographer and President Alex Majoli described Franck as a dear friend and a steady foundation within the photo agency. “Magnum has lost a point of reference, a lighthouse, and one our most influential and beloved members with her death,” he said in a statement released by Magnum over the weekend.

She is survived by her daughter, Melanie.

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Photojournalism that caught my eye during the month of March….

Features and Essays

One of my big faves, Tomas Munita, had a series from Cuba for Time to coincide the Papal visit to the country… opening double spread from the latest magazine seen here… Lightbox slideshow through the link…

Tomas Munita: Church and State: The Role of Religion in Cuba (Lightbox)

Side note on the above…what made me fall in love with his work? It was his stunning 2006 Oskar Barnack winning series from Kabul. You can see most of the frames here. Man, Leica, and slide film working in perfect harmony…

Japan. 11 March saw the anniversary of the tsunami…

Nachtwey recently got four double trucks in Time for his Japan 1 Year Later portfolio.Pretty rare these days for something like that to happen I think…

James Nachtwey: Japan One Year After (Lightbox)

Daniel Berehulak: Japan One Year After (NPR)

James Whitlow Delano: Black Tsunami (Vimeo)

David Guttenfelder: Tsunami, Then and Now (SacBee Frame blog)

Alvaro Ybarra Zavala: Route 45: Japan’s Earthquake & Tsunami Anniversary (Reportage)

Espen Rasmussen: Fukushima Fallout (Panos)

Noriko Hayashi: One Year On (Panos)

Dean Chapman: Fading Memories II (Panos)

Hiroko Masuike: A Japanese Community After the Tsunami (NYT Lens) Related

Chris Steele-Perkins: Tsunami Streetwalk, Kesennuma / Streetwalk 2 (Magnum in Motion)

Syria.

Moises Saman: Refugees Flee Syrian Violence in Turkey (NYT)

Ed Ou: Syrians Find Refuge in Lebanon (NYT)

William Daniels: Escape from Syria (Lightbox)

Tyler Hicks: Glimpses of the Armed Opposition in Syria (NYT)

Rodrigo Abd: Inside Syria (Lightbox) from Guardian

Tyrone Turner: Where Slaves Ruled (Brazil) (NGM)

Recent great International Herald Tribune front page pic by Meredith Kohut and the slideshow on NYT.com…

Meredith Kohut: In Salvador, Prisons Packed to the Bars (NYT)

Pete Muller: Ethiopian Forces in Somalia (Newsweek)

Dominic Nahr: On the Ground: Safe fro Kony? (Lightbox)

Adam Dean: Daw Aung San Suu Kyi Campaigns in Myanmar (NYT)

Adam Ferguson: Christians Flee Iraq (NYT)

Ikuru Kuwajima: Astana, Kazakhstan’s Capital Outside In (NYT Lens)

Sergey Kozmin: Elite Russian Military School for Girls (NYT Lens)

Stefano de Luigi: Cinema in Iran (Lightbox)

Eugene Richards: ‘War is Personal’ Continues (Lightbox)

Jocelyn Bain Hogg: British Entertainment (VII)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind: Siberian Supermodels (VII) multimedia

Franco Pagetti: Egypt (VII)

Davide Monteleone: Libya : Winners and Losers (VII)

Stefan Bladh: Youth in Kaliningrad, Russia (Lightbox)

Politics. Russia.

Yuri Kozyrev: On the Campaign Trail with Vladimir Putin (Lightbox)

Politics. US.

This was a TIME magazine cover story early this year…

Christopher Morris: A Day With Obama (VII)

Justin Maxon: On the Trail with Santorum (Lightbox)

Charles Ommanney: Santorum (Newsweek)

Lauren Lancaster: Super Tuesday (New Yorker)

Evan Vucci: GOP Campaign Trail with Instragram (MSNBC photo blog)

Lauren Fleishman: Romney : Super Tuesday (Lightbox)

Stephen Crowley: Smoke-Filled Rooms part 2 (NYT Lens)

Jeroen Oerlemans: Dreaming of Europe (Panos)

Adam Dean: City of Broken Dreams (Panos)

Alfredo Caliz: The Longest Spring (Panos)

William Daniels: Faded Tulips (Lightbox)

Afghanistan.

Alixandra Fazzina: Over Mountains, Underground (NOOR)

Jason P Howe: Afghanistan: Saving Private Bainbridge (Telegraph)

Andrea Bruce: Skiing in Afghanistan (NYT Lens)

Larry Towell: Afghanistan (Lightbox)

Peter Hapak: Olympic Women’s Boxing Hopefuls (Lightbox)

Rian Dundon: A View From Inside The Other New China (Burn)

Spencer Platt: Haiti Landfills (MSNBC photo blog)

Sally Ryan: Home No More (zReportage)

Kate Holt: Education for All (zReportage)

John Pendygraft: If I Die Young (zReportage)

Peggy Peattie: Angels of Milot (zReportage)

Fredrik Naumann: A Voice from Rost (Foto8)

Rob Hornstra: Empty Land, Promised Land, Forbidden Land (Foto8)

Dominic Nahr: Voices of Protest in Senegal (Magnum Photos)

Mila Teshaieva: Promising Waters (Lightbox)

Kevin Frayer: Holi Festivities (SecBee)

Chris Kelly: Situation in Southern Kordofan (Photographer’s archive)

Tomas Wiech: Poland’s Great Adventure (NYT Lens)

Brent Lewin: India’s ‘rat hole’ Mines (National Post)

Pete Pin: Cambodian Americans (NYT Lens)

Martin Parr: Think of Finland (Magnum)

Alejandro Cartagena: Car Poolers (Photographer’s website)

Erica McDonald: Change in Park Slope (NYT Lens)

Ben Lowy: Ohio’s Long Road to Recovery (Reportage by Getty Tumblr)

Graeme Robertson: Portraits of Malawi (Guardian)

Carl de Souza: The Maasai Cricket Warriors (Atlantic) Kenya

Enjoyed these sports pics…

Fred R. Conrad: Spring Training (NYT Lens)

NYT Lens (various photographers): Postcard from London

Kate Peters: Yes, Mistress (Institute)

Jonathan Torgovnik: Rebuilding the DRC (BBC)

Tom Stoddart: Women of Sarajevo Revisited (Reportage)

Bruce Gilden shooting fashion for Vice…

Bruce Gilden: In Broad Daylight (Vice)

Daniel Cuthbert: First on Scene : South African Paramedics (BBC)

Alex Troesch and Aline Paley: Mexican Pointy Boots (Lightbox)

Danko Stjepanovic: North Kosovo (photographer’s website)

Interviews and Talks

“I looked through a lens and ended up abandoning everything else’ – Sebastiao Salgado

Sebastiao Salgado (Guardian)

Sebastiao Salgado (Vimeo)

Excellent 9 minute video by Finnish photographer Rami Hanafi on Martin Parr working in Finland…

Martin Parr : Making of ‘Think of Finland’ (Vimeo)

Zohra Bensemra: My journey into Syria’s nightmare (Reuters)

Ed Kashi (NYT Lens)

Samuel Bollendorff (BJP)

Elliott Erwitt on the art of photographic sequencing (BBC)

Lynsey Addario (Newsweek)

Lynsey Addario (Newsweek)

Davide Monteleone (Develop Tube)

Sean Gallagher (Atlantic)

Alex Prager : this year’s Foam Paul Huf Award winner (BJP)

Sebastian Salgado : The Photographer as an activist (Youtube)

Giles Peress (Youtube)

Pieter Hugo (Vimeo)

Barbara Davidson (LA Times Framework blog)

Homer Sykes (Photoshelter blog)

Olivia Arthur (IdeasTap)

Naomi Harris (Thisisthewhat)

Dominic Bracco II : Turning Point (NYT Lens)

Fiona Rogers (IdeasTap)

Giles Duley : Becoming the Story (TED on Youtube)

Justyna Mielnikiewicz (TED Youtube on Reportage)

Steve Pyke (PicBod)

Mark Power (Impressions Gallery)

John Moore on on ‘Epic’ Libya Battles, Arab World Revolutions (Click)

Shaun Fenn : From Assistant to Photographer: Shaun Fenn’s Professional Transition (PDN)

Articles

Tyler Hicks on his assignment to Syria with late Anthony Shadid…

Tyler Hicks: Bearing Witness in Syria: A Correspondent’s Last Days (NYT)

Javier Espinosa: How I escaped from Homs as Syrian forces closed in (Guardian)

PDN: Remembering 13 Unsung Heroes of Photojournalism

PDN: Paula Lerner Obituary

NYT: Stan Stearns, Photographer of John F. Kennedy Jr.’s Salute to Father, Dies at 76

NYT: Lillian Bassman, Fashion and Fine-Art Photographer, Dies at 94

Lynsey Addario was featured on Guardian’s brilliant ‘Best Shot’ series…

Guardian: Photographer Lynsey Addario’s Best Shot

Guardian: Photographer Tom Craig’s best shot

Related… Guardian: My best shot: The one that got away | For five years, G2 has been asking photographers to tell us the story behind their best shot. But what about their worst? Jane Bown, Martin Parr, Terry O’Neill and others reveal all

And… Guardian: My Worst Shot

Guardian: The Month in Photography

Guardian: Photographs Not Taken: what makes a photographer freeze? | A new book of essays by photographers explores the missed opportunities of images never captured

NYT Lens: Empowerment, Through a Lens

David Campbell: Kony2012, symbolic action and the potential for change

NYT: David LaChapelle, From Photographer to Artist

Verve: Kirsten Luce

Verve: Jeremy Nichol

Verve: Alessandro Grassani

Verve: Jonathan Lewis

Verve: Max Sher

Boston Globe on VII Photo’s Hipstamatic shot exhibition…

photo: John Stanmeyer

Boston Globe: With Hipstamatic app, photojournalists smartphone it in to new exhibit

Nick Stern: Why Instagram photos cheat the viewer (CNN)

PDN: Eggleston’s First-Ever Large Pigment Prints Earn 5.9 Million at Auction

D Perez: Chimping (Vimeo)

FT: What Eve Arnold Saw

Guardian: All About Eve

NYT Lens: Steichen, A New Trove From an Old Master

Diane Smyth: Dana Popa (PhotoMonitor)

BBC: England Uncensored by Peter Dench

Lightbox: DEVELOP Tube: A photographic resource grows

BJP: William Klein will receive the Outstanding Contribution to Photography Award at the Sony World Photogrpahy Awards

BJP: World Photo London is starting next month, packed with talks, seminars and workshops

Eggleston Shore (video on 1000Words blog)

Conscientious: How to make a photobook | related

Gregory Crewdson movie : trailer

PhotoShelter: Should Photo Contests Require Original Image Files?

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

Elles van Gelderen and Ilvy Njiokiktjien won first prize in World Press Photo Multimedia contest for “Afrikaner Blood….Not surprised. I remember telling friends after Perpignan that one of the best things I had seen during the festival was that exact multimedia piece….

photo Ilvy Njiokiktjien

BJP: World Press Photo announces Multimedia contest winners | Related: Bombay FC: WPP Multimedia Judging part 2 . Part 1

Foto8 Summershow 2012

FotoVisura winners…

Photo: Erin Trieb

FotoVisura Photography Grant Winners

BJP: Anastasia Taylor-Lind has won the Center Project Award in Santa Fe

BJP: Paul Graham wins the Hasselblad Foundation International Award for Photography, worth $150,000

Days Japan Photojournalism Awards 2012

Slideluck Potshow is coming to London again….

Slideluck Potshow London IV Submissions | related on Wayne Ford’s blog

NPPA: Justin Maxon, Katie Orlinsky Win 2011 Alexia Foundation Grants

Finland’s press photos of the year…

Sami Kero got the POY with a photo from Cairo…

photo: Sami Kero / Helsingin Sanomat

Finland Press Photos of the Year 2011

London Festival of Photography 2012 Prize

The City of Levallois Photography Award

Eddie Adams Workshop now accepting submissions

LUCEO Student Project Award

KL Photo Awards 2012

Guardian Student Media Awards 2012

Agencies and Collectives

Magnum open to submissions again. Last year they didn’t take any new nominees, if I remember correctly…

photo: Burt Glinn

Apply to become a member of Magnum Photos : 2012 Submissions are now open : Deadline is 08/06/12

photo: Venetia Dearden

VII Photo Newsletter March 2012

Noor newsletter 15 March 2012

Prime Collective March 2012 newsletter

Reportage by Getty Images: Natalie Naccache now part of Emerging Talent

Read about this commercial agency on Twitter… Good line-up of photographers.. including Tom Stoddart..

Making Pictures : commercial photo agency : London

Books

VII Photo’s Questions Without Answers book featured on Phaidon blog…

Photo: Alexandra Boulat

Phaidon: The defining images of our turbulent times…VII: Questions Without Answers

Jörg Colberg: Better by Design: The role of design in the making of five modern photobooks (BJP)

multiMedia

Once Magazine

Blogs

Happy belated birthday to Lightbox!

photo: Joakim Eskildsen

Lightbox: A Year of Great Photography

Photo Archive News

Crowd Funding and related

photo: Andre Liohn

Almost Dawn in Libya aka ADIL (NYT Lens)

Paula Lerner Memorial Fund

Photo Time Machine on Kickstarter

Respecting My Elders on USAProjects

Jobs

Save The Children : 3 month internship opening in the Film&Photo team

Photographers

Thomas Lekfeldt

Tahnia Roberts

Max Strong

Max Fabrizi

To finish off… KillShot: A Rifle Camera for Hunting with Photos Instead of Bullets

And… Britain’s top 10 worst photographers

And… Photographic Moratorium – Looking Sad in the Tub

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Features and Essays 

Coming up in National Geographic Magazine’s November issue…

Chuffed to see that Erika Larsen’s Sami series has made it to NatGeo..Looking forward to seeing it in print….

Erika Larsen: Sami Reindeer Herders (NGM)

Pascal Maitre,Joel Sartore, and Carsten Peter: Rift in Paradise—Africa’s Albertine Rift (NGM)

I’m sure you’ll remember this too..

Timothy Archibald: Echolilia (NGM)

Two series by Stephanie Sinclair…This one is terrific…

Stephanie Sinclair: Hillary’s Angels (VII)  Women working as secretary of state’s security detail

Stephanie Sinclair: Phiona Mutesi, a Ugandan chess prodigy (VII Magazine)

Libya…

New Magnum in Motion piece by Moises Saman on Libya’s last days Gaddafi’s rule…

Moises Saman: Theater of War (Magnum in Motion)

Another Magnum photographer’s, Alex Majoli’s series in Newsweek….

Alex Majoli: Libyans in a Strange Land (Newsweek)

Mauricio Lima for the New York Times:

Mauricio Lima: In Surt, Chronicle of a Death Foretold (NYT Lens) Libya

Elsewhere in Middle East…

Alfredo D’Amato: Early Days of Spring (Panos) Tunisia

Portraits of Occupy Wall Street protestors in Zuccotti Park by Martin Schoeller in New Yorker and Sasha Bezzubov in TIME …

Bezzubov’s series on Lightbox opens with a crowd shot that was printed double spread in the magazine… See below how that and the portraits were used in print…

Sasha Bezzubov: Taking It to the Streets (Lightbox)

I haven’t seen how Schoeller’s portraits were used in print…

Martin Schoeller: Portraits From Occupy Wall Street (New Yorker)

To other things…

Global warming and rising sea level…

Amelia Holowaty Krales: Tuvalu, an Island in Danger (NYT Lens) Amelia Holowaty Krales’s website

Jocelyn Carlin: Global Warming’s Front Line (Panos)

Robin Hammond: Tuvalu Sunset (Panos)

James Whitlow Delano: The True Price, With a Hidden Cost (NYT Lens)

Tomas van Houtryve: Borderline: Bordeline: In the Shadow of North Korea (Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund)

Three Lynsey Addario series..This first one’s from the States…and her road trip with Joe Klein…

Lynsey Addario: Return to the American Road (Lightbox)

Lynsey Addario: Abandoning a Controversial Tradition (NYT) Genital cutting, Senegal

Lynsey Addario: Iraq Investors (VII)

Donald Weber: Quniqjuk, Qunbuq, Quabaa (VII)

John Vink: Cambodia 2011 Floods (Magnum)

New work from some of the Cesuralab photographers…

Luca Santese, Gabriele Micalizzi: Roma Violenta (Cesuralab)

Andy Rocchelli: Anzhi Makhachkala (Cesuralab) Makhachkala is the capital of Daghestan

Chien-Chi Chang: Burma: Land of Shadows (Magnum)

Sebastien Liste: Urban Quilombo (burn)

Kyoko Hamada: Letter to Fukushima (New Yorker)

Carolyn Drake: Among the Animals in Turkey (New Yorker)

Doug Richard: American Suburb (project website)

Boogie: The View From Kingston, Jamaica (AnnalsofAmericus)

Lizzie Sadin: Young and Imprisoned (NYT Lens) Sadin’s website

Ashley Gilbertson: MREs (Slate) includes a short interview with Gilbertson

Ryan Pfluger: Milwaukee’s Alliance School, the only gay-friendly charter school in the U.S. (Lightbox)

Richard Misrach: The Oakland-Berkeley Fire Photos  (Lightbox)

Sophie Gerrard: Protectors of Sight (BBC)

Samuel Hauenstein Swan: Somalis seek refuge in Ethiopian camps (Guardian)

Samuel: Hauenstein Swan: Tackling life-threatening child malnutrition in Chad (Guardian)

Elliott Erwitt:  Sequentially Yours (Lightbox)

Brent Stirton: The Malapa Fossils (Reportage)

Peter Dench: Dench’s England (NYT Lens)

Jules Allen: The Sweet Science of Body and Soul (NYT Lens) Allen’s website

Spike Johnson: Dale Farm Eviction (Foto8) Johnson’s archive

Kieran Doherty: Royal Wootton Bassett repatriations (Guardian)

Articles

Pretty gruesome images today in the videos showing Gaddafi captured and eventually killed…New Yorker’s Jon Lee Anderson comments…

C.I.A. agent Felix Rodriguez, left, with Che Guevara, center, before Guevara was executed in Bolivia, in 1967. Photograph: AP Photo/Courtesy of Felix Rodriguez.

Jon Lee Anderson: Picturing the Dead (New Yorker)

The day that marked Colonel Gaddafi’s death, marked also 6 months from the death of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros…Mike Kamber wrote about his friend Hetherington in New York Times Lens blog…

photo: Tim Hetherington

Mike Kamber: A Show of Respect for a Fallen Friend Tim Hetherington (NYT Lens)

C.J. Chivers: On the Day Qaddafi Dies, News – And Art – from Tim. (Journalist’s website)

Hadn’t seen this Hetherington video before…

Tim Hetherington: His Life and His Work (Vimeo)

BJP: Magnum Photos addresses Libyan Secret Service photo archive controversy | David Campbell’s comment

Source magazine: Collecting Photographs, Copyrights and Cash

An invitation to all monochrome photographers (BJP) “Emerging black-and-white photographers are invited to submit their work to Mono, a hardback photobook which will also include Roger Ballen, Anders Peterson and Oliver Pin Fat.”

Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin: Photojournalism and the war of images (Guardian)

Silly…Guardian writes about Chloe Dewe Mathews’ BJP award winning Caspia work and then crops all four of her photos shown…The photos are originally 6×7…I wonder if they’d ever do the same to a painter?

Guardian: Lives bathed in oil: how Chloe Dewe Mathews captured the Caspian coast (Guardian) “In her award-winning Caspian series, the young British photographer explores the healthy and unhealthy relationship between oil and people in a spa town in Azerbaijan”

AP Photographer Ed Reinke Dies After Assignment Injury (PDN)

NYT: Barry Feinstein, Dies at 80

PDN: Barry Feinstein, who took classic shots of Dylan, Joplin, Steve McQueen, Geo Harrison, has died at 80

PDN: Custom Tools of the Trade

LA Times: Movie review: ‘Hell and Back Again’ | Guardian review

NPPA Visual Student: Insights and Experiences from the 2011 Eddie Adams Workshop

BJP’s news editors Olivier Laurent takes a look back at this year’s Visa…

BJP: The Optimists – A look back at this year’s Visa Pour l’Image festival

Photoshelter: Your Year-end Photography Business Plan

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Paul Bronstein

Guardian: Photographer Shahidul Alam’s best shot

Ai Weiwei’s Photo Shoot from China (NYT)

Brooks Kraft’s frames on Lightbox prove you don’t need to use a filter app to make a good iPhone photo…Refreshing…

Brooks Kraft: iPhone4 S frames (Lightbox)

Verve: Tessa Bunney

Verve: Rony Zakaria

multiMedia

 Once Magazine for iPad : issue 1 available on iTunes Store

Blogs

The Map is Not the Territory : Vanessa Winship and George Georgiou are exploring America

Awards, Grants, Funds, and Competitions

The Chris Hondros Fund has launched (BJP)

The Chris Hondros Fund website

Krisanne Johnson Awarded the W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography (Time Lightbox)

W. Eugene Smith Grant Awarded to Krisanne Johnson (NYT Lens)

Hondros, Hetherington Prizes Awarded at Eddie Adams Workshop (PDN)

Spanish photographer Daniel Beltrá has won this year’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year award (BJP)

BJP: Three £3000 commissions up for grabs from Side Gallery

Interviews

photo in tear sheet: Shawn Baldwin

Errol Morris on Photography: Believing Is Seeing (Lightbox)

Henry Rollins (Featureshoot) “interview with Henry Rollins about his new photo book, ‘Occupants’”

Spencer Murphy (SIP)

Don McCullin (BBC Radio)

Old Nachtwey interview from 2002…

James Nachtwey (Apple Canada: 2002)

Yaakov Israel : CPC 2011 Winner (Conscientious)

Exhibitions and Events

Bryan Denton’s Libya exhibition opened on the same day as Gaddafi got killed… Fitting…

Revolution Photographs from Libya 2011 by Bryan Denton : October 20, 2011 – November 19, 2011 : Gulf + Western Gallery  721 Broadway, at Waverly – Ground Floor New York, NY 10003

Tim Hetherington – Visions  : October 22, 2011 till December 02, 2011 United States New York Venue details Bronx Documentary Center 614 Courtlandt Ave (at 151st) Bronx, New York 10451 United States www.bronxdoc.org info@bronxdoc.org

Need help pricing and editioning your work?

The Social  : Print Sales: Editioning, pricing, printing, and more : Monday 24 October

Foto8 : Making it Happen Seminar : 26 November 2011 : London

Agencies

VII Newsletter October 2011

photo: Paolo Woods

Institute for Artist Management adds three photographers (BJP)

Books

Magnum Photographers: Women Changing India

Equipment

Canon 1D X (CPN)

Klynt : “the interactive editing & publishing application dedicated to creative storytellers.”

Photographers

Art Streiber

Tiffany L. Clark

Daniel Sullivan

Samuel Hauenstein Swan

Richard Flint

To finish off…. iPhone 4S / Canon 5d MKII Side by Side Comparison

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During his 38 years of snapping elegant, action-packed baseball pictures, Charles Conlon was the singular figure who captured the early years of modern baseball; from 1904 to 1942, he was the sport’s de facto official photographer. And with the recent release of The Big Show: Charles M. Conlon’s Golden Age Baseball Photographs, some freshly discovered shots are being added to the Conlon canon. The compendium, published by Abrams Books in September, is a fitting follow up to Baseball’s Golden Age, Conlon’s 1993 book of the photographer’s images, which was also being re-released last month.

Conlon wasn’t raised with a camera in his hand. At the turn of the century, he was a newspaper proofreader, toiling for the New York Evening Telegram. That paper’s sports editor, John Foster, was also the assistant editor of the annual Spalding Baseball Guide. This book was not only a promotional publication for the sporting goods company, but, in the words of famed New Yorker baseball writer Roger Angell, “indispensable to any true fan.” As Angell writes in the foreward to Baseball’s Golden Age, “these pocket-size baseball compendiums contained the most up-to-date rules of the game, complete statistics and detailed summaries of the previous season, scheduling for the upcoming season, essays, editorials, and hundreds of photographs.”

Foster knew Conlon had a hobby: photography. So he asked Conlon if he’d put it to use, in his spare time, for the Guide. Over the next four decades, Conlon took some of the most iconic shots in baseball history. An unforgettable close-up of Babe Ruth, a young DiMaggio taking a swing, and Ty Cobb sliding into third base — his teeth-clenched, dirt flying in the air — are among his greatest hits.

It’s memorable images like these that appear in The Big Show, which features a surprising shot of Ruth in a Brooklyn Dodgers uniform – he was a coach for the team in 1938. Elsewhere, the 1917 Philadelphia Athletics are seen taking military instruction—the American League president wanted to show that his teams were taking part in the war effort, and portraits of Hall of Famers DiMaggio, Christy Mathewson, Connie Mack, Phil Rizzuto, Walter Johnson, Tris Speaker and Lou Gehrig are also included in this collection.

While Conlon loved the ballpark, his gig was risky. “Aside from countless narrow escapes, I was seriously injured twice,” he says in the ’93 book. “On one occasion, less than half an hour after I had assisted in caring for a brother photographer who was hit in the head by a batted ball, a vicious line drive down the first base line caught me just above the ankle, and I was unable to walk for a couple of weeks.” A second baseman for the New York Giants, Larry Doyle, had a habit of tossing his bat, which sent the shutterbugs ducking. “[Giants manager John] McGraw saw me get a close shave on day from a Doyle bat,” Conlon said, “and ordered Larry to tie the stick to his wrist with a thong.”

Sean Gregory is a staff writer at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @seanmgregory.

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The night before the tenth anniversary of September 11, I flew out to San Antonio to begin a three-week road trip across America with TIME columnist Joe Klein, from Laredo, Texas up to Des Moines, Iowa.

In the seat next to me, a beautiful woman sat caring for her quadriplegic son, who was sitting in the adjacent row with her daughter. Susan Bradley and her daughter were tender and attentive with Matt in a way that made me think his injuries were new. I, shooting my first assignment in the U.S. after 11 years of covering conflict in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Congo, Darfur, Lebanon, Somalia and Libya, assumed he was injured at war. Matt was 24, the age of so many young, American men I have spent years with on military embeds in Afghanistan, documenting the war unfolding over the years and witnessing heavy combat and brutal injuries.

As it turns out, Matt had nothing to do with Afghanistan. Like almost everyone Joe and I would meet on the road trip, the war rested on the periphery of their lives, and their primary concerns were here at home. Matt, a football player in college, and the son of a professional football player, had been rafting in Sacramento, California, when he stepped in to rescue a woman being abused by her boyfriend. As Matt walked away, the man allegedly followed him with a mag-light, and beat him on the back of the neck with the heavy flashlight, causing spinal cord injuries that left him paralyzed.

I don’t know why that moment stuck with me. I just immediately connect everything to the wars I have been covering overseas, and that’s not the case back home. I wrongly assumed all Americans at home were as consumed with our troops in Afghanistan as I was abroad.

Over the last decade, I have come to know details about most Afghan warlords, the infinite humanitarian crises across Africa, statistics of maternal mortality rates of women around the world, but I’ve become a stranger in my own country, unfamiliar with the pertinent issues at home and with what Americans are thinking the year before another presidential election. I generally don’t follow domestic news that much aside from how it relates to the stories I’m covering abroad, like what Americans think of the War in Afghanistan.

In three weeks of extensive interviews and casual conversations, I don’t remember a single person, except for veteran Anthony Smith, who was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade in Iraq, bringing up the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, without being prompted by a pointed question. Almost everyone spoke about the economy, healthcare and unemployment. People are polarized. Some are angry, and many say they are disillusioned with President Obama.

Working with Joe was quite an honor—for me, it was like a free education of politics in America. I sat in a lot of his interviews and asked him a lot of questions. Of course, I felt incredibly ignorant, because so often they were questions I should known the answers to—about politics in the States, who was running, what their platforms were. But I honestly hadn’t been following them that closely because I’ve been gone.

In fact, I’ve been gone so long that it took a while to familiarize myself with what the scenes were of the story in each city, and what the reoccurring topics of discussion were. Once I did that, I felt like I needed more time to go back and actually shoot because we moved so quickly. The pace of traveling to one city a day made it difficult for me to figure out what there was to shoot. It’s not like there was a specific protest or news event going on. It was just the city, or a gas station, or a diner, so I had to really talk to people and find out where I need to be as a photographer.

Overall though, it was really nice to be home. It was nice to be in my own country, where I didn’t need a translator or a driver. Where I didn’t need to figure out cultural references or what hijab I needed to wear to cover my hair. Americans are really lovely people—friendly, kind and willing to help you out. For me, it was incredibly humbling to come back and spend three weeks just talking to Americans all across the country and listening to what they had to stay.

Lynsey Addario is a regular contributor to TIME. See more of her work here

Read Joe Klein’s cover story from the Oct. 24, 2011 issue of TIME [available to subscribers] here.

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In his new book, the filmmaker investigates the mysteries behind some of photography’s most famous news images. Here, Morris walks TIME through five of his fascinating case studies:

TIME: In your first case study, the Crimean cannonball photos (slides 9 and 10), you write about how we can often make certain assumptions about a photographer’s intent that can misdirect us from the truth. How did that play out in these two pictures?

First off I want to say that I don’t think photographs are true or false. I always associate truth and falsity with language, rather than images, photographic and otherwise. People become endlessly confused because they think that some photographs are more true or less true than others, and they get trapped in a strange set of arguments that I believe lead nowhere. If one photograph is more true than another, then you ask yourself, are there things I can do to guarantee the truth of a photograph or to make it more truthful.

Your question was about the intent of a photographer. One of the things that people are most concerned about is the intention to deceive, to trick us, to lead us astray. Well, this pair of photographs, taken in 1855 by Roger Fention, is one of the very first war photographs. A barren landscape bisected by a road littered with cannonballs. The photographs are identical except that in one there are cannonballs on the road and in the other, there are not.

And it leads people to speculate, without even knowing they were speculating, about the order of the photographs, why there are cannonballs on the road in one and not in the other. And I used this as a way to examine our attitudes towards photographs, how we often read things into them things which weren’t there in the first place.

And at one point I even suggest that by thinking about this pair of photographs, we are really examining the nature of photography in general. So I ask a reader to go on an excursion with me. I like to think of them as little mysteries. To try to look at photographs, to try to think about what our assumptions are about them and to accompany me on an investigation into what we’re really looking at.

TIME: In writing about documentary photographs, you say that, in essence, every shot is posed because the photographer always chooses what and what not to include in the frame. I don’t think the average viewer—whether they are seeing a picture in a newspaper or a magazine or a museum exhibition—ever thinks about the fact that each photograph involved a decision of what not to include as much as it did what do include.

Photography is in part how I make my living, and I think about photography and photographs all the time. When you’re creating an image—and most of the images I create are in truth aren’t still images but motion picture images—but when you create an image, I often think about what I’m not including as well as what I am including. Images in part derive their power from the fact that we are excluding so much of the world. They’re focusing our attention in a way they it might not be focused otherwise. I can’t remember my exact wording, but somewhere in the book I talk about how photographs are ripped from the fabric of reality. I like the idea that they are torn out of reality. And we look at them and we don’t see above or below or to the left or to the right, we just see what’s inside the frame. And that’s easy to forget about.

TIME: Something that was apparent to me in your next case study was that sometimes the people who should be skeptical about photographs aren’t. I’m talking about the hooded man photo. The New York Times ran a story that identified a man as the person in that famous photo (slide 8), but it wasn’t him.

It’s probably the iconic photograph of the Iraq war. Photographs become iconic because they resonate with people for all kinds of reasons. And that photograph has been seen by hundreds of millions of people. A number of people said to me, “Well why do you care who’s under the hood? Does it really make any difference? After all, the photograph is not about who’s under the hood, it’s about torture, or it’s about these crimes committed at Abu Ghraib in 2003. Why do you care about the specific details of who it was?” And I would say that I care about both. I care about how photographs are received and viewed by people, but I also really care about their connection to the underlying world. It’s part of the mystery for me. What is it that I’m looking at? Yes, there are well-received beliefs about this photograph, but what really are we looking at? And usually you can’t determine that from just looking at the photograph itself. Usually you have to investigate. Usually you have to look further. And part of what interested me about the Abu Ghraib photographs is that a lot of people were aware of them in this country and abroad, people had views about them, and they made people very very angry for many different reasons, but no one had seemingly bothered to actually try to contextualize them, to try to investigate what it was that we were looking at, as if it was obvious.

And I have an expression that I’m fond of, which is that nothing is so obvious that it’s obvious. It’s usually when we think things are obvious that it’s time to actually look further and to try to look at our underlying assumptions. And by the way, you can investigate and you can come up short. You’re not guaranteed to solve every mystery that you set out to solve. We tried so very very hard to find the guy, the real guy, and came up short.

TIME: With the Sabrina Harmon photos (slides 6 and 7), we first saw them and saw her smiling over this dead body and that smile implied guilt even though it turns out she didn’t do anything—she didn’t abuse the prisoner, she didn’t kill him and she’s not genuinely smiling. But we automatically think that this woman helped beat this guy up and kill him.

We have problems with ambiguity and unresolved mysteries. We also have problems with complexity. Often there’s a need to see people as heroes or as villains rather than in some gray area in between. It’s easier to navigate through life that way. I was criticized for defending Sabrina Harmon. After all, what these bad apples did was terrible. A disgrace. And I am seemingly an apologist for what they did at Abu Ghraib. And I would beg to differ. Take this photograph of Sabrina Harmon and the corpse of Al Jamadi—I was trying to contextualize that image, to put it back into history, and I learned some very surprising things.

In the case of Sabrina. She took a whole range of photographs of that corpse, many of which were to document what she thought was a crime. This man had been beaten to death, presumably by a CIA operative. She had not been involved in any way. She had merely recorded the aftermath of this crime. And she, as indicated in her letters to her girlfriend she felt there was a cover-up going on and that she was going to expose it.

So we look at the photograph and think we’re seeing perhaps a murderer gloating over their crime. And, in fact, what we’re see is something very different.

TIME: At one point, you write the following: “While the technology may have changed, the underlying issues remain constant: When does a photograph document reality? When is it propaganda? When is it art? Can a single photograph be all three? That’s you writing about the Rothstein cow skull photo (slides 1-3). What’s the story there?

The Roosevelt administration had created the FSA, the Farm Security Administration, and they in turn hired photographers who were to become the most famous in history—Walker Evans, Arthur Rothstein, Dorothea Lange. These are among the great American photographers of Depression-era America. And they took literally thousands of photographs under the auspices of the government. And Rothstein was sent to the Dakotas to document the drought. And he took a photograph of a cow skull in what looked like to be a close to desert landscape. And this photograph was published in newspapers around the country as an example of how bad the drought had become in the Dakotas.

Well Rothstein did something—you could call it a mistake—he did something that created almost instant controversy when they found out about it. He had moved the cow skull to five or six different locations and photographed it. Now when people became aware there was more than one cow skull photograph and that he had moved them, for artistic purposes is what he argued, he was trying to get a really good shot with the right shadows of the cow skull. Then people say, “Well why that picture and not this one, and what were you doing, were you moving the cow skull? Were you manipulating the photograph to trick people?”

Well here’s the central irony. Here’s one of the ironies. You look at the photographs and you think, ooh, there was a drought. And guess what? There was a drought! Did the fact that he moved the cow skull suddenly invalidate that photograph? Well, you have to know something about the circumstances under which it was taken. And I did try to investigate that issue.

TIME: Finally, let’s talk about these Mickey Mouse in Palestine photos. You have a wire photographer, you have this picture of Mickey outside a bombed out apartment complex in Lebanon (slides 11 and 12). There are questions of agenda, of whether the photographer moved the mouse there, of whether the selection alone implied a bias.

These toy photographs, there was a whole collection of them that came out of Lebanon. And the claim was that pro-Palestinian, pro-Hamas photographers are, the way I imagined it, was that they were appearing in the war zone with a big bag of toys and distributing them and taking pictures of them with the intention of misleading people. One way to look at it is that Israelis are killing Palestinian children.

One of the well-known photographs of a toy taken in Lebanon, in southern Lebanon was taken by this Associated Press photographer Ben Curtis. Another irony. That we think we know how that photograph is going to be used, but it was used in just the opposite way in a newspaper than I would have thought, in an anti-Palestinian op-ed. It shows how photographs can, the meaning of them, or what we take to be the meaning of them, can be so easily changed by the context that we place around them, the new story we place around them—the caption that we put under them can change everything.

Believing is Seeing was published by Penguin Press

Gilbert Cruz is a senior editor at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @gilbertcruz. You can also continue the discussion on TIME’s Facebook page and on Twitter at @TIME.

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Elliott Erwitt generally likes to let his pictures do the talking. “I’m very bad about talking about things,” he tells me with a smile, during a recent sit-down to look through his latest book, Sequentially Yours, published this month by teNeues.

The book playfully presents a series of unscripted vignettes that bear the personal hallmark and humor of his classic images and movies, but with an original twist— rather than single shots, the photos are shown as sequences. The result is somewhere between single exposures and films, and the stories play out like silent movies—touching, funny, sad, irreverent and full of surprise.

Erwitt uses his film sparingly; he’s the first to acknowledge that he does not take as many frames as most photographers when he shoots. “The process is sometimes more interesting than the finished picture,” he says. And it’s that thought that served as the impetus for Sequentially Yours. Looking through his archive, Erwitt decided it made more sense to show sequenced images— as opposed to a single shot a la Henri Cartier-Bresson’s “Decisive Moment.”

“You always look for the best picture, but sometimes the pictures are not that great alone. But in a group, they become interesting,” Erwitt says, citing the series of people trying to close an umbrella on a windy day. “None of these are a picture on their own, but as a sequence of 32, it’s hilarious—not being able to close the umbrella and going home with it open.”

The book’s layout mimics Erwitt’s photographs in style—classic and effortless—and each of the vignettes has different constructs and different outcomes—often open to interpretation—that surprise and entertain. There are iconic images of Erwitt’s that you would expect to be the final statement in a particular sequence that actually appear in the middle of a story, proving that the iconic image can come at different points in the process and that Erwitt continues to shoot with a natural curiosity beyond the point where other photographers might stop after they’ve gotten the picture.

In a photo series of an old man and his dog, Erwitt says “the picture is of course the man talking to the dog—having had his discussion, he goes on his way.” In another series, which takes place at a graveyard, he says, “You really don’t know what is going to happen—it starts with a woman going to a cemetery to deposit some flowers and a dog follows her.” The last picture shows the dog rolling on the ground—and could stand on its own as the picture—but it is made more interesting by those that precede it. But even as the punch line, this image is still open ended. Is the dog playing dead or simply being playful?

These sequences reveal how Erwitt shoots, and he clearly has a relaxed approach and patience. “It’s like fishing. Sometimes you catch one. You lay in wait for something to happen— sometimes it happens, sometimes it doesn’t,” the photographer says of his process.

Along with the stories, there are Erwitt’s iconic photographs of public figures. The familiar images give further context by the frames which were taken immediately before or after. A group portrait taken on the set of the The Misfits movie reveals the chemistry of the cast in the build up to the final image. Richard Nixon and Nikita Khrushchev are shown as a dyptich, and a series of Che Guevara portraits are simply four pictures taken from a single photo shoot. In a Muhammad Ali vs. Joe Frazier fight sequence, the subtlety is almost lost in the magnitude of the moment. Erwitt’s explanation of this unique series is almost as surprising as Ali being knocked to the canvas. While the accredited photographers shot handheld directly at ringside, Erwitt shot from the audience a distance away, with the camera on a tripod, so you can see that all three pictures are taken from the identical position.

And while most of the image sets are taken in a concentrated time frame, there are a couple of notable exceptions. Two photos of Erwitt’s first daughter—one in which she is pregnant and the other three months later with her baby—and a series which ends the book, showing Erwitt’s personal agenda covers adorned with photographs of his two daughters taken over a thirty year period.

Erwitt has published nearly 40 books, but Sequentially Yours provides a perfect, original and refreshing context for his intuitive and instinctive images. His playful humor and wit are as sharp as ever. Here, Erwitt gives you a sense of what happens next, the end point being sometimes comic, sometimes poignant and often with a wink.

Sequentially Yours was published this month by teNeues. Erwitt will participate in a book signing at the International Center of Photography in New York on Nov. 4.

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Features and Essays

Last week saw the tenth anniversary of the war in Afghanistan..

Most of you have probably already seen this…nevertheless….LightBox put up a gallery of 43 images by war photographers in Afghanistan and the images that moved them most….Lot of familiar frames by Anderson, Morris, Sinclair, Bronstein, Haviv, Murphy, van Agtmael, Nachtwey, etc…. you name it…Hadn’t seen this one by Emilio Morenatti before…

Photo: Emilio Morenatti/AP. Afghanistan. October 4, 2004.

TIME Lightbox: Afghanistan: The Photographs That Moved Them Most (LightBox) Includes Michael Kamber  commenting on a  Tim Hetherington photo and Pancho Bernasconi commenting on a Chris Hondros photo

Just noticed Patrick Witty tweet that this week’s TIME International cover story is on Afghanistan..Cover photo by Adam Ferguson…My eyes were drawn to the headline that accompanies the image… “Why The US Will Never Save Afghanistan”…you compare that to the famous 2010 cover with Jodi Bieber’s Aisha portrait with the headline “What Happens if We Leave Afghanistan”,and I would argue there’s been a change in Afghanistan thinking at TIME’s editorial desk…see the covers side-by-side here.

Panos have a slideshow of Afghanistan images from the past ten years… Was looking at the below Martin Adler one from Kabul in 2002, and noticed the building looked familiar… realised it’s the same one as in a famous Simon Norfolk one from 2001… See the two side-by-side here

Photo: Martin Adler/Panos. Afghanistan. Kabul. 2002.

Panos Pictures (various photographers): 10 Years of War in Afghanistan (Panos)

Donovan Wylie: Capturing the Architecture of War Before It’s Gone (Lightbox)

Nice series on Lightbox by Gillian Laub from a Tel Aviv beach..Was surprised to see the credit didn’t mention Institute… Checked her website…Looks she’s no longer represented by them…

Gillian Laub: Tel Aviv Beach (TIME Lightbox)

Occupy Wall Street…

Nina Berman: Occupy Wall Street (NOOR)

Yunghi Kim: Faces of Occupy Wall Street (Photographer’s website)

Life.com: Occupy Wall Street (Life) Photos by various photographers

Larry Fink: Occupy Wall Street in 1967 (New Yorker)

From Newsweek…First Donald Weber’s photos from Japan… See later in this post for info on Weber’s grant writing workshop…

Donald Weber: Japan: Life After Zero Hour (Newsweek) Fukushima

Lynsey Addario: Famine in Africa’s Horn (Newsweek)

Rafal Milach: Life in Putin’s Russia (Newsweek)

More Russia… this by new VII member Davide Monteleone…

Davide Monteleone: Russian Soul (Phaidon)

Tomas Munita: Chilean Miners (NYT)

Stuart Freedman: Delhi’s Army of Homeless (Panos)

Lauren Greenfield: Child Beauty Queens (Institute)

Lauren Greenfield: Boom to Bust in Ireland (Institute)

Peter diCampo: Ivory Coast (VII Magazine)

Jonathan Saruk: Kabul Cinemas (MSNBC)

Richard Renaldi: Touching Strangers (TIME LightBox)

Lynsey Addario: Kenya (Starved for Attention)

Damir Sagolj: Hunger in North Korea (NYT Lens)

Peter Beste: Norwegian Black Metal (New Yorker)

Robin Hammond: Condemned (Panos)

Seamus Murphy: Libya (VII)

Tom Hyde: After The Fall (Statement Images)

Richard Nicholson: The Last Of London’s Darkrooms (NPR)

Giorgos Moutafis: The Arab Spring Project (Foto8) Moutafis’ website 

Xavier Comas: The House of the Raja (LightBox)

Elliott Erwitt: Sequentially, Yours (Magnum)

Matt Bowditch: Afghan Blueys (Lightbox)

Maciej Dakowicz: Cardiff Nights (M – Le Monde magazine)

Daniel Lilley: The Isle of Vindelis (Foto8)

Interviews and Talks

Don McCullin (CNN)

VII photographers Kashi, Pagetti, Bleasdale, Kratochvil interviewed (Canon Digital Learning Center)

Finbarr O’Reilly (Reuters Photo blog)

It appears Martin Parr has ditched the Nintendo.. Looks like he’s doing his thang with 5D kit and a Gary Fong diffuser in this video…

Martin Parr (YouTube) “Magnum photographer Martin Parr was asked by FotoFreo Festival Director Bob Hewitt to photograph three Western Australian port cities, Fremantle, Broome and Port Hedland.”

Paolo Woods (YouTube)

Davide Monteleone (BJP)

Free Sunday evening? Check this out…

Photo: John Moore/Getty Images

BagNewsSalon webinar discussing the visual framing of “The Great Recession” in the United States and Europe : Date: Sunday October 16th : Time: 10 am PST/1 pm EST/6pm GMT (running for 90 minutes) : Where:  Open-i platform, hosted by the London School of Communications, via live audio : Facebook RSVP here.

Mirjana Vrbaski (Conscientious)

Laura El-Tantawi (Emphas.is)

Jake Price (Verve)

Sergey Chilikov (BJP)

Articles 

Guardian’s monthly recommendations on exhibitions and books…

photo: Bruce Davidson  .. Was fiddling Davidson’s book last weekend…Stunning photos..

Guardian: The Month in Photography

More on the Davidson work…

Guardian: Bruce Davidson’s subway photography takes us to New York’s heart

New Yorker: New Photography at MOMA

BBC: Injured photographer Giles Duley wants Afghanistan return

Magnum Photos have some found Libyan Secret Service photos in their archive…David Campbell raised the issue should they be for sale like any other Magnum photo… Read the debate below…I saw some of the photos printed in the Guardian in July…Credited to Magnum Photos…pic of the spread here (had it on my iPhone)..I don’t know did Guardian have to pay Magnum for this set to be published…

David Campbell: The Libyan Secret Service photo archive – questions for Magnum Photos (DC Storify)

David Campbell: The problem with the dramatic staging of photojournalism: what is the real issue? (DC website)

Telegraph: Diane Arbus, in her own words (TelePhoto)

Telegraph: An Emergency in Slow Motion: The Inner Life of Diane Arbus by William Todd Schultz: review (Telegraph)

NYT Lens: Bringing Turkish Photography to the World Stage

PDN: Steve Jobs: Visionary, Inventor, and Very Challenging Photo Subject (PDN)

Reasons Why Professional Photographers Cannot Work for Free (Professional Photographers)

Nick Turpin: Distrify: A new model for distribution? (photographer’s blog)

Time: Joel Sternfeld: A Modern Master’s First Pictures (Time Lightbox)

Thames and Hudson: Magnum Contact Sheets – Production

Wayne Ford: We English: Simon Roberts extensive survey of the English at leisure (Wayne Ford Posterous)

BJP: Noor Images adds Andrea Bruce and Giancarlo Ceraudo as new members

No Caption Needed: Review of Errol Morris, Believing is Seeing (Observations on the Mysteries of Photography) (New York: Penguin, 2011) (No Caption Needed)

Joanna Hurley: Notes on the Artist Statement (Hurley Media)

A Photo Editor: Why Does Everyone Think They Need A Photo Book? (APE) Joerg Colberg’s thoughts on the matter

Granta: Remembering Tim Hetherington

PDN Photo of the Day: Marcus Bleasdale: Early Morning Prayers (PDN)

NYT Lens: Jack Delano’s American Sonata

Gizmodo: Photoshop Will End Blurry Pics Forever

Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Manu Brabo

Guardian: Featured photojournalist Ahmad Masood

The Independent: Out with the new: Turbine Hall’s latest work is tribute to old movies (Independent) | slide show (Guardian)  On a slightly different note, I was at Tate Modern over the weekend and saw their shop is selling Martin Parr Autoportrait ceramic plates for £65.. Fancy one? Take a look

Verve Photo: Diana Markosian (Verve)

Verve Photo: Katie Orlinsky (Verve)

Wired: Back to Basics: Analog Photography Project Aims to Slow Things Down

Adam Marelli: An in-depth look at Henri Cartier-Bresson’s composition style (adammarelliphoto.com)

Magnum Photos: Advice to young photographers (PDF)

Telegraph: National Gallery announces first major photography exhibition

PDN: Who Photographers Follow On Tumblr

Crowd funding

Condemned by Robin Hammond (Emphas.is)

Land of Hope and Dreams by Amnon Gutman (Kickstarter)

BTC oil pipeline by Amanda Rivkin (Empas.is)

Agencies and Collectives

Aletheia Newsletter

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

More awards for Yuri Kozyrev…

Yuri Kozyrev Wins 2 Prix Bayeux-Calvados Awards for Libya Coverage (PDN) Same news on BJP

Magenta Flash Forward 2012 Call for Submissions

Reminders…

Applications for the Tim Hetherington Grant are due 15 Oct. 

Time LightBox Next Generation Competition

NatGeo Photo Contest

IdeasTap Photographic Award: Finalists

Workshops

Grant Writing with Donald Weber : NYC Nov 17, 2011 : DC Nov 19, 2011

Duckrabbit three-day photo film workshops in London (30 Nov-2 Dec) and Birmingham (7-9 Dec)

Jobs

Brighton Photo Fringe is seeking a new Director

Events

BJP Vision 2011

multiMedia and Photo Communities

Foam Talent issue : Issuu

1000 Words : new issue

Contacts Editions

F8Magazine

52 by 52 : “A weekly photo challenge is set by fifty-two accomplished photographers throughout the course of a year”

Photographers

Reuters photographer, Finbarr O’Reilly, who shot the World Photo of the Year 2005,  has a website now…

Finbarr O’Reilly

Carlos Javier Ortiz

Paul Jeffrey

Sean Hawkey

To finish off… Seen it before, but was a giggle to bump into this again… The Life of Photographer

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